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12-28-2014, 06:28 PM   #301
NothingL
 
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wildbill, can you update us on your status. Are you seeing any results?
12-29-2014, 05:40 PM   #302
wildbill_52280
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wildbill, can you update us on your status. Are you seeing any results?
I promised to update and its been over a week so I apologize. There have been no dramatic improvements for this second oral FMT, it's been 2 weeks post procedure, I was actually waiting a few more days to wait and see if i could notice at least any minor improvements because the last time it took me 2-3 weeks before i could say with confidence i had improved in any way, so it's still a little early to say, but what i can say is there have been no dramatic improvements, it's looking like ill be doing it again, this time with strict diet guidelines for my donor. I suspect having the donor follow a strict diet high in fiber is critical now, even though I always felt this way, The donor i'm dealing with isn't very keen on taking advice or following directions, so i didn't push the demands too hard, if I use the same donor again ill have to really push the issue.

For the record me as the patient i am following an extremely high fiber diet for example 3 cups of cooked broccoli and cauliflower , 300 calories of whole rolled oats, 600 calories of whole wheat this is what i eat daily made from scratch so im not eating "whole wheat" bread which is actually only 50% whole wheat and 50% refined wheat, im making foods products from 100% whole wheat which is about 6x higher in fiber.

Also, I've experienced very little negative side effects this second time compared to the first time, so i can only speak for my own experiences here but its generally been safe for me, that's not to say anyone should enter doing this without some knowledge or taking precautions, buts that another benefit of hearing about my experiences, to make it easier for other people to do it safely, diminish fears and in my own little way, advance our knowledge about restoring the microbiome with a fecal transplant.

There is still a slight chance i may have experienced some benefits from this recent oral FMT, I seem to be able to sleep longer but ill have to review my notes over the past 4 weeks to see what my averages are, but that's about it. But what i was hoping for was an ultra-efficiently performed fecal transplant with one orally administered dose leading to a dramatic turn around enabling me to digest normal foods again without increasing disease symptoms, a return of normal energy levels. I promise you i will find a way to do this and I'm much closer then ever before.
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Learn How Fecal transplants restore good bacteria that regulate inflammation to induce remission and how it has potential to be a cure for IBD in the future. Follow the link below.
http://www.crohnsforum.com/showthread.php?t=52400

Last edited by wildbill_52280; 12-29-2014 at 11:19 PM.
12-29-2014, 11:09 PM   #303
NothingL
 
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Thanks for keeping us updated, I suffer from digestive problems myself and will be doing an FMT soon.
12-30-2014, 10:18 AM   #304
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Good luck with that, Nothing. keep us informed please.
01-01-2015, 01:48 PM   #305
7vNH
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...

But what i was hoping for was an ultra-efficiently performed fecal transplant with one orally administered dose leading to a dramatic turn around enabling me to digest normal foods again without increasing disease symptoms, a return of normal energy levels. I promise you i will find a way to do this and I'm much closer then ever before.
Your protocol does not include pre-treating with antibiotics, right? I was thinking that might be a good idea...knock DOWN (it's impossible to knock OUT) the current set of gut bacteria so the introduced set can get a foot hold. I know Borody's protocol includes antibiotics, and other protocols use 'rinsing' techniques including 14 doses of MiraLAX in just a few hours as well as colonic lavage. It seems like the idea is to drop the numbers of the existing microbiome as low as possible before the new microbiome is introduced.
01-01-2015, 04:53 PM   #306
wildbill_52280
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Your protocol does not include pre-treating with antibiotics, right? I was thinking that might be a good idea...knock DOWN (it's impossible to knock OUT) the current set of gut bacteria so the introduced set can get a foot hold. I know Borody's protocol includes antibiotics, and other protocols use 'rinsing' techniques including 14 doses of MiraLAX in just a few hours as well as colonic lavage. It seems like the idea is to drop the numbers of the existing microbiome as low as possible before the new microbiome is introduced.
I do recall borodys FMT protocol for the first study on U.C. was similar to what you just described, I'm aware of all these things. I'm not sure how easy it is to obtain antibiotics from a doctor to do something that isn't regarded as a medical necessity, that may be considered malpractice in a doctors eyes, and they wouldn't take part unless they were specifically conducting research on FMT. So obtaining antibiotics for this purpose is kind of an unrealistic goal to achieve and seems difficult, but i haven't tried who knows what a doctor would say. For the time being I'm siding with the theory that the donors diet is very important to ensure a quantity of required bacteria to be restored with a FMT. My next attempt at an oral FMT will emphasize this variable. For the record I will remind everyone that my health improved about 15% form my first oral FMT but not the 2nd. Hopefully the end result of all this experiance, careful observations and reasoning will result in an effective protocol to share with others.

Miralax laxative would seem to be an easy option to add to the protocol though. Our bm's are separated by 24 hours time anyway so emptying the bowels may not be unnecessary as these bacteria would not be in the same vicinity with each other, the ingested dose of new bacteria would not come into contact the previous days meals. But i haven't thought about the idea of a laxative and whether or not that would be necessary or not. I think this would be more of a necessity if we were giving FMT enemas, because in this case the new bacteria would very likely come into contact with high numbers of the bad bacteria and cleaning out the colon with a lavage/enema before the FMT enema would make sense, but what I'm doing is an ORAL FMT so maybe this is a little different. I wanted to find an easier more convenient way to do FMT without doing 5-60 enemas, which is next to impossible to coordinate between two people that work and have families and busy schedules and such, doing an oral FMT one time is something we need to figure out especially when it comes to crohn's disease which seems the hardest to treat with FMT. I would have loved to find a way to make the pills but i had to give up on that.

Last edited by wildbill_52280; 01-02-2015 at 08:02 PM.
01-13-2015, 11:36 PM   #307
wildbill_52280
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This is what we have been waiting for. A company has the money to further develop a mixture of clostridia species of bacteria to replenish the loss of diversity in the intestinal microbiome to treat and possibly cure both forms of IBD. This could replace the existing methods of doing a Fecal Transplant. They have $241 million to do this. This is Awesome. Thanks again to our fellow member william4 for giving us the heads up on this news story. Now we will wait for human trials.


News Release-Tuesday, January 13, 2015
http://www.xconomy.com/boston/2015/0...he-microbiome/

Last edited by wildbill_52280; 01-14-2015 at 02:20 PM.
01-14-2015, 05:44 PM   #308
NothingL
 
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I was under the impression that it would take AT LEAST 10 years for microbiome based therapies to hit the market, but now I am certain that we will have microbiome based therapies IN 10 years or less.

We must also take into consideration that fecal transplants will probably become standard practice in order to prevent gastrointestinal problems. This shouldn't take longer than few years.

The Second Genome is also recruiting patients for their microbiome based drug to treat IBD.

January 12, 2015:

http://www.xconomy.com/san-francisco...biome-secrets/
01-14-2015, 11:09 PM   #309
wildbill_52280
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I was under the impression that it would take AT LEAST 10 years for microbiome based therapies to hit the market, but now I am certain that we will have microbiome based therapies IN 10 years or less.

We must also take into consideration that fecal transplants will probably become standard practice in order to prevent gastrointestinal problems. This shouldn't take longer than few years.

The Second Genome is also recruiting patients for their microbiome based drug to treat IBD.

January 12, 2015:

http://www.xconomy.com/san-francisco...biome-secrets/

One aspect moving things along is that these bacteria ALREADY exist in healthy people, which massively support their safety profile, so the bacterial preparation will move quickly to human trials. Well, this is one thing I read in an interview anyways. I'm generally aware that it takes quite a while to get to human trials but I'm no expert in this area.
01-21-2015, 11:34 AM   #310
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First, thank you wildbill 52280 for making the effort to collect all of this info on FMT.

As much of the research info is a while back, and intimated that by now there might be some results. Any info on what is the current status of some of this research for Crohn's and FMT, and/or why it never did conclude?

Also, for myself, I think a pill would be the best route to go as my terminal ilieum is the site where the Crohn's is and going the other direction (up rather than down) would be likely more problematic. Any info on where/how one gets one's hand on a pill if one is doing this without a doctor?

Again, many thanks.
01-21-2015, 02:18 PM   #311
wildbill_52280
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First, thank you wildbill 52280 for making the effort to collect all of this info on FMT.

As much of the research info is a while back, and intimated that by now there might be some results. Any info on what is the current status of some of this research for Crohn's and FMT, and/or why it never did conclude?

Also, for myself, I think a pill would be the best route to go as my terminal ilieum is the site where the Crohn's is and going the other direction (up rather than down) would be likely more problematic. Any info on where/how one gets one's hand on a pill if one is doing this without a doctor?

Again, many thanks.

Thanks for asking. Most of my posts in this thread cover the latest updates. In the initial first post of this thread I update section 2: History of fecal transplants with new information.

The conclusions of the studies so far are that fecal transplants are inducing remission in some patients with IBD without any need for drug therapy to maintain these remissions. In addition, there is good evidence to suggest some people are cured. But proving someone is cured with absolute certainty takes a while. To prove this logically, you would have to follow up multiple patients for their entire lives. So far we have been able to verify no sign of disease for up to 25 years with an ulcerative colitis patient and 12 years with a crohn's patient's whom had fecal transplants. So they have either achieved a very good remission or a cure, either one is fabulous in terms with what some patients have faced with this disease. So things are looking good for fecal transplants so far.

We have some knowledge about which bacteria are missing from the IBD patients which need to be restored, and we don't currently have the means to grow all of these species seperately to make a pill that contains only these species, so we are getting these bacteria from healthy donors stool sample. Doing it this way, its hard to predict what the actual dosage of bacteria the patient will recieve, and this is one factor that makes getting a fecal transplant a little unreliable although it seems to work from time to time. There is a way to put the whole range of fecal bacteria into a pill by filtering it and concentrating it with a centrifuge and one researcher has done this to treat c.difficle with success. I hope there will be more studies on IBD using this method of making a FMT pill. Otherwise there is a company that is developing a pill using 17 strains of clostridia which seem to be the most important bacteria that regulate inflammation and are missing ind IBD patients. http://www.xconomy.com/boston/2015/0...he-microbiome/

Until either of these things happen we wont have a FMT pill. You could try making one yourself I could share some ideas with you if you are interested in messaging me, other wise the simplest way to get the bacteria from a donors stool sample is to drink it, this is what I did 2x with some positive results and I'm doing it very soon again until I get it right.

Last edited by wildbill_52280; 01-21-2015 at 05:50 PM.
01-29-2015, 05:00 PM   #312
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Since this is a "FMT Guide" thread, I thought I would add something that might make the task easier and maybe result in a more effective treatment.

Some FMT practitioners suggest doing a cleanse before FMT. I guess the idea is to eliminate as much of the competition as possible, since you want the new set of bugs to "win". If the FMT is delivered via colonoscope, then your scope operator (aka doctor) will be able to tell you the exact process, and perhaps, write a prescription for the colonoscopy preparation supplies. This post is about if you don't want to go through the trouble of a doctor visit, just to get the prescription. The supplies below are all over the counter (in the US, at least). I would clear this with your doctor before hand, but that should just be an email.

If you google "university of michigan colonoscopy preparation" you should see a link to the Miralax/Gatorade Prep (http://www.med.umich.edu/1libr/MPU/U...orade_Prep.pdf). You must use the "G2" variety of Gatorade (no substitutions), but you can probably get away with the store-brand Miralax. The bottom line is the day before your FMT, first you take a couple of 5mg bisacodyl tablets, then wait for some "action". Then you mix 119g of PEG3350 (Miralax) with one bottle of G2, and chug it over a couple of hours (max). You can have clear liquids, after this, but only clear liquids. Given that your FMT is in the afternoon, the morning of your FMT, you mix another 119g into your other bottle of G2 and chug that over a couple of hours (max), making sure the last gulp (of G2 or anything) was at least couple of hours before your FMT. Being a little thirsty is good!
02-01-2015, 03:51 PM   #313
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Since this is a "FMT Guide" thread, I thought I would add something that might make for a more effective treatment.

Some FMT practitioners suggest using prebiotics to help feed the beneficial types of bacteria within the introduced microbiome. This is thought to help the new set of bugs "win" over the bugs that could be furthering the disease process. Although galactooligosaccharide prebiotic compounds are found in some foods, larger amounts may be found in commercial supplements. These supplements are made through bacterial action on dairy, so could be a problem for lactose interant people. Also, I'd say these supplements were purposefully "high-FODMAP" (the "O" stands for oligosaccharide), so someone requiring a Low FODMAP Diet would not be a candidate. Studies I have read used 2.5g or 5.0g per day. Not only can one feed the introduced microbiome by ingesting a prebiotic, I understand that some practitioners feed the infusion solution with a small amount (1g?) of prebiotic before infusion. Bimuno is made in the UK by Clasado, but they will ship to the US. Galactomune is sold in the US by Klaire Labs, but this product is not supposed to be direct to consumer (although it still seems to be available that way). Although both are galactooligosaccharides, they probably differ in their structure. I have researched Bimuno and discovered it was beta 1-3 structure with a good bit of low polymerization (DP2 and DP3). I have not yet found data on Galactomune, but I suspect it's the more common beta 1-4 structure.
02-04-2015, 05:43 AM   #314
mf15
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Since you are discussing poop pills,here is some info.
Another side of this is that opposed to rectal infusion, what if oral tolerance is a mechanism that also induces remission.
Anyhow drinking poo also might have some additional danger,such as aspiration into the lungs, where pills seem somewhat safer.

I have UC not crohns,anyhow as an aside, has anyone tried taking baking soda for crohns,since one of the problems with crohns is thick mucus in the crypts,not flushing bacteria from the crypts. One of the reasons that the mucus is overly thick is the lack of bicarbonate transport into the bottom of the crypts,which is needed to expand the mucus out of the crypts.
Old Mike
Overcapsulated with gel caps.


https://idsa.confex.com/idsa/2013/we...aper41627.html


http://thepowerofpoop.com/epatients/...lant-capsules/

Last edited by mf15; 02-04-2015 at 06:02 AM.
02-04-2015, 06:56 AM   #315
Spooky1
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Hi MF,
I take bicarb of soda, admittedly with a teaspoon of sugar, each day. Not so much for the Crohns but to perhaps stave off cancer after having a few cancer scares. I still take it and am not sure whether it helps crohns at all.

It was interesting to read both the links and also for the extra knowledge on bicarb and crohns.
thanks
02-04-2015, 01:41 PM   #316
wildbill_52280
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Since you are discussing poop pills,here is some info.
Another side of this is that opposed to rectal infusion, what if oral tolerance is a mechanism that also induces remission.
Anyhow drinking poo also might have some additional danger,such as aspiration into the lungs, where pills seem somewhat safer.

I have UC not crohns,anyhow as an aside, has anyone tried taking baking soda for crohns,since one of the problems with crohns is thick mucus in the crypts,not flushing bacteria from the crypts. One of the reasons that the mucus is overly thick is the lack of bicarbonate transport into the bottom of the crypts,which is needed to expand the mucus out of the crypts.
Old Mike
Overcapsulated with gel caps.


https://idsa.confex.com/idsa/2013/we...aper41627.html


http://thepowerofpoop.com/epatients/...lant-capsules/
thanks for the first link, I should really put that one in the initial post of this thread.
But unfortunately the power of poop website makes the claim of the small intestine supposedly being sterile, THIS is not true and they provided no references to support this claim anyways. although the ileum and large intestine contains the highest amount of bacteria, the small intestine still contains an astounding amount, and they are SUPPOSED to be there to maintain good health. Love to provide my own references for this claim,but i can only spend so much time upkeeping this thread as ive already dedicated so much, look it up!!

Last edited by wildbill_52280; 02-04-2015 at 02:19 PM.
02-04-2015, 01:55 PM   #317
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don't forget to follow the donor selection criteria before doing an FMT!! or this could happen!! its important, i suppose that's why i made the guide, its safe but ONLY if you follow the guidlines. its not clear though that the fecal transplant caused this but considering her donor was known to be overweight, something which the medical professionals should have advised against, this happened. so much for the DIY fecal transplant being dangerous, medical professionals arent even taking enough precautions. ive used 3 donors and have had no bad side effects so far, but that's because i'm only selecting people who are healthy.

http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2015/...1581423067944/
02-04-2015, 02:05 PM   #318
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On a more positive note, a doctor does a DIY Fecal Transplant for her U.C, says its helped alot and would do it again when she finds another donor.

http://diagnosey.blogspot.com/2015/0...ransplant.html

Last edited by wildbill_52280; 03-03-2015 at 02:43 PM.
02-04-2015, 02:12 PM   #319
mf15
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WB As far as I know the small intestine is not sterile, has some bacteria of course not the amounts in the colon.
With crohns,dysbiotic bacteria at early onset, with higher than normal counts.
As I said above part of the problem is not flushing the bacteria from the crypts with
thin expanded mucus,which is what should happen.
How FT might fix this, I have no idea,perhaps getting rid of dysbiotic bacteria fixes other
functional problems,don't know,or is it oral tolerance induction.
Been studying IBD now for about 35 years, still cant fix my UC, but at some point might go all in with FT. Eventually it is going to kill me one way or the other FT might be a solution for some.

Yea that doc is on the healing well UC forum I normally hang out at, but we have also had people who did Rectal FT and got very sick,with what was believed to be quality donors.
Old Mike
02-04-2015, 02:32 PM   #320
Spooky1
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Wildbill, we do appreciate the efforts and information. It means a lot to some of us. I wish I knew a healthy person and I'd do home trial. Bit peculiar about getting fat from fat donor or skinny too. Was just reading in the paper how a man received a transplant from someone killed on his bike, he now can't resist cycling. I suppose even a gut flora transplant is a link to the previous person. Bit scarey thinking about it. Have you any new hobbies that you didn't have prior to FMT?
02-04-2015, 04:23 PM   #321
7vNH
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... Have you any new hobbies that you didn't have prior to FMT?
Lol! I totally get the fat/skinny thing is real. I'd rather be fat than sick, though.

My theory is that each of us has a set of microbes that have found a specific "détente" between microbial "armys". So when there's wheat around, you guys from army "A" bloom, and when there's fiber, you other guys from army "B" bloom, but nobody ever gets a total defeat. Obviously it's much more dynamic than two armys, but you get the idea.

So each of us has our own set of "armys", developed over our life times, and it's settled out into this "détente" arrangement. It's a stand-off that is probably very stable. The reason I say that is when people have PCR (genetic fingerprint of the microbiome) done multiple times over a long span of time, it doesn't change much (if left undisturbed by antibiotics or something). So while I certainly agree that there probably sets of microbial armys that are stable and that cause a person to consume more calories (by playing with hunger) or extract more calories from food, I have a hard time believing that someone who gets a new set of "bugs" would have any kind of personality shift.
02-04-2015, 04:48 PM   #322
7vNH
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Previously I presented two ways that could be used to enhance the effectiveness of FMT...introducing a new microbiome (cleaning out the old with a DIY "prep", and also providing the right kind of food to feed the new microbiome). As a third topic to enhance the "FMT Guide" aspect of this thread is the possibility of doing even MORE to clean-out the old before brining in the new: Colonic Lavage, aka Colon Hydro Therapy.

If you've never heard of this, it's basically a system where warm water is introduced to the colon, then allowed to drain out. It's repeated many times and the large intestine is typically massaged to release as much matter as possible. Both the introduction and removal of water is done through one, single-use plastic device placed in the rectum, so it's not typically very messy or smelly.

In Charlotte, there were many practitioners that are certified by the international association of colonhydrotherapy to choose from. If you are currently in any kind of flare, you probably shouldn't do this, and I doubt that when you report the specifics of your condition to the therapist (which you must), they would advise to continue anyway.

Of course we don't have any studies that prove that a new microbiome's chances of "sticking" are improved by colonic lavage (or doing a "prep", or feeding the new bugs, for that matter), but on the face of it, all three seem like, if precautions are followed, they couldn't hurt and probably would help to increase the chances of a successful replacement of a microbiome.
02-04-2015, 06:02 PM   #323
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thanks for that, 7b, course wildbill hasn't responded yet as he's now fixated on knitting or something
02-06-2015, 12:05 PM   #324
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... I promise you i will find a way to do this and I'm much closer then ever before.
I just searched this thread for "enteric" and didn't get any hits. I'm not sure I've been watching this thread super closely, so sorry if you've already covered this but...

Have you thought much about filling enteric coated capsules, with the idea being, get past the hydrochloric acid of the stomach? The way I figure it (just an engineer, not even a chem-e, and certainly not a doctor), you take a bunch of bugs and run them through some acid, you're going to "select for" acid resistant bugs. That might leave the good ones, it might leave the bad ones, it might leave a mix. But the result will probably not be the same mix that you started with, since the ones that couldn't take the acid would be goners. I kind of presume that you want a mix that was like the ones you started with, since those are the guys that like the environment of the large intestine.

Again, wild speculation here, but on the premise that the stomach acid is protecting the rest of your GI tract, getting bugs that "should have" been neutralized into the small intestine, could that be "bad"? I have heard the term "bacterial overgrowth" in regard to the small intestine, but really don't know much about that at all. Just a thought on a possible risk associated with enteric coating.

I wonder if you could get-by with smaller amounts of bugs in the first place by taking an enteric approach, since many fewer would be killed-off by the stomach acid. Did I read somewhere that someone was coating the insides of gelatin capsules with raw coconut oil (solid at room temperature) to protect the gelatin from dissolving before it could be consumed? Because I see that as one of the problems with this; gelatin would begin to dissolve immediately upon getting filled, and could become a mess. That's probably less of an issue with you, since you, as I understand it, performed an almost super human feat: consumed the slurry unadorned. But I understand that if the do-nothing consequences of disease are bad enough, one will put-up with risks and inconveniences, even if the chance of payoff is not assured.
02-06-2015, 04:28 PM   #325
wildbill_52280
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I just searched this thread for "enteric" and didn't get any hits. I'm not sure I've been watching this thread super closely, so sorry if you've already covered this but...

Have you thought much about filling enteric coated capsules, with the idea being, get past the hydrochloric acid of the stomach? The way I figure it (just an engineer, not even a chem-e, and certainly not a doctor), you take a bunch of bugs and run them through some acid, you're going to "select for" acid resistant bugs. That might leave the good ones, it might leave the bad ones, it might leave a mix. But the result will probably not be the same mix that you started with, since the ones that couldn't take the acid would be goners. I kind of presume that you want a mix that was like the ones you started with, since those are the guys that like the environment of the large intestine.

Again, wild speculation here, but on the premise that the stomach acid is protecting the rest of your GI tract, getting bugs that "should have" been neutralized into the small intestine, could that be "bad"? I have heard the term "bacterial overgrowth" in regard to the small intestine, but really don't know much about that at all. Just a thought on a possible risk associated with enteric coating.

I wonder if you could get-by with smaller amounts of bugs in the first place by taking an enteric approach, since many fewer would be killed-off by the stomach acid. Did I read somewhere that someone was coating the insides of gelatin capsules with raw coconut oil (solid at room temperature) to protect the gelatin from dissolving before it could be consumed? Because I see that as one of the problems with this; gelatin would begin to dissolve immediately upon getting filled, and could become a mess. That's probably less of an issue with you, since you, as I understand it, performed an almost super human feat: consumed the slurry unadorned. But I understand that if the do-nothing consequences of disease are bad enough, one will put-up with risks and inconveniences, even if the chance of payoff is not assured.
They were coating the inside of a gelatin capsule with beeswax, which I'm not sure is a good idea because beeswax may have some antibacterial properties. I highly doubt there is any scientific data on how human GI microbiota would interact with beeswax. But you could simply try it and find out if it works for you. But its better to have some scientific basis behind it. The reason for coating the capsule with beeswax was so that the gelatin capsule would not break down so quickly, the beeswax wasn't intended on protecting the bacteria from the stomach acid.

Nature has been inoculating our intestines with the required bacteria for a long time despite stomach acid, it's likely this is a non issue for FMT's. Dr louie at university of calgary canada has used regular gelatin caps to give people fecal transplants with c difficile infection with good results so far, so for those reasons, it doesn't seem like a big issue as to whether the good bacteria can survive an oral route trough the stomach acid and into the lower gi tract. In all likelihood, the good bacteria will survive the journey, if they are there in the first place, if they are alive in the first place, if they are high enough in quantity in the first place.
02-06-2015, 07:37 PM   #326
mf15
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I guess I have a question I am not sure about.
People get sick with a coliform infection from swimming pools, and sewage leaks into the ocean. They are always checking coliform levels.
So if you eat pure poo, many/none perhaps do not get sick, so what is going on.
We also know that some with UC and with rectal FT do get worse
Old Mike
02-07-2015, 10:57 AM   #327
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OM, My interpretation of why ingesting a large-intestine microbiome doesn't usually cause symptoms is because there are not high quantities of pathogenic bacteria in the FMT. Since healthy donors are selected, although they have billions of E.coli, those donors don't have high counts of E.coli pathotypes (the ones that cause disease). The most commonly identified "bad E.coli" in North America is E. coli O157:H7.
02-16-2015, 01:16 AM   #328
wildbill_52280
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Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2015 Mar;21
(3):556-63. doi: 10.1097/MIB.0000000000000307.

Fecal microbial transplant effect on clinical outcomes and fecal microbiome in active Crohn's disease.
Abstract

BACKGROUND:
Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic idiopathic inflammatory intestinal disorder associated with fecal dysbiosis. Fecal microbial transplant (FMT) is a potential therapeutic option for individuals with CD based on the hypothesis that changing the fecal dysbiosis could promote less intestinal inflammation.

METHODS:
Nine patients, aged 12 to 19 years, with mild-to-moderate symptoms defined by Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index (PCDAI of 10-29) were enrolled into a prospective open-label study of FMT in CD (FDA IND 14942). Patients received FMT by nasogastric tube with follow-up evaluations at 2, 6, and 12 weeks. PCDAI, C-reactive protein, and fecal calprotectin were evaluated at each study visit.

RESULTS:
All reported adverse events were graded as mild except for 1 individual who reported moderate abdominal pain after FMT. All adverse events were self-limiting. Metagenomic evaluation of stool microbiome indicated evidence of FMT engraftment in 7 of 9 patients. The mean PCDAI score improved with patients having a baseline of 19.7 ± 7.2, with improvement at 2 weeks to 6.4 ± 6.6 and at 6 weeks to 8.6 ± 4.9. Based on PCDAI, 7 of 9 patients were in remission at 2 weeks and 5 of 9 patients who did not receive additional medical therapy were in remission at 6 and 12 weeks. No or modest improvement was seen in patients who did not engraft or whose microbiome was most similar to their donor.

CONCLUSIONS:
This is the first study to demonstrate that FMT for CD may be a possible therapeutic option for CD. Further prospective studies are required to fully assess the safety and efficacy of the FMT in patients with CD.
02-16-2015, 06:50 AM   #329
mf15
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No or modest improvement was seen in patients who did not engraft or whose microbiome was most similar to their donor.

What is going on with a similar microbiome to the donor, I wonder.

Old Mike
02-16-2015, 07:38 AM   #330
rollinstone
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No or modest improvement was seen in patients who did not engraft or whose microbiome was most similar to their donor.

What is going on with a similar microbiome to the donor, I wonder.

Old Mike
Perhaps the donors that have a similar microbiome do not have the host genetic defect, either way exciting that the ones where the donors microbiome did engraft reached remission.
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