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Crohn's Disease Forum » Parents of Kids with IBD » Paediatric IBD - Articles and Research


 
03-16-2013, 10:39 AM   #61
my little penguin
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03-16-2013, 10:04 PM   #62
CarolinAlaska
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Thought this was a great link that vtfamily posted.

Clinical Imaging of the Small Intestine

http://books.google.com/books?id=sOr...0bowel&f=false
This link didn't work for me.
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J's story: http://apathnotchosen.blogspot.com
*J, 18, Crohn's diagnosis 1-2013 (age13), taking pred only. NG feedings nightly.
Osteoporosis/osteopenia, Scoliosis, EDS, Asthma, Epilepsy, Hla B-27 positive, gluten intolerant, thrombophlebitis, c.diff, depression, anxiety, postural tachycardia/POTS and multiple food allergies.
03-16-2013, 10:31 PM   #63
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Abstract
Background and aims
Total enteral nutrition (TEN) with a liquid formula can suppress gut inflammation and induce remission in active Crohn's disease. The mechanism is obscure. Studies have suggested that long term nutritional supplementation with a liquid formula (partial enteral nutrition (PEN)) may also suppress inflammation and prevent relapse. The aim of this study was to compare PEN with conventional TEN in active Crohn's disease.
Patients and methods
Fifty children with a paediatric Crohn's disease activity index (PCDAI) >20 were randomly assigned to receive 50% (PEN) or 100% (TEN) of their energy requirement as elemental formula for six weeks. The PEN group was encouraged to eat an unrestricted diet while those receiving TEN were not allowed to eat. The primary outcome was achievement of remission (PCDAI <10). Secondary analyses of changes in erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C reactive protein, albumin, and platelets were performed to look for evidence of anti‐inflammatory effects.
Results
remission rate with PEN was lower than with TEN (15% v 42%; p=0.035). Although PCDAI fell in both groups (p=0.001 for both), the reduction was greater with TEN (p=0.005). Moreover, the fall in PCDAI with PEN was due to symptomatic and nutritional benefits. With both treatments there were significant improvements in relation to abdominal pain, “sense of wellbeing”, and nutritional status. However, only TEN led to a reduction in diarrhoea (p=0.02), an increase in haemoglobin and albumin, and a fall in platelets and ESR.
Conclusions
TEN suppresses inflammation in active Crohn's disease but PEN does not. This suggests that long term nutritional supplementation, although beneficial to some patients, is unlikely to suppress inflammation and so prevent disease relapse.
Keywords: Crohn's disease, enteral nutrition, elemental diet, children
Gut. 2006 March; 55(3): 356–361.
doi: 10.1136/gut.2004.062554
PMCID: PMC1856067
Treatment of active Crohn's disease in children using partial enteral nutrition with liquid formula: a randomised controlled trial

T Johnson, S Macdonald, S M Hill, A Thomas, and M S Murphy


From:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1856067/

Last edited by DustyKat; 08-18-2013 at 03:04 AM. Reason: Added to list
03-16-2013, 10:55 PM   #64
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Clinical Imaging of the Small Intestine

http://books.google.com/books?id=sOr...0bowel&f=false
This link didn't work for me.

Here is the link again...

http://books.google.ca/books?id=sOrK...0bowel&f=false


If it still doesn't work, here is the link to the original thread and the post number...

http://www.crohnsforum.com/showthrea...t=48067&page=9 , post #244
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Tess, mom to S, 22
Diagnosed May 2011

Treatment:
May-July 2011 - 6 wks Exclusive EN via NG tube - 2000 ml/night, 1 wk IV Flagyl
July 2011-July 2013 - Supplemental EN via NG, 1000 ml/night, 5 nites/wk, Nexium, 40 mg
Feb. 2013-present - Remicade, 5 mg/kg every 6 wks
Supplements: 1-2 Boost shakes, D3 - 2000 IUs, Krill Oil

Last edited by DustyKat; 08-18-2013 at 03:05 AM. Reason: Added to list
03-19-2013, 09:45 AM   #65
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This is not directly IBD related but I thought it was very interesting. The insight some educational facilities have on chronic illness is over shawdowed by their inability to institute programs through their disability offices to those that have chronic illness. Notice the uptick in UC/CD cases discussed.

Reaching Students with Chronic Illness
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C age 19
dx March 2012 CD

CURRENT MEDS: MTX injections, Stelara


Dx May 2014: JSpA
8/2014 ileocecectomy
9/2017 G tube

PAST MEDS: remicade, oral mtx, humira

Last edited by DustyKat; 08-18-2013 at 03:07 AM. Reason: Added to list
03-19-2013, 10:50 AM   #66
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Thanks Clash, the boys grandpa graduated from DePaul. I've got a few years but Jack is already talking about what college he wants to go to.
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Jacqui

Mom to Jack (18) dx Crohn's 2/2010
Vitamin D -2000mg
Remicade - started 1/9/14; 7.5ml/kg every 6 weeks
Centrum for Him teen multivitamin
Past meds: Imuran/Azathioprine; allopurinol; methotrexate; LDN; Prednisone; Apriso; Pentasa; EEN

Husband dx Crohn's 3/1993
currently none due to liver issues
03-19-2013, 11:06 AM   #67
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Funny, my brother who has Crohn's, went to law school at DePaul.
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Supermom to 2 girls: Little Girl (4) & Big Girl (7)

Little Girl: Undiagnosed (scope 4/12: non-specific inflammation in TI & colon, gastritis & h. pylori in stomach), Asthma, Food Allergies
Sulfasalazine, Miralax, Folic Acid, Zyrtec, inhalers
03-26-2013, 03:58 PM   #68
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Opportunistic infection in immunocompromised IBD patients:

http://www.naspghan.org/user-assets/...20NASPGHAN.pdf

Last edited by DustyKat; 08-18-2013 at 03:09 AM. Reason: Added to list
03-30-2013, 08:15 AM   #69
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Humira study

Last edited by DustyKat; 08-18-2013 at 03:11 AM. Reason: Added to list
03-30-2013, 09:39 PM   #70
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OBJECTIVES: The use of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-) antagonists has changed the therapeutic strategy for Crohn's disease (CD). Adalimumab (ADA), a fully human anti-TNF- monoclonal antibody, is an effective therapy for patients with CD, both naive patients and those intolerant or refractory to Infliximab (IFX), a chimeric anti-TNF- agent. However, the use of ADA is rarely reported in pediatric CD. We performed an open prospective evaluation of short- and long-term efficacy and safety of ADA in children with moderate-to-severe CD.
METHODS: A total of 23 pediatric CD patients (9 naive and 14 intolerant or unresponsive to IFX) received ADA subcutaneously as a loading schedule at weeks 0 and 2, and at every other week (eow) during a 48-week maintenance phase. Loading and maintenance doses were 160/80 and 80 mg eow in 13 cases, 120/80 and 80 mg eow in 2, and 80/40 and 40 mg eow in 8 cases. The primary efficacy outcomes were clinical remission and response at different scheduled visits along the maintenance phase. At baseline, 13 patients also received immunomodulators (IMs).
RESULTS: At weeks 2, 4, 12, 24, and 48, remission rates were 36.3, 60.8, 30.5, 50, and 65.2%, respectively, whereas response rates were 87, 88, 70, 86, and 91%, respectively. Four patients at week 24 and 2 at week 48 received IMs; the mean daily corticosteroid dose, disease activity index, C-reactive protein level, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate decreased significantly throughout the trial. No serious adverse events were recorded.
CONCLUSIONS: ADA can be an effective and safe biological agent for inducing and maintaining remission in children with moderate-to-severe CD, even in those with previous IFX therapy.
Subject Category: Pediatrics

Am J Gastroenterol 2009; 104:2566–2571; doi:10.1038/ajg.2009.372; published online 23 June 2009

Efficacy of Adalimumab in Moderate-to-Severe Pediatric Crohn's Disease

Franca Viola MD1, Fortunata Civitelli MD1, Giovanni Di Nardo MD1, Maria Beatrice Barbato MD1, Osvaldo Borrelli MD1, Salvatore Oliva MD1, Francesca Conte MD1 and Salvatore Cucchiara MD, PhD1

1Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Gastroenterology and Liver Unit, University Hospital Umberto I, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy




From
http://www.nature.com/ajg/journal/v1...g2009372a.html

Last edited by DustyKat; 08-18-2013 at 03:13 AM. Reason: Added to list
04-17-2013, 04:43 PM   #71
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While surgical resection remains a mainstay of the treatment of Crohn’s disease (CD),
postoperative recurrence of disease is common. The ideal management of patients after
surgery is unclear and varies widely in clinical practice. Both patients and clinicians
must weigh the risks and benefits of treatment in reaching a decision. Those at low risk
of postoperative recurrence may not need any therapy while those at moderate risk of
disease recurrence may be treated with immunomodulator therapy. Patients with the
highest risk for recurrence should ideally be treated with biologic therapy. Regardless
of risk, all patients should undergo ileocolonoscopic surveillance at 6–12 months after
surgery. This review will outline the current evidence for various medical therapies in
the prevention of postsurgical recurrence and outline a management algorithm of these
patients based on risk stratification.
A Review of Postoperative
Crohn’s Disease


from:
http://www.practicalgastro.com/pdf/M...insArticle.pdf

Last edited by DustyKat; 08-18-2013 at 03:15 AM. Reason: Added to list
05-14-2013, 11:07 PM   #72
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A newspaper article I came across last week on a SSI. I found it interesting and it filled me with hope for better treatments in the future.

http://blogs.vancouversun.com/2013/0...an-old-theory/
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Son (age 13) diagnosed with Crohn's Feb. 2012.
Currently on Imuran and Sulfasalazine.

Also taking: TuZen probiotic and following a low FODMAP diet (not very strictly).

Past Treatments: Prednisone, Flagyl, Cipro, Pentasa, exclusive EN via NG tube (6 weeks), Prevacid, Iberogast (20 drops twice a day) and high doses of vitamin B2.

Last edited by DustyKat; 08-18-2013 at 03:37 AM. Reason: Added to list
05-17-2013, 10:58 PM   #73
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http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/781002_2

Pediactric pouch
Uc
Medscape
( need login but its free)

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06-14-2013, 10:23 AM   #74
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Crohns Disease - First Visit with GI (checklist)


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3079145/

Last edited by DustyKat; 08-18-2013 at 03:40 AM. Reason: Added to list
06-14-2013, 10:33 AM   #75
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Vaccination Issues in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Receiving Immunosuppression

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3533208/

Last edited by DustyKat; 08-18-2013 at 03:41 AM. Reason: Added to list
06-14-2013, 10:46 AM   #76
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Vaccines and recommendations for their use in inflammatory bowel disease

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3602494/

Last edited by DustyKat; 08-18-2013 at 03:42 AM. Reason: Added to list
07-05-2013, 07:40 AM   #77
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I posted this in the main research section. Thought i would post it here for the other parents. You can listen to the story, it is about 3 and a half minutes and more in depth than the written piece. Story is easy to follow. I found it really interesting.
http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2013...us-for-decades

There is so much stuff coming out about the human biome. I personally believe the answer to crohns lies in the gut flora.

http://www.crohnsforum.com/showthread.php?t=53223

Gut Bacteria We Pick Up As Kids Stick With Us For Decades
Most of the microbes in our guts appear to remain stable for years, perhaps even most of our lives, researchers reported Thursday.

An analysis of the bacteria in the digestive systems of 37 healthy women over a period of about five years found, for the most part, little variation over time, says molecular biologist Jeffrey Gordon of the Washington University School of Medicine, who led the research. As decades-long internal companions, Gordon says, many microbes "are in a position to shape our lives, to promote our health or, in certain circumstances, contribute to risk for disease."

Scientists have known for a long time that we all carry around bacteria that help us digest our food. But they apparently do lots of other things for us too.

"These are cells that are important parts of ourselves," Gordon says. "And they contribute to our health."

There's always been one big question about the microbes, he says: "Once these communities are formed, how long do they endure? What is the stability in healthy individuals?"

To try to get a sense of that, Gordon and his colleagues developed a new type of "gut check": a genetic analysis Gordon calls "a bar code of life." The technique involves repeatedly analyzing all the variations in a particular bacterial gene. Because each strain of bacteria carries a slightly different form of the gene, the forms act almost like name tags or "bar codes" that identify which strains are present.

The method is "a way of classifying organisms represented in an individual's gut community in a moment of time and over time," Gordon says.

Being able to test gut microbes from time to time could eventually prove to be a useful part of a checkup, Gordon says. For example, in the current study, published in this week's issue of the journal Science, Gordon and his team found that when several women lost weight, the makeup of their gut bacteria slightly shifted (though the scientists couldn't tell which came first — the weight loss, or the bacterial shift).

"By looking at someone's intestine we could pretty much tell how much weight they had lost or gained without having to put them on a scale," says Jeremiah Faith of Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, who helped conduct the study.

Another intriguing finding was that people's microbes seem to run in families — much as genes do. The researchers found more similarities in the gut microbes of related women — such as sisters, or a mother and her daughter — than among women who were not related.

"For everyone that we checked we were able to identify strains of bacteria that were shared between related individuals, which suggests that [they] had these microbes for a long time because many of these [relatives] lived far apart from each other now," Faith says.

The finding corroborates earlier work suggesting that our microbial communities tend to form early in life, largely from microbes we get from our mothers and other close relatives when we are young.

"In the same way our genome defines who we are, one could say that the microbial populations that inhabit us define who we are," says Eric Pamer of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York.

Because all the women in the study were healthy, the researchers did not examine what happens to our microbes when we do things like take antibiotics or probiotics. Stay tuned for future research.
__________________
Son (age 13) dx Crohn's October 2011 (age 10)
Azathioprine 10/2011-11/2012
Remicade October 2012
krill oil, multivitamin, liquid Vitamin D/Calcium/Magnesium, zinc, pro-thera complete probiotic.

"The decision to have a child is to accept that your heart will forever walk about outside of your body" Katherine Hadley

Last edited by DustyKat; 08-18-2013 at 03:44 AM. Reason: Added to list
08-11-2013, 09:28 PM   #78
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Anatomy and Histology of the Small and Large Intestine

http://jpck.zju.edu.cn/jcyxjp/files/ge/05/MT/0511.pdf
08-13-2013, 04:49 PM   #79
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During a heat wave, there is more to worry about than just heat stroke: Flares of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and bouts of infectious gastroenteritis (IG) are things to consider as well, according to a study from Zurich, Switzerland, published online August 13 in the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

"There is evidence for an increase of IBD hospital admissions by 4-6 percent for each additional day within a heat wave period," Christine N. Manser, MD, from the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital, Zurich, and colleagues said in a new release. "Presence of a heat wave was estimated to increase the risk of [IG] by 4-7 percent for every additional day within a heat [wave] period. In the control group there was no evidence for a heat wave effect."

from:
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/809363


Medscape Medical News
Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Heat Waves Linked to Flares
Joanna Broder
Aug 13, 2013

Last edited by DustyKat; 08-18-2013 at 03:48 AM. Reason: Added to list
08-17-2013, 09:36 PM   #80
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RESULTS: At the time of diagnosis in children, CD involved small bowel and colon (L3) in 51% (138/273), colon (L2) in 36%, and ileum (L1) in 6%; the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract (L4) was also affected in 51%. In 39%, the anatomic extent increased within 2 years. Behavioral characteristics progressed; 24% of children developed stricturing or penetrating complications within 4 years (vs 9% at diagnosis; P < .0001; odds ratio [OR], 3.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.86-5.92). Compared with adults, childhood-onset disease was characterized by a "panenteric" phenotype (ileocolonic plus upper GI [L3+L4]; 43% vs 3%; P < .0001; OR, 23.36; 95% CI, 13.45-40.59) with less isolated ileal (L1; 2% vs 31%; P < .0001; OR, 0.06; 95% CI, 0.03-0.12) or colonic disease (L2; 15% vs 36%; P < .0001; OR, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.21-0.46). UC was extensive in 82% of the children at diagnosis, versus 48% of adults (P < .0001; OR, 5.08; 95% CI, 2.73-9.45); 46% of the children progressed to develop extensive colitis during follow-up. Forty-six percent of children with CD and 35% with UC required immunomodulatory therapy within 12 months of diagnosis. The median time to first surgery was longer in childhood-onset than adult-onset patients with CD (13.7 vs 7.8 years; P < .001); the reverse was true for UC.


Definition of phenotypic characteristics of childhood-onset inflammatory bowel disease.

Authors
Van Limbergen J, Russell RK, Drummond HE, Aldhous MC, Round NK, Nimmo ER, Smith L, Gillett PM, McGrogan P, Weaver LT, Bisset WM, Mahdi G, Arnott ID, Satsangi J, Wilson DC.
Journal
Gastroenterology. 2008 Oct;135(4):1114-22. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2008.06.081. Epub 2008 Jul 3.




From:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed...644819/related

Last edited by DustyKat; 08-18-2013 at 03:51 AM. Reason: Added to list
08-18-2013, 03:57 AM   #81
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Anatomy and Histology of the Small and Large Intestine

http://jpck.zju.edu.cn/jcyxjp/files/ge/05/MT/0511.pdf
Hey Tess, I couldn't get this link to work.

Thank you to everyone for the continued contributions being made!

It would be remiss of me not to make special mention of my little penguin who has provided an inordinate amount of information to the members here. A big thank you to you mlp!

*List updated.

Dusty.
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08-18-2013, 07:47 PM   #82
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Faecal calprotectin limitations for diagnosing paediatric Crohn's

Faecal calprotectin is a validated screening test for intestinal inflammation in Crohn's disease.

A study conducted by Dr Arie Levine and colleagues from Israel prospectively evaluated the limitations of faecal calprotectin for identifying Crohn's disease among newly diagnosed untreated paediatric patients.

Additionally, the team evaluated the association of faecal calprotectin levels with disease location and serum inflammatory markers.

Consecutive children with new onset untreated Crohn's disease participating in the ongoing ESPGHAN GROWTH Crohn's disease study were evaluated at diagnosis for disease activity, extent, C-reactive protein (CRP), and faecal calprotectin.

A total of 60 children met the inclusion criteria. Of this, 25 had mild disease, 17 with moderate disease, and 18 with severe disease.

The researchers found that 45% had small bowel disease only.

Median faecal calprotectin levels did not differ between children with small bowel only, and those with colonic involvement.

Faecal calprotectin was elevated in 95% of patients, in comparison to CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate.

The researchers found that 5% of children who had normal calprotectin levels also had low or normal CRP and/or ESR.

There was no correlation between calprotectin levels and either the paediatric Crohn's disease activity index or physicians global assessment.

The study concluded faecal calprotectin levels in active disease confined to the small bowel appeared elevated in the vast majority of paediatric patients and site of disease were not a confounding factor in this setting.

Additionally, patients with low faecal calprotectin presented a trend toward low levels of inflammatory markers.

However, the study did not find a significant correlation between faecal calprotectin and clinical indices of activity.

http://www.gesa.org.au/news.asp?id=332

Dusty.
08-18-2013, 09:02 PM   #83
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Anatomy and Histology of Small and Large Intestine.pdf

Not sure why link didn't work... can you read this file?
08-18-2013, 09:14 PM   #84
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Attachment 2105

Not sure why link didn't work... can you read this file?
I couldn't get the link to work either....But l can see the file.. thanks
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Daughter dx CD March2012...
(aged 14)

Currently on:
40mg Humira
125mg Imuran




Dx Premature Ovarian Failure 2014



08-18-2013, 09:50 PM   #85
my little penguin
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Tess the link doesn't work
But the PDF file opens just fine for me .
08-21-2013, 09:06 PM   #86
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The Pediatric Pouch in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Abstract:
Pediatric severe ulcerative colitis that is resistant to current medical treatment can successfully be managed surgically with a colectomy, ileal pouch creation and pouch–anal anastomosis. Key issues that should be considered and discussed before the pouch option can be offered include alternative surgical procedures, pouch function expectations, risk of surgical leak, pelvic sepsis, anastomotic strictures, acute and chronic pouch inflammation, Crohn's disease of the pouch and risk of reduced fertility for females. A long-term risk is malignancy of the residual colonic tissue. The decision to proceed with a pouch or not poses a substantial emotional burden to the child and family. Despite the risk of surgical complications and pouch inflammatory and functional challenges, the overwhelming majority of children and their families are satisfied with their pouch surgery outcomes. Further study is needed to assess preoperative risk predictors, prevention and treatment of complications.

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/781002

Sign up to view the full article, it is free.

Dusty.
09-08-2013, 02:03 PM   #87
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Kiny posted this article in the Books, Research... forum. I thought it was quite interesting and another indication that EN is helpful in maintaining remission...

Effectiveness of concomitant enteral nutrition therapy and infliximab for maintenance treatment of Crohn's disease in adults.


http://www.crohnsforum.com/showthread.php?t=55580
09-10-2013, 12:10 PM   #88
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Looking for something and came across lots of articles... too many to link all of them so, here's the link to the publication

http://journals.lww.com/jpgn/toc/2011/01000


Physician Attitudes and Practices of Enteral Nutrition as Primary Treatment of Paediatric Crohn Disease in North America
http://journals.lww.com/jpgn/Fulltex...Enteral.9.aspx




Enteral Nutrition: The Neglected Primary Therapy of Active Crohn's Disease

http://journals.lww.com/jpgn/Fulltex...Therapy.3.aspx


Enteral Nutrition and Corticosteroids in the Treatment of Acute Crohn's Disease in Children
http://journals.lww.com/jpgn/Fulltex..._in_the.5.aspx


Growth, Body Composition, and Nutritional Status in Children and Adolescents With Crohn's Disease
http://journals.lww.com/jpgn/Fulltex..._Status.9.aspx

Last edited by Tesscorm; 09-10-2013 at 12:31 PM.
09-10-2013, 02:00 PM   #89
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Definitions of different types of Enteral Formulas


http://www.thriverx.net/PDFs/Adult%2...20Formulas.pdf
10-10-2013, 01:29 PM   #90
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ABSTRACT AND INTRODUCTION
Abstract

Objectives: Several anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) antibodies have demonstrated efficacy in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). These drugs carry the theoretical risk of opportunistic infection, but no systematic review and meta-analysis has examined this issue specifically.

Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane central register of controlled trials were searched (through to November 2012). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) recruiting adults with active or quiescent CD or UC comparing anti-TNFα therapy with placebo were eligible. Dichotomous data were pooled to obtain a relative risk (RR) of opportunistic infection, with a 95% confidence interval (CI). The number needed to harm (NNH) was estimated from the reciprocal of the risk difference from the meta-analysis.

Results: The search strategy identified 20,563 citations, 21 of which were eligible, reporting 22 separate RCTs with between 2 and 56 weeks of follow-up. In total, there were 39 (0.9%) opportunistic infections among 4,135 patients allocated to anti-TNFα therapy, compared with 9 (0.3%) among 2,919 assigned to placebo. Among patients receiving active therapy these included eight cases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, eight cases of herpes simplex infection, six cases of oral or esophageal candidiasis, six cases of herpes zoster infection, two cases of varicella-zoster virus infection, two cases of cytomegalovirus or Epstein–Barr virus infection, and one case of Nocardia infection. The RR of developing an opportunistic infection was significantly higher with anti-TNFα therapy (2.05; 95% CI 1.10–3.85, NNH=500; 95% CI 200–1,567). The RR of tuberculosis infection was 2.52 (95% CI 0.62–10.21).

Conclusions: Anti-TNF therapy doubles the risk of opportunistic infections in inflammatory bowel disease patients. This underlines the importance of adherence to guidelines for their prevention and management.



From

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/...l&uac=185734DZ






Opportunistic Infections With Anti-tumor Necrosis Factor-α Therapy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease
META-ANALYSIS OF RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIALS
Alexander C Ford MBChB, MD, FRCP, Laurent Peyrin-Biroulet MD, PhDDisclosures
Am J Gastroenterol. 2013;8(8):1268-1276.
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