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Crohn's Disease Forum » General IBD Discussion » Traveling with Crohn's


 
03-27-2012, 02:30 PM   #31
natatak227
 
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This might sound strange, but I would wear one of those underwear type Depends, if you are really worried or in a flare and must travel. They aren't terribly uncomfortable and do give some piece of mind. I've used them when I'm in a flare and have to do long CT tests, just in case.

The last flight I was on, the plane got stuck on the runway for over an hour and no one was able to get up to use the restroom. And I mean NO ONE! I asked and plead with the attendents to let me use the restroom, which didn't work one bit. I even showed them my, "I CAN'T WAIT" card from the CCFA, still a no go.
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Crohn's like symptoms since 2007; Diagnosed with Crohn's February 2012

Current Meds:
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Imuran 150mg/day
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03-27-2012, 08:17 PM   #32
Emily
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Hey guys, problem here. Me and my sis are spending a month in Italy at the end of May and I don't know what to do about my Humira!! Theres no way I can keep it cold for the whole flight and everything, and then find a fridge at every hostel we stay at! Plus, I'll probably need a 2 month supply. Is it possible to obtain it in Italy rather than get it here and bring it all over the place ? Anyone have any experience with going overseas on a biologic?
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Age 24
  • Diagnosed with Crohn's at age 7
  • Partial colectomy at age 18
  • Total colectomy with ileostomy at age 23
infliximab & azathioprine
03-28-2012, 05:10 AM   #33
Kelsey
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I recently returned from a trip to Thailand and I was very nervous travelling on my own with crohns but surprisingly I had no major crohns symptoms until I literally landed back home, which makes me kinda think about what was so different over there?
I had no issue with getting all my medications on the plane with me I just made sure I had a letter from my specialist on me and a couple spare in my suitcase just incase.
I also requested a seat on the aisle just incase I had to do a quick dash to the loo and I also made sure I was up and moving about a lot .

Have a good trip and safe travels
04-01-2012, 03:59 PM   #34
notfullyfathomed
 
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Hey Emily! I was curious about this so I did a quick search from "traveling with humira" and what do you know...lots of other people have this question too. Here's a pretty detailed blog post:
http://travelingwithumira.blogspot.com/

Another thought might be having someone FedEx it to you overnight with dry ice. I know that you can do this domestically, but I'm not sure about international. It sounds like the makers of Humira have some good suggestions, though. Good luck and buon viaggio!
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Anna
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Resection in 2003 due to a pill cam gone wrong!
6-mp for 13 years, now on Imuran 125 mg, Pred, and Remicade...counting down to just Remi and no more pills!!
04-01-2012, 09:04 PM   #35
Emily
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Thank you Anna!! That's really helpful. I'm seeing my GI in a few weeks and I'm going to ask if theres any other options. If not, this is what I'll do. Thanks again!
04-16-2012, 01:45 PM   #36
sarabrooks
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The best thing I ever did for myself on a plane flight was giving one of the flight attendants a heads up! she was so helpful the entire time! try it out some time.
04-18-2012, 02:09 AM   #37
Gra
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Aisle seat near toilets.

Tell the cabin staff about your "needs".

In your carry on bag (or pocket) - Immodium and laxatives are top priority - you never know when....

I always travel with my own (half size) toilet roll in case, and a spare clean pair of undies. Also a pack of quality "wet wipes".

Pref. take some food you can tolerate with you in case food on board is unsuitable.

Gra.
04-19-2012, 01:59 AM   #38
blgdave
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I travel about a fair old bit and have done the Uk to NZ and Aussie a few times over the last few years. That was one of my main worries at the time as I was in a bad flare up and had to fly for 26 hours. I just loaded up with Immodium and made sure my seat was "easy access".

What I always try to do, is really not think about it. Sounds weird, but stressing out seems to kick me off more?

Also a top tip, when ever you get up. Just go to the toilet and have a good old release. Also every toilet you pass in transfers, just have a go. I take full advantage of when ever I see a sign.

By the way, I taught the poor Indian fella in Dubai transfer terminal toilets a lesson he wont forget!!

Also anyone ever travelling through Sydney, make sure you have a toilet vist before going to the transfer gate. They seem to take for ever to get people through there!

Cheers
Dave...
05-10-2012, 11:48 AM   #39
jencav
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Can anyone help please?
I live in the Uk and im due to go to Kenya 2nd July. Ive had chron's for just over 2 years and i take azathioprine 125mg. Ive been to the doctors to discuss what vaccinations i need and because my medication is an immunosuppresant i cant have the yellow fever vaccination as its a live injection. I can have other vaccinations to protect me just not this. Now as far as i know they dont check what you have and havent had when getting into kenya but has anyone been? Can anyone give me any advice? am i more at risk of getting it? im so confused.
05-26-2012, 04:09 AM   #40
xX_LittleMissValentine_Xx
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I've booked my holiday with my friends to Rhodes next month. I'm really excited but a little bit worried. The flight is 3 1/2 hours which isn't too bad but I have only ever been on two planes before! I'm going to take all of your advice!

But I've been thinking things like, what if I go on the beach and get sand in my fistula's. I really don't want to feel them building up like an abscess again while I'm on holiday. Maybe I'm just worrying over little things! I went to the beach with them last year, I just didn't realise what they were then and hadn't been hospitalised for them!
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Past:
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05-27-2012, 05:29 PM   #41
Judith
 
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Can anyone help please?
I live in the Uk and im due to go to Kenya 2nd July. Ive had chron's for just over 2 years and i take azathioprine 125mg. Ive been to the doctors to discuss what vaccinations i need and because my medication is an immunosuppresant i cant have the yellow fever vaccination as its a live injection. I can have other vaccinations to protect me just not this. Now as far as i know they dont check what you have and havent had when getting into kenya but has anyone been? Can anyone give me any advice? am i more at risk of getting it? im so confused.
Hi Jencav,

Kenya sounds beautiful. I have never been but the safest thing to do would be to not risk it. That being said, here is some information that can hopefully help you make your decision. It is from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), in the US, regarding Yellow Fever Risk in Africa and South America. It appears Kenya has certain high risk and lower risk areas. It also depends on the month you will be there (rainy season or not):
http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbo...llow-fever.htm

and recommendations for Immunocompromised Travelers:
http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbo...-travelers.htm

More info about Kenya and vaccinations: http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/destinations/kenya.htm

Map: http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbo...fever.htm#2853

Hope it helps,
J
05-27-2012, 08:11 PM   #42
Susan2
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I have been to Kenya and was able to have the Yellow Fever vaccination, but, as Judith said, was advised that the risk varied on where and when you were travelling.

My certificate was not checked in Kenya, but the Australian authorities can be quite strict about travellers returning from Yellow Fever declared countries and my certificate was certainly checked on my return home. I don't know how the USA stands on this; it would be worth checking.

Having said that, my safari experience in Kenta and Tanzania was absolutely amazing.

I had one bad spell of vomitting and diarrhea and, as I have an ileostomy, that was a bit of a problem but I took a couple of days out, then caught up with the group.
06-19-2012, 02:39 PM   #43
Tummyache
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
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Anyone considering a visit to Panama? We are retired and live in Panama most of the year, traveling back and forth to the USA 3-4 times a year. Here in Panama there is a new benefit for visitors - health insurance comes FREE with your stamped passport for 30 days. Nice to know! [Inquire at the information desk at the airport upon landing for a medical contact phone number in case of a medical emergency]. It is one of the countries known for 'medical tourism' since medical care is top-notch and much less expensive than in the USA. Aside from that, most medications, except controlled meds, can be bought directly from a pharmacy without a prescription from a Panamanian doctor - never tried using a USA prescription, so don't know about that. But, so far we have found out-of-pocket most of our meds cost what the copay is for Medicare or less. We have many fine hospitals and clinics throughout the country. As an example: Hospital y Clinica Punta Pacifica, which is affiliated with John Hopkins International and is located in Panama City [near the Canal], where you will most likely be landing at Tocuman International Airport. [I believe John Hopkins is considered to be one of the top medical groups in the USA, and this Panamanian hospital/clinic extension definitely reflects that reputation and standard.] You will find most college educated people speak some English and many doctors are very proficient. Also, USA money and Panamanian dollars + coins are interchangeable, so there is no "exchange rate" to worry about when purchases are made.
06-25-2012, 10:51 AM   #44
ZM1019
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Travel for me has become nothing but a nightmare (since before the CD diagnose). I can't have any form of starch at all, not even trace elements so I basically can't eat which sets off low blood sugar and a pounding headache. It took me awhile after the low blood sugar to figure out to just order milk (real milk because I can't have powdered anything since they use starch as a filler in powdered things). Milk doesn't bother me at all so now I stick to that on the plane. I've had to do a couple of trips where it took over 20 hours and I was no where long enough to get a meal I could actually eat so knowing this became crucial.

Eating in country? Argh. I think it sounds easier for you all (and that's not saying you have it easy at all). For me it's the problem of most countries don't think in terms of all the different forms of starch or believe it's gluten no matter what you say. Also, many countries don't use the word starch like we do in English so you have to know every food and ingredient that has to be avoided and trust that they won't throw spices or powdered consomme in the food. Typically I won't touch anything in a restaurant or a house. I just absolutely refuse. I go to the store and buy fruit, veggies and meat I recognize and make it myself (which requires that I stay somewhere that I can do that). Thankfully fruit and veggies that don't have starch are okay for me but you can imagine how hard it is when things are unfamiliar and you have no idea what you're really getting.

The other thing I learned the hard way is that other countries have limited medication selection and a lot don't have compounding pharmacies so if I get hurt or sick, I'm pretty much done because they can't give me anything. I found that out when I was living in Costa Rica for work and I had to get transferred back.

This has really been terrible for me because I love to travel and I feel like this problem has absolutely ruined it. Instead of enjoying a country and experiencing it, I spend all of my time worrying about what and where I can eat and scheduling around that. I used to have many people I would travel with and now I have no one because none of them want to deal with these kinds of limitations and it takes all of the fun out of the trip for them as well. It's become one of the hardest things with which I've had to deal.
06-25-2012, 02:17 PM   #45
nitty
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One thing that's useful to take, especially in countries with basic health facilities, is a sterile pack. This contains sterile needles and IV cannulas amongst other things. I'm in the UK and I was able to buy one through my family doctors surgery. Obviously it has to go in luggage in the hold.

My husband and I took them when we went to Kenya on our honeymoon (13 years ago), and that was when we were two healthy people with no medical problems, but wanted safe sharps in a country with basic healthcare and a high HIV rate.

I ended up with rotten D, simply because I wasn't used to eating so much fruit (!!), so if I'd had the gut I've got now I could have ended up really seriously dehydrated and possibly needing IV fluids.

On the subject of Kenya, we did have Yellow Fever vaccinations (though of course we had no health reasons not to), and if I remember correctly, we were told that we didn't need the vaccination certificate to get to Kenya, but that we did need it to be allowed back into the UK. I'm afraid I can't remember if it was actually checked at border control or not.

I'm not sure what the situation is with anti-malarials and Crohn's meds. I remember that different areas of Kenya have different risk levels. You have to make sure you take the anti-malarials for the specified time even after returning, otherwise you're not covered (I think that's why Cheryl Cole got sick recently).

Sorry if I've repeated anything, I didn't get to read the whole thread.
06-27-2012, 10:27 AM   #46
Mia E
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hi all!

this sticky is great! thanks for all the advice! i've got my notepad out recording it all!!

I'm interested in anyone's experience of travelling long haul with sri lankan airlines with crohns? I'm going on my honeymoon in august (i can NOT wait! so excited ) and I wonder how accomodating they are? would love to chat to someone who works for them in heathrow, this forum is amazing i would not be surprised to find someone!lol

I also read something about dvt being high risk. is this something i should worry about? i had surgery 2 months ago. could this help me get extra leg room (ie which means i can run out to the bathroom when needed!).

Im also so worried about the lines that form for the loo! First- the wait when u feel like u are going to poo your pants, and second- the embarrassing smell that may be left and someone has to walk in to/ floats down the plane
sorry for being graphic but we all know what its like!

thanks!x
__________________
-april 2012-diagnosed crohns- only after surgery (resection terminal ileum,ileocecal valve,appendix & cecum)

for me crohns is not cool
06-27-2012, 01:00 PM   #47
Tesscorm
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FWIW, just some general travel info for Canadians...


You may find some useful information regarding steps to take while travelling with a prescription medication at the following links:
http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/tmp-pmv/p...ur_way-eng.pdf
http://www.voyage.gc.ca/faq/medical-eng.asp#5

Should you require further information, we would recommend that you contact the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), since it manages Canada's borders by administering and enforcing domestic laws that govern trade and travel, as well as international agreements and conventions. Please contact the Border Information Service at 1-800-461-9999. For calls outside of Canada (long distance charges apply), please call 1-204-983-3500, 1-506-636-5064, or e-mail at [email protected].
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Treatment:
May-July 2011 - 6 wks Exclusive EN via NG tube - 2000 ml/night, 1 wk IV Flagyl
July 2011-July 2013 - Supplemental EN via NG, 1000 ml/night, 5 nites/wk, Nexium, 40 mg
Feb. 2013-present - Remicade, 5 mg/kg every 6 wks
Supplements: 1-2 Boost shakes, D3 - 2000 IUs, Krill Oil
07-07-2012, 04:50 AM   #48
healthynow
 
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hi Ekuskrash, I have travelled heaps with crohns, India (northern) hong kong, Taiwan, Japan heaps in asia, the only advice i can give is make sure u get a letter from your DR listing your meds, take some with you on the plane the last thing u want is lost baggage with your meds in there and travel insurance declare your crohns, it may cost more but if u need it it will be worth it. I always tried to use the loo before iwent anywhere for a long period of time and just didn't eat a terrible lot when i was going to be away from a toilet for a long period of time and if i was out and about i would find a hotel and in the eating area was usually a loo nearby. Enjoy your travel dont let crohns rule your life
Cheers
healthy
07-07-2012, 04:58 AM   #49
healthynow
 
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Location: New South Wales, Australia
Hi Mia E, this is going to sound weird but, the trick of pooing in public is flush as soon as it goes in even if u flush a few times who cares, and my poor daughter when she was little and i couldn't leave her outside while i went to the loo and i was travelling with her airports ect she had to come in with me so i got her to 1 look the ohter way and tell her sing me a lovely little song really loud so no one would hear the explosion going on (bless her little cotton socks) it was hilarious she would be disgusted if she remembered that now (she is 15 now) when u r on holidays and walking around seeing the sights need to go find a hotel where the eating area is is usually a loo nearby
Cheers have a good trip away
07-11-2012, 03:57 PM   #50
Snoflayk505
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Diet and stress are HUGE factors. Im pretty sure Ive tried every Crohn's medication out there. Some work for a while, some don't. EVERYONE is different. Many people, like me, have obtained a symptom free life medication free simply by changing their diets. Works for some, others it doesn't. Always worth a try though, right!? I follow the "specific carbohydrate diet".

As for traveling, always know where the restroom is Best advice from one Crohnie to another lol. Good luck to you.
__________________
Diagnosed Crohn's/Colitis/RA/Hypothyroid in 2000
Endometriosis 05
Resection after resection, drug after drug
Ostomy placed, Rectum removed 2010 etc etc etc..

MED FREE! Working with GI on the SCD Diet to manage my Crohn's =D
I'm VERY new to the diet. Seems certain foods cause my symptoms. Testing that theory!

My recipe blog
www.foreverscd.blogspot.com

SCD site (food list, beginners guide)
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08-19-2012, 12:40 AM   #51
prplkow
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Hi all, I am still a newbie to this site, but I thought I would share my traveling experience. First I would like to thank everyone in this thread for their comments and suggestions because it really helped me.

I went on a three week vacation to Europe - Germany, Netherlands and Austria. Since I was newly diagnosed, I took my colonoscopy/upper endoscopy report with me as my medical info (which is all I have and my doctor suggested it as well). I also had to get a "vacation advance" on my meds, so I definitely had enough. I packed some in my purse and some in my luggage. I followed the advice of packing extra underwear and pants, toilet paper, wipes, diaper/pads, etc. in my backpack I took everywhere with me. I never ended up using them, but the comfort of knowing that I had them "just in case" was a good feeling. I used the toilet every chance I had. Sometimes even if I didn't even think I had to go, I would make the stop anyway. I always scoped out where the restrooms were. I also carried a small perfume in my purse to help with any odor (and a larger perfume/deodorizer for the hotel bathroom).

I packed some food that I knew I could eat so I would always have something safe (peanut butter, manuka honey and some gluten free crackers). Servers in restaurants were always good about letting me know what was in the dishes (my husband is fluent in German, so that also helped). Sometimes there was not a lot I could pick from, but there was always at least something. There were some times I strayed off and ate something that I knew would cause problems, but I would only eat a little and the side effects were not that bad. I did have a glass of beer, that was not a nice experience later. I don't do anything with bubbles because it just hurts too much. That was also a learning experience...a lot of places only served or carried bubbled water. I learned to always have "still water" in my purse (and stock up on it when we found it).

All in all the experience was good. Being prepared for anything really helped and also set my mind at ease. Thanks again everyone for all your input and suggestions. =)
08-29-2012, 07:39 PM   #52
Rachel
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HI everyone, I recently went on my honeymoon to Mexico in June. Everything went pretty smoothly with my Crohn's. No major flares. I took all my meds in my carry on in their original containers.

One thing that did go wrong though was my husband had the tip of his finger cut off on our second day. He was climbing up the ladder of a boat in the ocean and his finger got caught in the hinge of the ladder and it cut the tip off. We ended up staying 2 days in a mexican hospital where no one spoke english. They never asked for what drugs he was allergic to, nor did I fill out any medical paperwork for him.

Although this happened to him and not me, I did learn something about traveling and having Crohn's.

Always carry a list of your current medications in you and a list of what drugs NOT to give you if you are hospitalized.

Communicate with the people you are traveling with that you have an autoimmune disease and what they need to do if you are taken to the hospital

Fight to get a translator if you are in a nonenglish speaking country

Fight to have open communication between you and the doctor/nurses

Do your research before you travel about the surrounding hospitals etc

Always be prepared! You never know what can happen!
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Rachel

Diagnosed September 2011
Current drugs:
Prednisone, Cimzia,Pentasa, Entocort, Prednisone, Xanax, CitraNatal DHA, Loestrin 1/20, PHillips Colon Health Probiotic
When needed:
Immodium, Donnatal Elixir, Bentyl


www.crohnsnewlywed.blogspot.com
09-16-2012, 05:48 AM   #53
lara5559
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: yorks, United Kingdom
Well I have just booked a holiday to Los Angeles next march. Thats a 11 hour flight. Just hope im not flaring at the time. Because I do get stressed when flying and 11 hours is a long time. Still not being diagnosed with anything definate, just told it was distal proctitis 15 months ago after sigmoidoscopy and again im just settling from my 2nd flare after 4 weeks of bledding etc after suffering from some bug.

Im on mesalazine and have taken the predfoam again which works. Im just wondering if I have to get any insurance cover for Proctitis? My consultant said dont go labelling yourself a colitis sufferer on policies etc as it may burn out and was caused most prob by the virus I had. But now had another flare i think Im going have this for life.

Any info would be great?

Lara
10-06-2012, 07:24 PM   #54
Graze
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
O how exciting I lived in Colombia for a few months and it was such a good experience. The food was amazing and I wasn't strong willed enough to say no to trying all the new food so just lived with the consequences... It was worth it. I don't know if it is the same in Chilie but in Colombia you are not meant to flush toilet paper down the loo. I did not find this out until after a few days of being there...also may be helpful to carry some toilet paper/tissues with you wherever you go as a lot of the toilets didn't have any or you had to pay. O and likewise for soap, do may pay to carry hand sanitizer with you.

I hope the Crohns stays under control and I'm sure you'll have an amazing time.
10-18-2012, 09:07 AM   #55
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I would strongly suggest taking Activated Charcoal tablets with food as it helps to eliminate any bad toxins or bactirea that you may have ate (consult your doctor first)
11-06-2012, 12:15 AM   #56
glory_h
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Aside from that, most medications, except controlled meds, can be bought directly from a pharmacy without a prescription from a Panamanian doctor - never tried using a USA prescription, so don't know about that. But, so far we have found out-of-pocket most of our meds cost what the copay is for Medicare or less.
Hi Tummyache!

So glad to see your post. My husband and I are hoping to move abroad at some point hopefully in a year or so. I am taking Pentasa which is keeping my Crohn's in check. My quality of life is great, but we are concerned about moving abroad and being able to continue to get Pentasa.

I was wondering - what medications have you gotten in Panama? If you have gotten Pentasa, how much was the Rx? Have you seen doctors there or had any procedures like colonoscopy, etc?

Thanks for any and all info! We were looking into Costa Rica because it has a good reputation for healthcare but Panama is also a top option for us.

Thanks!
11-06-2012, 08:14 AM   #57
Tummyache
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Austin, Texas
Actually, I am one of those very lucky folks who evidently has very mild IBD which is controlled with a restricted diet [no dairy, no gluten, very low sugar], vitamins + minerals, and probiotics. I never cheat. I have been given a med to control intestinal inflammation only a few times in my life.

However, I can tell you that we live in Panama City, Panama [in a neighborhood called San Francisco], only about a mile from Punta Pacifica Hospital and Clinic [a John Hopkins International Hospital] which is excellent. We travel back and forth to TX 2 times a year where we use our medicare for those things that are less expensive there - currently medicare cannot be used in Panama. Those few meds we buy in the US through insurance are sent to us via a forwarding mail service in Miami, FL, or we get them while in TX - we do the 3 month mail order meds. This has worked out quite well! Generally in Panama, all medical care we have had costs us 1/2 to 1/3 TX medicare copay cost, plus most meds are at medicare co-pay cost or lower. For example, the most dramatic difference in cost is my thyroid med which is $8 for 50 pills in Panama. Meanwhile, our insurance in TX charges us $30 for 30 pills [all from the same original pharma company].

We thought originally we would retire to Costa Rica - but after doing our homework, we decided that Panama had a lot more to offer retirees. Panama gives us 25% off all airline fares that originate here, for example. After visiting both countries, we found Panama to be a better fit for us. Before deciding, we recommend you visit on your own in both countries and talk to as many other retirees as possible, rather than taking one of those commercial retiree trips that are pushing their agenda and keep you in a controlled environment. International living can be wonderful if you are willing to adjust to a non-USA culture and willing to try to learn Spanish, but it is not for everyone. We have known folks who couldn't adjust and soon returned to the USA. However, the rest of us are REALLY enjoying the adventure! We wish you lots of luck and fun as you explore the options!
11-13-2012, 07:35 PM   #58
Jasoncode3
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Santa Rosa, California

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Anyone considering a visit to Panama? We are retired and live in Panama most of the year, traveling back and forth to the USA 3-4 times a year. Here in Panama there is a new benefit for visitors - health insurance comes FREE with your stamped passport for 30 days. Nice to know! [Inquire at the information desk at the airport upon landing for a medical contact phone number in case of a medical emergency]. It is one of the countries known for 'medical tourism' since medical care is top-notch and much less expensive than in the USA. Aside from that, most medications, except controlled meds, can be bought directly from a pharmacy without a prescription from a Panamanian doctor - never tried using a USA prescription, so don't know about that. But, so far we have found out-of-pocket most of our meds cost what the copay is for Medicare or less. We have many fine hospitals and clinics throughout the country. As an example: Hospital y Clinica Punta Pacifica, which is affiliated with John Hopkins International and is located in Panama City [near the Canal], where you will most likely be landing at Tocuman International Airport. [I believe John Hopkins is considered to be one of the top medical groups in the USA, and this Panamanian hospital/clinic extension definitely reflects that reputation and standard.] You will find most college educated people speak some English and many doctors are very proficient. Also, USA money and Panamanian dollars + coins are interchangeable, so there is no "exchange rate" to worry about when purchases are made.
Just wondering if you receive remicade, and if so what is the cost in Panama?
11-14-2012, 07:00 AM   #59
Tummyache
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Austin, Texas
I am taking no meds - am strict with diet [gluten free + dairy free + low sugar] and suppliments [vitamins + minerals + fish oil + probiotics]. My scopes + biopsies were clear and normal last month -so doctor said to keep doing what I am doing, for me it is working. But, some years ago they said it's likely mild Crohns. Now I am wondering if that was not miss diagnosed at the time.
11-19-2012, 09:24 AM   #60
Danico85
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Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Glasgow
I travelled from Glasgow to Australia via Dubai and back on holiday last year. I was pretty worried before hand. The flight itself was horrific but my bowels didnt move, infact they dried up a little, so make sure you drink plenty of water. Although, the que to the toilet was always massive which was a bit of a worry! Thankfully i never needed.
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Crohn's Disease Forum » General IBD Discussion » Traveling with Crohn's
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