Share Facebook
Crohn's Disease Forum » Books, Multimedia, Research & News » Plantain and Broccoli May Inhibit Crohn's Relapse, Polysorbate 80 May Increase Risks


 
08-28-2011, 05:49 PM   #1
David
Co-Founder
 
David's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Naples, Florida
Plantain and Broccoli May Inhibit Crohn's Relapse, Polysorbate 80 May Increase Risks

Background Crohn's disease is common in developed nations where the typical diet is low in fibre and high in processed food. Primary lesions overlie Peyer's patches and colonic lymphoid follicles where bacterial invasion through M-cells occurs. We have assessed the effect of soluble non-starch polysaccharide (NSP) and food emulsifiers on translocation of Escherichia coli across M-cells.

Methods To assess effects of soluble plant fibres and food emulsifiers on translocation of mucosa-associated E coli isolates from Crohn's disease patients and from non-Crohn's controls, we used M-cell monolayers, generated by co-culture of Caco2-cl1 and Raji B cells, and human Peyer's patches mounted in Ussing chambers.

Results

E coli translocation increased across M-cells compared to parent Caco2-cl1 monocultures; 15.8-fold (IQR 6.2–32.0) for Crohn's disease E coli (N=8) and 6.7-fold (IQR 3.7–21.0) for control isolates (N=5). Electron microscopy confirmed E coli within M-cells. Plantain and broccoli NSP markedly reduced E coli translocation across M-cells at 5 mg/ml (range 45.3–82.6% inhibition, p<0.01); apple and leek NSP had no significant effect. Polysorbate-80, 0.01% vol/vol, increased E coli translocation through Caco2-cl1 monolayers 59-fold (p<0.05) and, at higher concentrations, increased translocation across M-cells. Similarly, E coli translocation across human Peyer's patches was reduced 45±7% by soluble plantain NSP (5 mg/ml) and increased 2-fold by polysorbate-80 (0.1% vol/vol).

Conclusions

Translocation of E coli across M-cells is reduced by soluble plant fibres, particularly plantain and broccoli, but increased by the emulsifier Polysorbate-80. These effects occur at relevant concentrations and may contribute to the impact of dietary factors on Crohn's disease pathogenesis.
Snipped from the "Discussion" area of the full article:

Soluble plant fibres, particularly those present in plantain and broccoli, are shown to inhibit translocation of Crohn's mucosa-associated E coli isolates across M-cells, at concentrations that should be readily achievable in vivo. This implies that dietary supplementation with such fibres might have a protective effect against Crohn's disease relapse by preventing bacterial invasion of the mucosa. NSP from plantain, as from other plant sources, might also have a conventional prebiotic effect via encouragement of probiotic bacteria that would not be relevant to the effects seen in these in vitro models. We feel that the ability of soluble plant fibres to block epithelial attachment and translocation by bacteria may be at least as important as any prebiotic effect, particularly in the small intestine. It also suggests that further investigation is warranted to assess whether soluble dietary fibre might have a more generalised beneficial effect on intestinal health, including bowel cancer and diarrhoeal disease, as a consequence of this ability to block interaction between intestinal bacteria and the epithelium.
The full article

Polysorbate-80 is a COMMON ingredient in processed foods, it is an emulsifier.

Fun fact: one of the inactive ingredients of Remicade is Polysorbate-80

It's interesting that one of the foods so many here turn to in a bad flare is bananas. However, you MAY want to try plantains instead (I realize that's not exactly what this article is saying) just as an experiment as there IS a difference. Or eat them when you're doing well to help you stay well.

What is a Plantain?

Plantains are a member of the banana family. They are a starchy, low in sugar variety that is cooked before serving as it is unsuitable raw. It is used in many savory dishes somewhat like a potato would be used and is very popular in Western Africa and the Caribbean countries. It is usually fried or baked.

Plantains are native to India and are grown most widely in tropical climates. Plantains are sometimes referred to as the pasta and potatoes of the Caribbean. Sold in the fresh produce section of the supermarket, they usually resemble green bananas but ripe plantains may be black in color. This vegetable-banana can be eaten and tastes different at every stage of development. The interior color of the fruit will remain creamy, yellowish or lightly pink. When the peel is green to yellow, the flavor of the flesh is bland and its texture is starchy. As the peel changes to brown or black, it has a sweeter flavor and more of a banana aroma, but still keeps a firm shape when cooked.

The plantain averages about 65% moisture content and the banana averages about 83% moisture content. Since hydrolysis, the process by which starches are converted to sugars, acts fastest in fruit of higher moisture content it converts starches to sugars faster in bananas than it does in plantains. A banana is ready to eat when the skin is yellow whereas a plantain is not ready to eat "out of hand" until hydrolysis has progressed to the point where the skin is almost black.

Plantains grow best in areas with constant warm temperatures and protection from strong winds. They have been grown in scattered locations throughout Florida since the 16th century. Because of the occasional freezes, Florida is considered a marginal area for plantain production. They are available year round in the supermarket.
Source
__________________
It's good to be back
08-29-2011, 02:10 AM   #2
DustyKat
Super Moderator
 
DustyKat's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: New South Wales, Australia
Thanks for posting David!

Dusty.
__________________
Mum of 2 kids with Crohn's.
08-29-2011, 12:29 PM   #3
Crohns08
Senior Member
 
Crohns08's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Florida
I'm definitely going to have to give plantains a try! Especially since they're easily accessible in Florida Thanks for posting!
__________________
Toni, Diagnosed in September '08
Specific Carbohydrate diet
Currently on:
Yoga
Vitamin D
Gabapentin
SCD Multivitamin
Tums
Percocet
60 mg pred tapering weekly
Protonix
Levofloxin
Surgeries:
09/2011 - Draining an Abcess the size of a lemon!
10/2011 - Same abcess, different approach this time, open incision!


Add Me on Facebook!
08-29-2011, 12:49 PM   #4
CrohnsGuy
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Cambridge, Massachusetts
Either when they're green or yellow, plantains are delicious fried in some coconut oil with a little cinnamon.
08-29-2011, 12:52 PM   #5
David
Co-Founder
 
David's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Naples, Florida
The biggest message I personally get from all of this is to avoid processed foods and additives such as polysorbate-80. My guess is that, over time, we'll find these additives, preservatives, and god know what else they're feeding us are leading to all sort of health problems.
08-29-2011, 12:55 PM   #6
CrohnsGuy
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Cambridge, Massachusetts
As I've said before, JERF (just eat real food) and opt out of this health/science experiment.
08-29-2011, 12:57 PM   #7
David
Co-Founder
 
David's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Naples, Florida
I hear that!

To add an additional layer to that, I don't eat anything that isn't organic.
08-31-2011, 11:37 AM   #8
xJillx
Your Story Forum Monitor
 
xJillx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Pennsylvania

My Support Groups:
My mother was just telling me about eating plantains after picking up a book about diet options for different illness. Plantains were listed as being very beneficial for those with Crohn's.

Thanks for sharing, David!
__________________
Jill

Diagnosed with Crohn's Disease - July 2010
Diagnosis of Crohn's Disease Retracted - October 2011

I am still sick and so confused...
08-31-2011, 12:53 PM   #9
hopeful
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010

My Support Groups:
· Stoma
Thanks David. For Europeans - the food additive code is E433. Wikipedia says people in Europe and USA consume about 100mg per day.
09-01-2011, 03:09 PM   #10
CrohnsGuy
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Cambridge, Massachusetts
Great read that I will post in the "Books" section as well:

http://www.amazon.com/Deep-Nutrition...4906761&sr=1-1
09-09-2011, 07:47 AM   #11
sunflower
Senior Member
 
sunflower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Kansas

My Support Groups:
I am glad you clarified about the plantain. My first thought, I guess because it was paired with broccoli, was of the plantain green leafy plant. Here is a link to Wikpedia, and I guess it is also called plantago. I had recently been reading about how good they are for you!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plantago

I wonder if we like processed food because we crave the poisons in them? Sometimes we desire what is bad for our bodies. I am doing better with my diet, but still haven't completely converted.
__________________
Diagnosed: 1992 with Crohn's
Current meds: Asacol HD, Humira plus many more!
Also have hypothyroid, diabetes type II, Fibromyalgia, Insomnia, AS diagnosed 12/11 (on my birthday).
09-09-2011, 12:13 PM   #12
CrohnsGuy
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Cambridge, Massachusetts
In general, processed foods are "designed" to appeal to our taste buds (sweet, salty, etc.). The food companies do this so they're able to sell more junk.
09-14-2011, 05:52 AM   #13
jenjen
New Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: California
This is a great article.
I was in Ghana, West Africa for 3 months earlier this year where plantains are a diet staple. Before going I was a little nervous about how my Crohn's would do with the change in food. For the entire time I was there I had not one single Crohn's symptom. Now I realize it's probably because I was eating plantains for breakfast, lunch, and dinner!!
09-14-2011, 10:31 AM   #14
David
Co-Founder
 
David's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Naples, Florida
Wow jenjen! Once you left Ghana, did your lack of symptoms persist or did they come back? If they did come back, after how long?
09-14-2011, 10:33 AM   #15
CrohnsGuy
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Cambridge, Massachusetts
Cheers to eating traditional foods!
09-14-2011, 10:40 AM   #16
Carrie630
The Prettiest Princess
 
Carrie630's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Ohio

My Support Groups:
fried/grilled plantains are really good with fresh salsa. You can also slice them up thinner and bake them to make chips. They don't have quite as much flavor as banana, but it's a similar taste.
09-14-2011, 01:59 PM   #17
jenjen
New Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: California
Wow jenjen! Once you left Ghana, did your lack of symptoms persist or did they come back? If they did come back, after how long?
My sx started back up about a month after I got back and have been ramping up to the flare I'm currently in right now. I think I'll go buy some plantains today.
10-08-2011, 03:48 AM   #18
EmAitch88
Senior Member
 
EmAitch88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Washington
this is incredibly interesting to me!! thanks for posting, David! you've always got great info.

i LOVE steamed broccoli. never tried plantains. i am definitely going to look for them....but they might be pretty pricey here in Washington state. i dunno.
__________________
ladies don't start fights, but they finish them.

Asacol hd dr 800mg
Azathioprine 50mg
10-08-2011, 07:24 PM   #19
flowergirl
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: florida
interesting. bananas don't seem to do well for me.
11-03-2011, 09:35 PM   #20
stupidbody!
 
stupidbody!'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Billings, Montana
Interesting about the plantains! Can't say I eat much processed food as I seem to be sensitive to almost everything! I'm looking forward to trying plantains! Hopefully I do ok with them though cause bananas give me headaches. We really like broccoli.
__________________
Finally diagnosed with Crohn's Feb. 2011

Married to an amazing man and have 2 daughters (one before and one after Crohn's diagnosis).
11-03-2011, 09:46 PM   #21
kiny
Senior Member
 
kiny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Trying to find these things in Belgium but haven't had any luck, I asked someone to keep an eye out if he sees them. Otherwise I might just ask them to order them for me. Normal grocery stores do not have these at all.

The brocoli dose they used in mice was really high though, unless you decide to eat a few tons of brocoli a day it doesn't help. There was a company who was going to make a concentrate though.

Plantain does help by just eating it.

edit: "could help"
11-04-2011, 09:14 PM   #22
David
Co-Founder
 
David's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Naples, Florida
The brocoli dose they used in mice was really high though, unless you decide to eat a few tons of brocoli a day it doesn't help. There was a company who was going to make a concentrate though.
Try to find organic broccoli sprouts. Most of the goodness in highly concentrated form without all the tough fiber. I put them on sandwiches and they're wonderful!
11-04-2011, 10:39 PM   #23
kiny
Senior Member
 
kiny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Thank you, I'll do my best to get some asap.
11-04-2011, 10:40 PM   #24
kiny
Senior Member
 
kiny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
This paper was so long so I started to write my summary, gonna just copy paste it if anyone doesn't feel like reading it.

Target:

*E Coli overabundance, specifically invasive E coli (AIEC)

Supplies:

*E Coli strains isolated from 6 CD patients (cultured overnight), E coli HM615 was selected
*Control: 5 patients without CD

*Plantain NSP preparations from plant based soluable fibre (from Provexis PLC, UK) in concentrations within the limit achievable by dietary supplementation

*Broccoli

*Food emulsifiers used in the food industry, polysorbate 60, polysorbate 80

Test:

*Observation of E Coli 605 translocation across M cells without supplements
*Observation of inhibition of invasion and adhesion of E Coli across M cells after 50 mg/ml of Plantain NSP
*Similar inhibition of invasion and adhesion after broccoli at greater or equal of 0.5 mg/ml

*E coli translocation increased with polysorbate 80






About that recent article that said vaccinations might have triggered the onset of crohn's, I don't remember where I saw it, polysorbate 80 is found in vaccinations, was that the reason? Would be pretty ridiculous if the reason that people in Africa don't have crohn's is because they don't get vaccinated as much.

Also, we should make a list of foods that are filled with polysorbate 80.
11-04-2011, 11:56 PM   #25
kiny
Senior Member
 
kiny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Ok, the reason for the broccoli effect is the Sulforaphane concentration in it I think, I don't know why that article doesn't mention that. Sulforaphane concentrate is available as a supplement and quite harmless afaik. I asked someone for some more info.

Last edited by kiny; 03-22-2014 at 03:34 PM.
11-06-2011, 01:01 AM   #26
stupidbody!
 
stupidbody!'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Billings, Montana
Kiny - good ideas about a list of foods with polysorbate. I couldn't find one quickly but it looks like it's in A LOT of things! Label reading. I haven't had a vaccine since I was 5 so I don't think that's too big of a factor.

My husband's been making me yummy plantain dishes the last couple days. So far no headaches from it (banana allergy). My daughter loves it too - my little fruit monster.
12-20-2011, 11:31 PM   #27
mnsun
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
I like cutting plantains in 1/2 inch rounds, dusting in equal parts cloves and cinnamon, and adding sprinkles of turbinado sugar. Then fry in coconut oil on medium heat for 8-10 min, flipping once. After that, I added the plantains to a can of (BPA-free, at least--but who knows the substitute) Eden Foods Curried Rice and Lentils. I assure, this is very tasty!

On the broccoli front, most supplements are expensive. I occasionally take Broccomax.
12-21-2011, 12:58 PM   #28
cheeky
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
nice! my background is jamaican, and i'm a big fan of plantain - it's a typical side dish in my culture... also, anytime i have veggies, my favourite is broccoli and red pepper... maybe the peppers aren't good? but i love red pepper lol
12-22-2011, 06:12 AM   #29
Igor_Passau
Forum Monitor
 
Igor_Passau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Kyiv, Ukraine
Does not help!During 2 years’ experience….
10-10-2013, 11:30 AM   #30
Kbug6205
 
Kbug6205's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Kleefeld, Manitoba
Do you need to wait until the plantains are ripe before cooking them, as I understand they are sweeter when ripe. I don't have a clue how to prepare them.
Reply

Crohn's Disease Forum » Books, Multimedia, Research & News » Plantain and Broccoli May Inhibit Crohn's Relapse, Polysorbate 80 May Increase Risks
Thread Tools


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:39 PM.
Copyright 2006-2017 Crohnsforum.com