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02-12-2013, 07:11 AM   #1
had_enough1980uk
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Food plan

Are there food plans out there that I can find out what intolerance I have?

Like...... Add cheese day 3 if diarrhea occur within one day you have a dairy intolerance etc

I have diarrhea every morning now. Tried everything but play about with my diet. I know I am not wheat intolerant from my blood tests

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02-13-2013, 08:31 AM   #2
had_enough1980uk
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Anyone??

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02-13-2013, 08:41 AM   #3
KWalker
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Hmm, I think the best would be to start with a diet with very little in it and then slowly add things and see how you react. Unfortunately though this won't be an over night type of plan and will take some time. It's tricky because if you eat a normal diet I think it would be hard to pin point what is causing the problems so if you start slowly with little foods it would be easier to determine what food causes problems if you show symptoms after adding them in.
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02-13-2013, 09:19 AM   #4
AuntieEm
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I'm needing to research an elemination diet too.
02-13-2013, 11:55 AM   #5
Ya noy
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There is not just one elimination to follow, because everyone is allergic to different things. You have to start with a food or foods that you know you can eat, and then gradually start adding back other foods to see whether they cause a reaction.

But just so you know, allergies can "wax and wane" meaning allegies can come and go, and that your body may not always react to substances that cause allergic reactions at other times. I went to allergists for years, who ran every test imaginable repeatedly, and they were never really able to make a determination.

Normally you can figure it out pretty quick though.
02-13-2013, 11:59 AM   #6
mnsun
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Not aware of a plan. I would suggest eliminating milk, red meat and wheat/grains and slowly introduce each separately. These seem to be the more common "intolerances". Other than that, I would be sure to avoid processed foods (sugars both real and fake, refined carbos like white flour, maltodextrin, nitrites, hydrogenated oils, etc.). Eat high protein diet.
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02-15-2013, 09:19 AM   #7
mnsun
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See here in the "Elimination Diet" heading: [url]
http://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/021313p38.shtml

*LINK SHOULD WORK NOW*

This approach, of cutting out foods for 4-6 weeks before careful reintro, could possibly help out IBD as well as rheumatoid arthritis and akylosing spondylitis. It involves addressing SIBO and healing leaky gut thereby stopping antigens from entering the blood and overactivating the immune system by first eliminating problem foods and stealth ingredients in processed/GMO foods. Some may need to cut out high-FODMAP foods (see: http://www.crohnsforum.com/wiki/Low-FODMAP-Diet & http://www.crohnsforum.com/showthread.php?t=28374 )

This involves eliminating grains/wheat (containing gluten and gliadin that stimulate damaging zonulin release), soy, nuts, eggs(these containing other allergenic "large" proteins), nightshade vegetables (glycoalkaloids in: white potatoes, bell peppers, tomatoes, eggplant, etc.), dairy, and processed products containing proteins that may cause leaky gut. It is possible to have an undetectable non-celiac gluten sensitivity--it is 6x more prevalent. SIBO can sometimes be diagnosed by breath tests.

"During the elimination phase, Kubal says that “focusing on real, whole foods that haven’t undergone extensive processing or genetic modification is important for both maintaining and healing the gut” and that “lean or pastured animal proteins, vegetables, some fruit, and healthy fats help to promote intestinal and overall health...Typical meals during the elimination diet phase should include nutrient-dense and anti-inflammatory foods with a low allergenic potential, such as chicken salads with leafy greens, avocado and olive oil-based vinaigrette, hearty stews of lean beef with a side dish of cauliflower, or grilled salmon sprinkled with lemon juice and served with a side of vegetables stir-fried in coconut oil."

The aforementioned foods should be systematically reintroduced--once better mood, energy and digestion are experienced--by including each slowly for a week at a time while increasing intake and noting changes in dig/ener/mood. Sometimes you can heal enough to the point of toleration after long enough abstention, but always be weary which were problematic.

Last edited by mnsun; 02-19-2013 at 01:07 PM.
02-15-2013, 04:21 PM   #8
had_enough1980uk
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Thanks everyone, I will look into all the stuff mentioned... :-)

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02-16-2013, 07:02 PM   #9
had_enough1980uk
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See here in the "Elimination Diet" heading: http://www.todaysdietitian.com/newar...21313p38.shtml

This approach, of cutting out foods for 4-6 weeks before careful reintro, could possibly help out IBD as well as rheumatoid arthritis and akylosing spondylitis. It involves addressing SIBO and healing leaky gut thereby stopping antigens from entering the blood and overactivating the immune system by first eliminating problem foods and stealth ingredients in processed/GMO foods. Some may need to cut out high-FODMAP foods (see: http://www.crohnsforum.com/wiki/Low-FODMAP-Diet & http://www.crohnsforum.com/showthread.php?t=28374 )

This involves eliminating grains/wheat (containing gluten and gliadin that stimulate damaging zonulin release), soy, nuts, eggs(these containing other allergenic "large" proteins), nightshade vegetables (glycoalkaloids in: white potatoes, bell peppers, tomatoes, eggplant, etc.), dairy, and processed products containing proteins that may cause leaky gut. It is possible to have an undetectable non-celiac gluten sensitivity--it is 6x more prevalent. SIBO can sometimes be diagnosed by breath tests.

"During the elimination phase, Kubal says that “focusing on real, whole foods that haven’t undergone extensive processing or genetic modification is important for both maintaining and healing the gut” and that “lean or pastured animal proteins, vegetables, some fruit, and healthy fats help to promote intestinal and overall health...Typical meals during the elimination diet phase should include nutrient-dense and anti-inflammatory foods with a low allergenic potential, such as chicken salads with leafy greens, avocado and olive oil-based vinaigrette, hearty stews of lean beef with a side dish of cauliflower, or grilled salmon sprinkled with lemon juice and served with a side of vegetables stir-fried in coconut oil."

The aforementioned foods should be systematically reintroduced--once better mood, energy and digestion are experienced--by including each slowly for a week at a time while increasing intake and noting changes in dig/ener/mood. Sometimes you can heal enough to the point of toleration after long enough abstention, but always be weary which were problematic.
The top link didnt work
02-16-2013, 11:31 PM   #10
Sarah50
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Are there food plans out there that I can find out what intolerance I have?

Like...... Add cheese day 3 if diarrhea occur within one day you have a dairy intolerance etc

I have diarrhea every morning now. Tried everything but play about with my diet. I know I am not wheat intolerant from my blood tests

2
If you feel like it, read this page on the link below - it has great info about what to eat when you're flaring with either colitis or crohn's and what to eat after flare - especially good info when you have diarrhea.

"Diet Recommendations for Ulcerative Colitis Flare"

"Diet Progression Following Flares for Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease"

http://www.ucsfhealth.org/education/...ase/index.html
02-17-2013, 12:12 AM   #11
AuntieEm
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http://www.todaysdietitian.com/newar...21313p38.shtml

I found the page see if this link works for the article (I'll try it 2 ways).

http://www.todaysdietitian.com/newar...21313p38.shtml


It is a february article in Todays Dietitian Magazine
02-17-2013, 12:19 AM   #12
AuntieEm
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Interesting link Sarah. TY
02-17-2013, 12:45 AM   #13
Susan2
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I think we have to also take into consideration that we are not just talking about actual allergies. I, for example, am not allergic to cinnamon, bur it really irritates my gut, as does coconut - and a number of other things. And these things seem to vary from one Crohnie to another, so finding out what foods cause you short term and/or long-term problems is a very personal journey.
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02-17-2013, 03:44 AM   #14
AuntieEm
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That is why I have found no set diet works for me, Susan... and am looking at the long tedious path of an elimination diet. Not for allergies, but for triggers in my gut. I think that will be the only way to find the true foods that do and don't work for my CD.

My daughter has been adjusting her diet for histamine intolerance as well as for my granddaughter. She has been encouraging me to look into the same.
http://www.histamine-intolerance.info/ I'm sure I have suffered from this for many years as well leading up to the actual crohn's disease. They've been working through the elimination diet for a year now. It has been helping in many areas.

Auntie Em
02-17-2013, 03:59 AM   #15
AuntieEm
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Do any other crohnies suffer from a naturally occuring high histamine level in their system?
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