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03-17-2013, 02:25 PM   #31
juljul
 
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Thanks juljul. Really appreciate your response. You sound knowledgeable so wondering what you would suggest to eat after 8 weeks out from first time ileocolic resection. Not getting results from GI or surgeon.Each says to ask the other why I'm having diarrhea. I have very low good cholesterol so can't take Questran or looks like no Pysilluim husk since they will lower it more and that can lead .Thanks in advance. Surgeon did say eat fiber but don't know if that's a good idea under the circumstances.
Hi itsme2,
Have they ran any cultures to see if there is a bacterial element. If you suspect a bacterial element (odour, gases) you could try goldenseal. I solved the 'remnants' of a recent UTI with this after standard antibiotic use. I must add that I always use pharmaceutical antibiotics first if I am ofered them, but they don't always work with me. Oregano oil used to help with the constant UTIs and what I suspect was SIBO but I think my body has got used to it, and it proved to be a double edged sword for me (because of my connective tissue disease). And of course take a good probiotic. Goldenseal should not be taken in pregnancy or nursing, and should not be taken by anyone with a known sensitivity to berberine. As with any drug/supplement - keep an look out for any reactions. Oregano oil is really good stuff but my body got used to it because I had to take so much at one point just to get off the sofa because I could not sit from my "backside" pain. I am not going to recommend it because what happened with me was that I kept on having to increase it step-wise. I was on so much at one point and I found it really worsened my arthritis towards the end. I don't take it now - unless I am desperate with my "backside" pain/gases. I don't think everyone reacts that way with regards to oregano oil and arthritis. I have untreated (as of yet) UCTD/Lupus (just diagnosed) wich might explain it with me.

If it is not about bacteria, your body might benefit from astringent herbs. You could try nettle tea, blackbery leaf tea, or red raspberry leaf tea (you can make either from capsules if you can't find the pure tea) or you could alternatively just take a capsule. Again, don't take red raspberry leaf if pregnant (though it is sometimes used in later pregnancy to stimulate labour). I would try to add some organic carob powder to your diet if you can get hold of some also, to help with diarrhea and provide some valuable nourishment added to drinks or foods that may require some natural sweetness... Carob has a fair amount of fibre, the type of fibre that should not make your dirrhea worse. Slippery elm is another one that might help diarrhea (or constipation apparently) and it has soothing properties for the GI tract. Marshmallow is another herb that can be taken thas has soothing properties for the GI tract. As is DGL licorice (on an empty stomach). edit: Aniseed is also good for you at this time (for diarrhea) and can aid digestion.

Steamed white fish (drizzled with extra virgin olive oil) and veggies and fruit that you feel you can tolerate should be good for you at tihis time. Rice, carrots, bananas....these are all supposed to help, as is apple sauce or just raw apples (apples are rich in 'binding' pectin). I would stay away from hot spices completely. Bland is better at this time. Fresh wild salmon will provide you with much needed omega 3 to boost your HDL cholesterol. You could alternatively add some ground flax seeds to your diet for omega 3 ....but if you are going to use flax seed powder introduce it slowly because it is fibre rich and can cause diarrhea in some. Any sign of diarrhea with it then just stop using it. It also has to be stored in te fridge once opened because it goes rancid quickly. You could alternatively try a krill oil capsule. Virgin coconut oil is also supposed to boost HDL cholesterol and is good for the GI system, and other systems (e.g. the brain)..

Always consult with your doctors though and keep them posted with regards to what you are eating and planning on taking - supplement-wise. Some herbs interact with some drugs.

Best wishes.
03-17-2013, 04:55 PM   #32
itsme2
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Tarrytown, New York
xxx

Last edited by itsme2; 05-05-2013 at 02:11 PM.
03-18-2013, 05:42 AM   #33
juljul
 
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Sorry itsme2, I hadn't realised you were a guy ...oops
Have your pancreatic enzymes been tested, bile production, etc ....if you have difficulty with some fats (e.g. coconut oil) ...
Though of course not all foods agree with everyone.

Can't they give you one of those meal substitutes they have for Crohn's patients that give your gut a rest....you could have that maybe twice a day and try food the rest of the time. Or are you on those already.

Thank you for your good wishes. I wish you well too itsme2.
Take care...
03-18-2013, 01:39 PM   #34
Moeed
 
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Hi Guys, I am completely overwhelmed by the number of responses this post has received and I would like to thank you all.

I really appreciate you all taking the time to pass on your advice and experiences to others and I have have read all of the posts and taken everything into account.

I feel that this diet is necessary for myself as I want to eliminate the foods that are not good for me. Red meat is on that list as it is much harder to digest than white meat but through experience I have realised it just doesn't agree with me.

I am completely in love with all forms of cakes, breads, pastries etc but I have come to realise that is the reason why I am probably constantly bloated.

I feel I just need to cut most things out and re-introduce them slowly to see what does and doesn't work for me.

Thank you all again so much for your advice.

Much love

Moeed X
02-20-2014, 04:47 PM   #35
durwardian
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Another thing i notice when i take a break form running i have more problems i can't explain why so just wondering if over all health, diet,getting active is the cure.I have had no surgeries, when i diagnosed with crohn's i could have lost a few pounds and watched my diet i didn't think i was in that bad of shape,but i was eating junk food drinking pop didn't exercise. My friends wife was on bed rest during her prenancy she has colitis went from being fine to getting her colon takin out in 3 weeks she did not have any problems for about 2 years.Not being able to go for a walk or something and the taxing on her body from the prenancy?So after being diagnosed i know it sounds silly but people start to watch what they eat and try to get healthy thats why i think its the food that started our problems in the beginning.
I was also fine when I ran every day. I think the exercise and sweating out the poisons has a lot to do with good health. Toxin levels build up, then one piece of cake and it breaks the camel's back. Perhaps way too many of us don't realize how bad we feel because it does build up so gradually. Then we think it was the piece of cake, but the cake was just the last straw to overload the system. So if the system is cleaned out, the cake becomes fine. As long as we stay healthy in general, I think we tolerate things a lot easier. However, that being said, my grandmother always said, "everything in moderation", and she made it healthy to 100 years old, having a cigar every so often, and drinking her red wine.

My point being, we shouldn't blame one food group or the other, or sugar, or any one particular item, it is probably a combination of all the things we are doing to ourselves, lack of exercise, and the illlness.

Not doing wheat can help if that's an irritant, sure. But always try to go about it scientifically. If you cut out what you think is wheat, but still sneak those snacks in that are full of sweeteners and preservatives, you will never know if it was this, or that. There is a right way to go about eliminating things from your diet. It starts with talking to your doctor about your wishes, get some professional opinions, talk with friends, family, see the forum here.

Then you get to choose how you want to do that. If you select one food item per day and eat nothing else, or if you go on a diet with the food list and cookbook. Up to you how you want to do it.

I went to the allergy/immunology doctor and got tested for known food groups and drugs. I was surprised that I don't have a food problem, I have a preservative problem. It is a natural preservative, so it is high in apples and a few other things. Avoiding that is all I have to do to maintain pretty good bowels. So, my advice would be, before you go all vegetarian, or stop enjoying the foods you love, take a smart look at your options.
02-20-2014, 06:53 PM   #36
kel
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I was also fine when I ran every day. I think the exercise and sweating out the poisons has a lot to do with good health. Toxin levels build up, then one piece of cake and it breaks the camel's back. Perhaps way too many of us don't realize how bad we feel because it does build up so gradually. Then we think it was the piece of cake, but the cake was just the last straw to overload the system. So if the system is cleaned out, the cake becomes fine. As long as we stay healthy in general, I think we tolerate things a lot easier. However, that being said, my grandmother always said, "everything in moderation", and she made it healthy to 100 years old, having a cigar every so often, and drinking her red wine.

My point being, we shouldn't blame one food group or the other, or sugar, or any one particular item, it is probably a combination of all the things we are doing to ourselves, lack of exercise, and the illlness.

Not doing wheat can help if that's an irritant, sure. But always try to go about it scientifically. If you cut out what you think is wheat, but still sneak those snacks in that are full of sweeteners and preservatives, you will never know if it was this, or that. There is a right way to go about eliminating things from your diet. It starts with talking to your doctor about your wishes, get some professional opinions, talk with friends, family, see the forum here.

Then you get to choose how you want to do that. If you select one food item per day and eat nothing else, or if you go on a diet with the food list and cookbook. Up to you how you want to do it.

I went to the allergy/immunology doctor and got tested for known food groups and drugs. I was surprised that I don't have a food problem, I have a preservative problem. It is a natural preservative, so it is high in apples and a few other things. Avoiding that is all I have to do to maintain pretty good bowels. So, my advice would be, before you go all vegetarian, or stop enjoying the foods you love, take a smart look at your options.
Were you taking immunosuppresants when you were tested?
02-20-2014, 07:02 PM   #37
durwardian
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No, my immune system is broken. So yes to it being down too low.
I get immune boosters to help, not suppressants.
02-20-2014, 07:53 PM   #38
daves
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: devonport, Tasmania, Australia
I love my smoothies,its all a mater of trying everyone is slightly different cant eat tomatoes but can have tomato sauce.can get away with an egg for a day but eat one every day will upset the system.Definatly cant go near pastries even though would love some everday.Green smoothies with banana and spinach etc with all the fibre seems to help me heaps but may not agree with some.Its all trial and error
02-07-2015, 09:58 AM   #39
Suave
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
I am the mother of an 18 year old son. He got suddenly very sick last March. He was diagnosed with Crohn's. It is a long story but he has been only eating home made food (eats out only on Sundays- once). It is important to have a doctor do a full allergy test as many foods cause damage to the stomach. So, even if you are trying to eat healthy, if you are eating something that you are sensitive to or allergic to, your inflammation won't go down. Allergy causes havoc even in the most healthy people. I might start a thread soon with more information. But, please have an allergy test. Also, do the introducing food slowly as some things like gluten and milk sensitivity are not really tested for. My son is allergic to grass so many green things make him sick. He is allergic to apples and bananas so eating healthy for him means not eating many fruits. He is allergic to Sesame seeds and has gotten a few relapses because he ate or took vitamins that had sesame seed oil in it. So, yes, it is very complicated. Don't give up on eating healthy; it might be working for you but maybe you are consuming one item that you are allergic too. No regular milk for him; only Coconut milk with no sugar. By the way, sugar and regular oils are inflammatory so he avoids any fry foods and sweeten foods. He uses pinapple juice for all his smothies.
02-07-2015, 04:39 PM   #40
Marlena
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If you have a health food store near you - run to it! I was at mine today, which is quite small, but it has an almost overwhelming array of alternative foods - breads, crackers, ice cream, cheese, snacks, soups, cereals. Some groceries are now better about it. Whole Foods, Trader Joe's, Wegmans all carry a good supply. Best of luck! M
02-07-2015, 04:42 PM   #41
Marlena
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OOps

Last edited by Marlena; 02-07-2015 at 04:44 PM. Reason: late response, I screwed up
02-08-2015, 02:36 AM   #42
daves
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: devonport, Tasmania, Australia
just started doing paleo and seems to be working extremely well would love to know if anyone else has tried this,from my experience would highly suggest people give it a go.
02-08-2015, 07:05 AM   #43
UnXmas
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It is important to have a doctor do a full allergy test as many foods cause damage to the stomach. So, even if you are trying to eat healthy, if you are eating something that you are sensitive to or allergic to, your inflammation won't go down. Allergy causes havoc even in the most healthy people. I might start a thread soon with more information. But, please have an allergy test. Also, do the introducing food slowly as some things like gluten and milk sensitivity are not really tested for.
Why do you say that gluten and milk sensitivity are not really tested for? I'm not sure quite how you'd define "sensitivity", but lactose intolerance and coeliac seem to be the main food-related medical conditions doctors test for besides "true" food allergies. It may be that your son's doctors feel his Crohn's diagnosis accounts for all his digestive problems and so believe testing for lactose intolerance and coeliac are unnecessary, but it's worth asking them about it if you're concerned and you haven't already discussed it with them. If your son has had endoscopies to diagnose and monitor his Crohn's, coeliac disease may have been ruled out then, though I'm not sure if endoscopies can miss it sometimes. If your son notices he has symptoms from eating dairy (i.e. from lactose), I would have thought a doctor would arrange a lactose intolerance test, especially if he is having symptoms that seem too severe for the current state of his Crohn's disease to account for. It's worth asking.

Last edited by UnXmas; 02-08-2015 at 09:45 AM.
02-08-2015, 09:55 AM   #44
Suave
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
I could be wrong but when we saw an allergist, she said that it could not be tested. She did testing for many other things which were very helpful. He is allergic to almond, sesame seeds, grass, apples, dogs, cats, and many other things. Soy is one of his many allergies and it is very annoying because soy is found almost on everything out there. He does avoid milk products but that is not a big issue for him. knowing what the allergies are, is very important as he is allergic to almond and at the beginning of this journey I bought almond milk because the coconut milk had finished. It is a long journey and has no end. However, he is not in pain and that is such a relief.
02-08-2015, 11:36 AM   #45
UnXmas
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I could be wrong but when we saw an allergist, she said that it could not be tested.
She said that there is no test for coeliac (autoimmune reaction to gluten, which is found in wheat and certain other grains) or lactose intolerance (inability to properly digest lactose, found in dairy products) can't be tested for? Either she's wrong or she failed to explain it to you clearly. Possibly she meant that they are not alllergies, which is true; they're not the same as allergic reactions to foods. But they do involve symptoms resulting from eating certain foods, so should be considered if you notice symptoms which seem to correlate with eating them. There are a few different ways of testing for these conditions.

But if your son is having regular tests to monitor his Crohn's, my guess is that coeliac would probably be detected anyway, and if he's not having major issues with dairy, or is happy to avoid dairy anyway, there's probably no need to push for testing to be done. Did these diagnoses ever come up when your son was in the process of being diagnosed with Crohn's? Because the symptoms can be similar, often both coeliac and lactose intolerance are considered in people who go on to be diagnosed with Crohn's.

I would add that I have encountered quite a few alternative medicine practitioners who went by various professional titles - allergists, nutritionists, etc. - who did various tests for allergies and intolerances which were complete nonsense; there is a lot of quackery in this area of healthcare. If your son's allergist is helping him, of course keep seeing her and following her recommendations, but you may want to ask her for clarification about the types of reaction she's testing for and how the tests work, as it's important to know exactly what type of allergy, sensitivity, or whatever your son has. There are big differences between true allergies, the type of reaction that occurs with lactose intolerance, the reaction in coeliac, and the various things that "sensitivity", "intolerance", etc. are used to describe. They can have serious implications, as I'm sure you know, hence why when you're admitted to hospital one of the first things you're asked is what you're allergic to!

I hope your son continues to remain pain-free.

Last edited by UnXmas; 02-08-2015 at 12:32 PM.
02-08-2015, 11:55 PM   #46
daves
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: devonport, Tasmania, Australia
I would definitely look into paleo diet it eliminates a lot of foods which can cause reactions, and also introduces lots of food which have anti inflammatory properties.Doctors will tell you it doesn't have much to do with diet if its crohns causing him his worst pains but I have trigger foods which cause me lots of trouble ,lettuce ,tomato ,milk are some of the worst.Cereals don't seem to help me at all as well ,have swapped to eggs and bacon for breakfast and haven't looked back.Doctors will tell you about all the drugs you can try to help your son but you need to look into all the anti inflammatory foods that will help without the side effects ,olives ,bannanas ,macadamia nuts ,lots of different options. I also avoid chocolate which can go either way.
02-10-2015, 10:41 AM   #47
Suave
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
It is a mission but sometimes I do feel like there is no hope. My son is doing well enough but one wrong food and he gets some of the symptoms. I do know that the right foods will help at least make life less miserable. Even if you are taking medicine, it is good to find out which foods are bad for your body. Our problem is different that most people here, because he has strong constipation and meats are constipating however, I don't think they give him inflammation. Inflammation is the main thing to bring down. My daughter suffers from allergies and Asthma. Asthma is when the lungs get inflamed and oxygen doesn't go in to help breathe. Well, in crohn's, the inflammation takes over those inside parts as well. I just don't know how it can be cured because obviously, those allergies get in the way. My son also has pollen allergies and when those trees are blooming, he suffers too. He is also allergic to dogs and cats. All allergies affect the body with inflammation.
02-11-2015, 04:42 AM   #48
daves
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: devonport, Tasmania, Australia
Does he take a antihistamine for his allergies this should bring allergies caused by enviromental things under control. Wheat can cause excess running noses etc, by removing a lot of these foods that can cause excessive reactions from the body and replacing with anti inflammatory foods can have positive effects,although this doesn't happen overnight. Banana's have a positive effect by feeding good gut bacteria and contains good fibre.Apples without the skin works well also.Using all the good oils also feeds the good bacteria coconut,olive oil,duck fat,dripping.
02-11-2015, 06:23 AM   #49
UnXmas
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It is a mission but sometimes I do feel like there is no hope. My son is doing well enough but one wrong food and he gets some of the symptoms. I do know that the right foods will help at least make life less miserable. Even if you are taking medicine, it is good to find out which foods are bad for your body. Our problem is different that most people here, because he has strong constipation and meats are constipating however, I don't think they give him inflammation. Inflammation is the main thing to bring down. My daughter suffers from allergies and Asthma. Asthma is when the lungs get inflamed and oxygen doesn't go in to help breathe. Well, in crohn's, the inflammation takes over those inside parts as well. I just don't know how it can be cured because obviously, those allergies get in the way. My son also has pollen allergies and when those trees are blooming, he suffers too. He is also allergic to dogs and cats. All allergies affect the body with inflammation.
I was going to ask the same question as daves: what treatment is he getting for his allergies?

And what treatments has he tried for constipation? There are a lot of laxatives, stool softeners, fibre supplements/bulking agents, even suppositories, rectal catheters and enemas out there. You do have to be extra careful with Crohn's. Always start with low doses and work up, though since he does have Crohn's, I would ask a doctor about what he should try.

A lot can be done with diet to help constipation in some cases also. What fruits and vegetables does he eat? What grains, nuts or seeds? Has his allergist made suggestions about what foods he can have as substitutions for the ones he can't? I think I'm right in saying that rice is usually a "safe" food for people with sensitivities - maybe whole grain rice would help if he needs fibre? Most fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, beans, etc. provide fibre also (bananas being one of the few exceptions that is actually constipating!). I've had to do the opposite, and avoid fibre at all costs much of the time, but that's resulted in my knowing every high-fibre food out there if you want suggestions. Though keep in mind that not every kind of constipation can be helped by adding fibre.

Has he had the cause of the constipation diagnosed? Been checked for any impacted stool in the bowel or had bowel transit studies done?

Sorry to throw so many questions at you! But constipation is often a very treatable problem. The difficult part is that there are many different types of constipation, and many different causes. If you can find a good doctor to identify what kind of constipation your son has, you can then go about finding ways to remedy it, even with his dietary restrictions.

I'm not sure whether it's Crohn's or asthma/allergies that you say you're not sure can be cured: unfortunately, Crohn's can't be cured, though it can go into remission. I don't know much about allergies or asthma, but I don't think they can be cured either. The best way to tackle the inflammation in Crohn's is with medication. Again, there are many options out there. What medications has he tried? Has he been seen by doctors recently to assess whether he may need a medication change? Sometimes surgery can also help. While none of these treatments are ideal, some are last resorts, and sometimes Crohn's persists without remission despite treatment, almost always there is something more that can be done to help a bit; there is always hope.

Your son is obviously dedicated to diet and is doing everything he can to help himself - not everyone can do that, and not everyone has a dedicated family member, as your son has with you helping him. In this respect he stands a good chance of success.

One thing I would suggest if you haven't got it in place already: doctors from different specialities who communicate with each other. A lot of doctors do not seem to communicate well! If you can get his allergist to talk with his GI (or whoever manages his Crohn's), it may be beneficial. Maybe you could find a dietician who specialises in IBD, or who knows about food allergies, and can help him manage the constipation through diet despite his food restrictions?

I wouldn't have thought that his allergies to pollen, dogs and cats would affect his Crohn's disease, if that's something you're concerned about, but that's something you could check with his GI.

Last edited by UnXmas; 02-11-2015 at 07:01 AM.
02-11-2015, 06:47 AM   #50
UnXmas
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Also check out the forum support group for people with Crohn's and constipation: http://www.crohnsforum.com/showthrea...t=constipation

There aren't that many members, but if you post specific questions there, someone may be able to help you out.
02-11-2015, 01:24 PM   #51
Suave
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Thank you UnXmas for your reply. My son is not seeing any specialist right now. I would say that from 0% he is now at 60 to 70% healthier. Constipation runs in the family. My mother has dealt with constipation all her life. She is excellent with her diet and has done many studies of her constipation. I believe constipation is a life long battle. My son is going pretty much every day to the bathroom. But, since he has a fistula, we work harder at keeping the stools as soft as possible. The fistula seems to be closing. He is not in pain and he has a lot more energy. He also has a big appetite and that is tough trying not to eat a lot. I just have my bad days, because I get discouraged when he has an allergic reaction or is having a constipated day. I work very hard making smoothies for him, buying products, cooking at home etc so I expect more. He is in good spirits lately. We have an anti-inflammation diet but it is too long to mention here. I will soon write a thread about it. It has been great but it took a little white to kick in as all is natural. Things he drinks daily in his smoothies are ginger, kale, broccoli, carrots, celery, radishes, chia seeds, oatmeal, and at night Fiberimmune. There are many pills he takes too. We are trying to heal him from the inside out and there is progress, lots of progress. Tomorrow he goes for a follow up blood test. Thanks again for your input.
02-12-2015, 09:34 AM   #52
UnXmas
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Is your son overweight? If not, he shouldn't be restricting his eating. At 18 he's probably still growing and needs a lot of food!

What causes the constipation in your family? Constipation is not a medical condition, it's a symptom, which means there is a medical condition causing it. If either your mother or your son has not had the cause of their constipation diagnosed, it would be safer to consider your son's may not be due to a genetic condition; especially with Crohn's, it's better to get a confirmed cause diagnosed, if possible, or at least rule out potentially serious causes. Was it investigated when he was in the process of being diagnosed with Crohn's? And genetic or otherwise, there are many treatments for constipation that he (and your mother!) could try.

What pills is he taking? Am I right in thinking these are not prescribed medications, but that they're "natural" rather than conventional medication? Who is doing the blood tests? Are the blood tests to monitor his Crohn's (basic blood tests to check for signs of inflammation, deficiencies, etc.)?

I'm sorry to put this so bluntly, but by keeping to only natural treatments, your son is denying himself some of the best chances for managing his Crohn's. It might be a good idea to keep an open mind about the possibility that conventional medication will be needed to deal with some aspects of Crohn's, especially if he has some symptoms which are persisting despite all his and your efforts. It may also be a good idea to have some more tests done to assess the current status of his Crohn's. It's possible for Crohn's to do damage "silently" - i.e. for damage to be being done internally without causing symptoms, or despite symptoms improving. In addition to checking for internal damage, tests may also help you and your son to understand what's causing the symptoms that are persisting, and decide whether you want to continue trying with diet and natural treatments alone, or whether conventional treatment could be needed.

You can also discuss the problems and test results with a gastroenterologist (might be called a GI depending what country you're in?) - your son would be under no obligation to proceed with treatment, he could just see what a specialist (or two) advises and make up his own mind. Did your son see a specialist when he was diagnosed? Was there a reason he stopped seeing that doctor?
02-13-2015, 03:12 PM   #53
Suave
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Thanks Unxmas and Daves. I just typed a bunch of things and I lost it all. Now, I will try and reply again but not as happy like the first time. First, I appreciate all your comments. I will double read it again as I learn a lot from the different advice or ideas in this forum and also on the IBS forum. Many people with IBS suffer from constipation. Many of them on the forums, have sought all kind of help for their constipation to no avail. Constipation is hard to treat because the body re-adjust and what works today doesn't work tomorrow. My son has doctors prescribed powders but they don't work all the time. We are just adding fiber all day to his foods. We use chia seeds, hemp protein, raw broccoli, fiber immune from the larch trees etc. Then we cook many foods that have fiber like carrots, broccoli, oatmeal (glutten free) and more. We cook without oil and add olive oil or coconut oil once his food is served. He eats lots of greens even if they don't have fiber because it is healthy. He eats chicken, fish or turkey on a daily basis. These are constipating foods but he needs it for health. We boil or grill on the George Foreman grill. We add many anti-inflammatory foods to his diet like ginger, cumin, curcumin, garlic, oregano, turmeric, onions. He takes many vitamins; vitamin D3, oregano oil, garlic pills, Evening Primrose oil, turmeric, Probiotics and daily enzymes with his meals. All in all, it is a whole anti-inflammatory program. When he got diagnosed, he had throat problems, acid reflux (ulcers), back pains, knee pains, and awful fistula pain. He didn't want to eat afraid to go to the bathroom. At present, his throat is not hurting, his back and knee doesn't hurt and his fistula doesn't hurt either. He just had blood work and we will see if his infection; inflammation went down. He also now have more energy. He goes to college and works. This March will be a year since his alwful, painful Crohn's episode. I know Crohn's is hard to deal with even when taking doctor prescribed medication. Many here take medication and then the body stops responding to it. Then they have to switch. I am aware that my son needs to see a doctor and he sees his regular doctor now. I definitely want him to have a full check up on the inside. He doesn't want to right now but I will hope to convince him soon. Thanks again for caring.
02-13-2015, 04:41 PM   #54
Marlena
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Suave, you all have a tough walk, sending care and hugs and support to you. M
02-13-2015, 04:44 PM   #55
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Hi there. I am in the UK too. Do you know about the Lofflex diet, by Professor John Hunter? Well respected. Would give you a good starting point. Google it and there is download of the diet or use this link: http://nutricia.co.uk/e028/uploads/L...Diary_Full.pdf
I struggle to tolerate many things, but find Sainsbury's Freefrom bread ok and tastes nice toasted. It is made with sunflower oil, not rape, etc and I find this makes a difference. You need to give the diet a bit of time, things probably won't change overnight. Good luck, let me know if you need more info.
10-24-2015, 03:21 PM   #56
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My best food item hands down...potatoes, made anyway. Might not be the most earth shattering ingredient but it's nutritious, goes with pretty much everything and most importantly is kind to my belly
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