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Crohn's Disease Forum » Ulcerative Colitis Forum » Help me understand my colonoscopy findings


06-04-2012, 06:15 PM   #1
Fosterfamily2303
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Help me understand my colonoscopy findings

I just had my colonoscopy today and the doc gave me pics with the findings. It says patchy inflammation in descending colon, several erosions with granularity and erythema in the descending colon and sigmoid colon compatible with colitis, rectal polyp and polyps (2 mm) in the rectum. Biopsy was taken of the polyps and the erosion and erythema.

What the hell does all this mean?
06-04-2012, 07:17 PM   #2
Trysha
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Hello Foster
Your question will be fully answered when the biopsy results are available.
It could mean an infection, and could mean Crohn's., when is your next GI appointment.?
The polyps are better out than in and usually you don't have to worry for the majority of them, again the lab reports will define the types.
Feel better soon
Hugs and best wishes
Trysha
06-04-2012, 08:08 PM   #3
Fosterfamily2303
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Thank you Trysha for getting back to me.,.my gi appt is on the 16th. They will then go over the results. In so much pain...just can't wait for answers
06-04-2012, 09:56 PM   #4
Trysha
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Hi Foster
If your pain is bad you should call the GI and let them know.It may be possible for you to be given help sooner.
Also you could go to ER.
It is a bit shattering to be told some of the story and guessing is not the right way to go about things.We all do it though.
When in pain everything is magnified including fears of the unknown.
Once you are finally diagnosed and being treated it will get easier..
Feel better soon
Hugs
Trysha
06-05-2012, 09:42 AM   #5
Fosterfamily2303
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Thanks...they think it's just a flare and more less told me to be patient until biopsy comes back.

Anyone else have in put on this??
06-06-2012, 03:23 PM   #6
Hobbes650
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Hi FF!

Doctors will specifically looking for how deep your inflammation goes before making an official diagnosis. UC is a mucosal disease, meaning it will only effect the inside mucosa layeer. If the inlfammation goes deeper, it is not UC and could be a form of Chron's. That's an important differece as there are more drugs available to treat Chron's. Spottiness may actually be a good thing, but not sure. I was originally diagnosed with UC in my rectum, and it spread all the way through the entire colon over the next two months.

Wish you the best,
Hobbers650
06-06-2012, 05:40 PM   #7
Fosterfamily2303
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Thank you for that helpful information!!! My endo. Is Monday (6-11). Hope they find what there looking for so I get the right dx and get the right medication!
12-08-2012, 11:03 AM   #8
had_enough1980uk
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Hi FF!

Doctors will specifically looking for how deep your inflammation goes before making an official diagnosis. UC is a mucosal disease, meaning it will only effect the inside mucosa layeer. If the inlfammation goes deeper, it is not UC and could be a form of Crohn's. That's an important differece as there are more drugs available to treat Crohn's. Spottiness may actually be a good thing, but not sure. I was originally diagnosed with UC in my rectum, and it spread all the way through the entire colon over the next two months.

Wish you the best,
Hobbers650
That's really good information, thank you for posting this :-)
12-08-2012, 01:54 PM   #9
Hobbes650
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That's really good information, thank you for posting this :-)

There are other things to look at as well: presence of granulomas, polyps, anything that's not normal. I should have included this as well.
12-11-2015, 07:10 AM   #10
linx
 
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I just had my colonoscopy today and the doc gave me pics with the findings. It says patchy inflammation in descending colon, several erosions with granularity and erythema in the descending colon and sigmoid colon compatible with colitis, rectal polyp and polyps (2 mm) in the rectum. Biopsy was taken of the polyps and the erosion and erythema.

What the hell does all this mean?
Bowel polyps
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Overview
Polyps, bowel
Introduction

Bowel polyps are small growths on the inner lining of the colon (large bowel) or rectum. They are common, affecting 15-20% of the UK population, and don't usually cause symptoms.
Polyps are usually less than 1cm in size, although they can grow up to several centimetres. There are various forms:
some are a tiny raised area or bulge, known as a sessile polyp
some look like a grape on a stalk, known as a pedunculated polyp
some take the form of many tiny bumps clustered together
Bowel polyps are not usually cancerous, although if they're discovered they'll need to be removed, as some will eventually turn into cancer if left untreated.
Some people just develop one polyp, while others may have a few. They tend to occur in people over the age of 60.
How are they caused?
Bowel polyps are caused by an abnormal production of cells. The lining of the bowel constantly renews itself, and a faulty gene can cause the cells in the bowel lining to grow more quickly.
There may be a family tendency towards developing bowel polyps or bowel cancer.
What are the symptoms?
Most people with polyps won't be aware of them as they produce no symptoms and are often discovered by accident.
However, some larger polyps can cause:
a small amount of rectal bleeding (blood in your stool)
mucus to be produced when you open your bowels
diarrhoea or constipation
abdominal pain
How are they discovered?
Bowel polyps are usually found as a result of a bowel investigation for another reason, such as a sigmoidoscopy (examination of the last part of the bowel) or during screening for bowel cancer.
If polyps are found, a colonoscopy or CT colonography is needed to view the whole of the large bowel and remove any polyps.
How are they treated?
There are several methods for treating polyps, but the most common procedure involves snaring the polyp during a colonoscopy. Snaring is like cutting the polyp off with cheese wire and is painless.
Both of the above methods involve passing a flexible instrument called a colonoscope through your bottom and up into your bowel. The colonoscope has a wire with an electric current to either cauterise (burn off) or snare the polyp.
In rare cases, polyps may need to be treated by surgically removing part of the bowel. This is usually only done when the polyp has some cell changes or is particularly large.
After the polyp or polyps have been removed, they are sent to specialists in a laboratory, who will inform your consultant if:
the polyp has been completely removed
there is any risk of it regrowing
there is any cancerous change in the polyp
If there is a cancerous change in the polyp, you may need further treatment (depending on the degree and extent of change). Your specialist will be able to advise you on this.
Outlook
Some people will need further colonoscopies because polyps can recur. Polyps can sometimes run in families. This is uncommon, but means you'll need colonoscopy checks at regular intervals.
You might be asked to have repeat examinations at intervals of around three to five years to catch any further polyps that may develop and potentially turn into bowel cancer.

A polyp in the colon (large bowel)
Bowel cancer risk
Polyps are not usually cancerous. But if some types of polyps are not removed, they may eventually become cancerous. This takes many years to happen, however.
About 1 in 10 polyps will turn into cancer. These are called adenomas.
Most doctors think all bowel cancers develop from polyps.
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