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07-13-2012, 06:24 AM   #1
Igor_Passau
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“Flexitarian Diet”

(Ivanhoe Newswire) – South Beach, Atkins, Zone, Paleo – all were diet crazes that still remain largely popular today. Currently, dieticians and people everywhere are praising the flexitarian diet, a diet which places emphasis on eating more plant-based foods and less meat. Now, a study shows evidence for how beneficial this diet can really be.

People affected by Crohn’s disease, a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), have chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The inflammation causes the intestinal wall to become thick. Typical treatment for Crohn’s disease includes eating foods that don’t worsen symptoms, controlling stress, medication, and surgery. Unfortunately, surgery does not ultimately cure the disease.

A prospective, single center, 2-year clinical trial in Japan was conducted to see whether a semi-vegetarian diet (SVD) has a preventive effect against relapse of Crohn’s disease in patients who have achieved remission, who are a high-risk group for relapse.

Twenty-two adult with Crohn’s disease from ages 19 to 77 years old were recruited for the study, having achieved clinical remission either medically or surgically. They were broken up into two groups: those on an SVD diet, and those on an omnivorous diet. The SVD diet included daily intake of rice, vegetables, fruits, and occasional intake of fish, meat, and other animal-based foods. They also refrained from foods reported as risk factors for IBD like sweets, bread, dairy, and fast food. A diet that did not fulfill these two conditions was regarded as an omnivorous diet. Researchers used the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis to calculate the developing proportion of patients who had a relapse, analyzing the relapse rates of patients who followed an SVD and those who did not (an omnivorous diet group) for two years.

73% of the patients stuck with the SVD diet. 94% of the patients in the SVD group retained remission compared with 33% in the omnivorous group. The remission rate with the SVD was 100% at 1 year and 92% at 2 years. The SVD diet did not cause any problems in the patients.

Michael Greger, MD, founding member of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine, and Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States, told Ivanhoe about the importance of the study. "200 days into the study, all of the patients told to eat flexitarian were still in remission. About 20 percent of the group not told to eat anything different relapsed. After a year on a diet of semi-veg, they were still symptom free but the disease reemerged in about half of those on the standard diet. At the end of two years, 92% of the patients told to eat flexitarian remained without disease whereas a large majority of those not given those instructions relapsed back into cycles of drugs, hospitalizations, and surgery, a highly significant finding."

The concentration of C-reactive protein, an indicator of inflammation, was normal at the final visit in more than half of the patients on the SVD, which showed that more than half of the patients who continue the SVD will be free from relapse as long as they maintain their flexitarian diet.

This study distinguishes itself as one of the best results in relapse prevention. "Encouraging to cut back to less than a single serving of meat per week appears to be the best results in relapse remission ever recorded." Dr. Greger notes that even a few simple swaps can be good for your health. "Even just eating more fruits and vegetables can affect disease regression."

Source: 2012 77th Florida Dietetic Association Annual Symposium, July 2012

http://www.ivanhoe.com/channels/p_ch...?storyid=29706
07-13-2012, 06:33 AM   #2
nogutsnoglory
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Interesting because my GI said bread was soft and easy to digest.
07-13-2012, 12:20 PM   #3
kiny
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Thanks. Here is an old study about a low lipid diet.

What kind of stuff are those fat based vitamins that they sell suspended in anyway?




07-13-2012, 01:10 PM   #4
xmdmom
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Here's the full article on the Japanese study in case anyone wants to take a look at it. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2877178/

The authors of this study write this about the diet they used (SVD): "our diet was a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet[51]. Miso (fermented bean paste) soup, vegetables, fruits, legumes, potatoes, pickled vegetables, and plain yoghurt were served daily. Fish was served once a week and meat once every 2 wk, both at about a half the average amount. "

Take a look at figure 2 in the article to see a photo of daily meals. Sorry, I couldn't figure out how to put an image here. Below is a description of the meals.

A sample of a 1700-kcal/d semi-vegetarian diet (SVD) for Crohn’s disease (CD). From left to right, breakfast (A), lunch (B), and dinner (C). Boiled brown rice is seen at the bottom left of the tray and miso (fermented bean paste) soup is at the bottom right. Breakfast (A): Raw grated nagaimo (yam) and shredded toasted nori seaweed are at the top left; natto (fermented soybeans) and grated daikon (Japanese radish) are at the top right; and braised hijiki seaweed, nama-age (thick deep-fried beancurd), and edamame (young soybeans) are in the center; Lunch (B): Boiled potato, onion, and corn in tomato soup are at the top left; isomaki-tamago (dried nori seaweed inside egg roll) and boiled chrysanthemum with sesame dressing are at the top right; takuan (pickled radish) is in the center; and a mixture of banana and plain yoghurt is at the bottom right; Dinner (C): Boiled chingensai (qing gin cai), soybeans, and wakame seaweed with vinegar soy sauce dressing are at the top left; simmered ganmodoki (bean-curd-based mixture), tofu (bean curd), boiled egg, Japanese-variety eggplant, Japanese butterbur, Japanese-variety pumpkin, and snow peas are at the top right; and citrus fruit is in the center.
07-13-2012, 02:26 PM   #5
tiloah
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The SVD diet included daily intake of rice, vegetables, fruits, and occasional intake of fish, meat, and other animal-based foods. They also refrained from foods reported as risk factors for IBD like sweets, bread, dairy, and fast food. A diet that did not fulfill these two conditions was regarded as an omnivorous diet.
They should have controlled for this. Either by keeping those things also out of the omnivorous diet, or having a third (control) group, and even better a fourth group on the SVD who were allowed to eat those things. Frustrating. But I suppose the scope of the study can only go so far.
07-13-2012, 03:31 PM   #6
kiny
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Take a look at figure 2 in the article to see a photo of daily meals. Sorry, I couldn't figure out how to put an image here. Below is a description of the meals.

A sample of a 1700-kcal/d semi-vegetarian diet (SVD) for Crohn’s disease (CD). From left to right, breakfast (A), lunch (B), and dinner (C). Boiled brown rice is seen at the bottom left of the tray and miso (fermented bean paste) soup is at the bottom right. Breakfast (A): Raw grated nagaimo (yam) and shredded toasted nori seaweed are at the top left; natto (fermented soybeans) and grated daikon (Japanese radish) are at the top right; and braised hijiki seaweed, nama-age (thick deep-fried beancurd), and edamame (young soybeans) are in the center; Lunch (B): Boiled potato, onion, and corn in tomato soup are at the top left; isomaki-tamago (dried nori seaweed inside egg roll) and boiled chrysanthemum with sesame dressing are at the top right; takuan (pickled radish) is in the center; and a mixture of banana and plain yoghurt is at the bottom right; Dinner (C): Boiled chingensai (qing gin cai), soybeans, and wakame seaweed with vinegar soy sauce dressing are at the top left; simmered ganmodoki (bean-curd-based mixture), tofu (bean curd), boiled egg, Japanese-variety eggplant, Japanese butterbur, Japanese-variety pumpkin, and snow peas are at the top right; and citrus fruit is in the center.
07-16-2012, 09:59 PM   #7
puppylove
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very interesting, thanks for sharing! i agree with diesanduhr and would add that the sample size is small, but still... promising results!
07-20-2012, 02:50 AM   #8
PlutoCronie
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I'm already on a similar diet, but I don't tolerate any kind of rice well. I also stay away from nuts of any kind, and most breads. Fish I can eat in huge amount especially Tilapia. I haven't had red meat in months, but I tolerate chicken OK, although the skin is not too cool. Fruits and veggies work very well for me. I drink anti-inflammatory herbal teas daily. It is truly uncanny how as soon as I stray from the type of diet that works for me I flare up. I guess I am still experimenting, but at this point I have a pretty good idea of what foods and beverages will cause problems for me. I am still doing the high Alkaline diet together with the Blood Type diet. A lot of the same foods are on the Flextarian list. Anyway, good luck to everyone who goes the diet route. Personally, I feel I have more control over my health this way, rather than depending totally on Rx remedies, although I still take 1 Colazal daily, along with my vitamins and supplements.
__________________
Diagnosed with Crohn's Colitis in May 2011

Alternative Healing Regimen:
High Alkaline Diet; Alkaline Water; Herbal teas, especially Kombucha and Detox, for nutrition and inflammation; weekly internal cleansing (coffee) and internal probiotics/anti-inflammatory supplements, esp, Glucosamine; naturopathic and holistic lifestyle approach; color and music Tx.
Was initially diagnosed by a Gastroenterologist, but
currently only under the care of a GP due to lack of medical insurance.
07-20-2012, 06:18 AM   #9
xmdmom
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I'm curious, PlutoCronie, do you eat pickled and fermented foods daily?
07-20-2012, 07:32 PM   #10
PlutoCronie
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I'm curious, PlutoCronie, do you eat pickled and fermented foods daily?
Smart question! The closest I come to that regimen would be when I have Apple Cider Vinegar, and also yoghurt. I try to drink the Apple Cider Vinegar daily either as a tea, or with my room-temp/iced Alkaline Water. It is recommended that people who have our digestive problems do not drink beverages with ice, but I have to admit that with this heat wave I have not been always vigilant about this. I often add honey and lemon whether it is as a tea, room temp, or, iced.
As far as the yoghurt, I would eat Greek Yoghurt daily, but it is too expensive (as well as addictive. Yum!)
I have occasionally enjoyed sour pickles with garlic and should eat more of them. I have had no adverse reaction to them and they are probably good for me.
Thanks for your inquiry!
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