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Crohn's Disease Forum » Books, Multimedia, Research & News » Vitamin B2-Faecalibacterium prausnitzii


02-12-2015, 09:37 AM   #1
mf15
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Vitamin B2-Faecalibacterium prausnitzii

First we are missing some Faecalibacterium Prausnitzii,anerobes in both UC and crohns.

In UC
http://www.gastrojournal.org/article...11)60576-3/pdf

in crohns
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23829084
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23216550

How do we feed them.

http://www.google.com/patents/WO2014070014A1?cl=en

This of course would only work if your immune system has not killed them all off.

There is a lot of stuff hidden in patents that will never make it to mainstream IBD treatment.



Old Mike
02-12-2015, 10:19 AM   #2
nogutsnoglory
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The science indicates we are deficient in these probiotics and others but sadly there is no commercial product available for us to to be able to take since it's stuck in a patent. This strain may or may not help but we have no clue and it's frustrating.
02-12-2015, 10:22 AM   #3
mf15
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There is no commercial product because they die when exposed to air.
So like I said if your immune system has not killed them off you can increase
with riboflavin/vitamin B2.
Old Mike
02-12-2015, 10:27 AM   #4
nogutsnoglory
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They could encapsulate them in an air tight pill if they wanted. A lecturer years back said it was promising but I think the patent is in France and nobody is doing anything with it.
02-12-2015, 12:32 PM   #5
wildbill_52280
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interesting post for sure!!
found this http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22607129
I think that riboflavin would be absorbed before it reached the colon, typically bacteria get nutrients via cross feeding from other bacteria that live in close proximity to each other. so its like one symbiotic bacteria would produce riboflavin and it would be within the close reach of f. prausnitzii, dietary supplementation of riboflavin may not help this bacteria grow.

I'd also like to add in japan there is a butyric acid producing bacteria as a probiotic sold over the counter which is Clostridium butyricum, but you can get it on ebay in the usa. I never tried it but it seems since the clostridia species potently modulate inflammatory response, this probiotic could be perfect for IBD.
Supposedly they prescribe this to patients on antibiotics and it protects them from developing c diff, i think i read that somewhere not sure if its true though.


http://www.miyarisan.com/english_index.htm

http://www.ebay.com/itm/MIYARISAN-Mi...-/251578568400
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02-12-2015, 04:42 PM   #6
mf15
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Well actually it looks like in early onset kids there is an overabundance of
Faecalibacterium Prausnitzii which is conflicting with adult CD.
They really are somewhat puzzled by the results.
Decide for yourself I guess.
Old Mike

http://www.nature.com/ajg/journal/v1...g2012335a.html
02-12-2015, 06:38 PM   #7
xeridea
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There's some big money being poured into research in this area. Last year especially J&J invested heavily in 3 microbiome companies coming up with bacterial cocktails to re-jig the gut. Of particular note is the Vedanta Biosciences investment. They have come up with a formulation of 17 Clostridia strains that provides an ecosystem to help facilitate good bacteria repopulation.

If you're interested in this area look into the research of Kenya Honda, one of the principles of Vedanta.
02-12-2015, 09:45 PM   #8
wildbill_52280
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Well actually it looks like in early onset kids there is an overabundance of
Faecalibacterium Prausnitzii which is conflicting with adult CD.
They really are somewhat puzzled by the results.
Decide for yourself I guess.
Old Mike

http://www.nature.com/ajg/journal/v1...g2012335a.html

I recall this study, there is a possibility they made an error, but this is usually why findings need to be replicated at least one other time to solidify it as a scientific fact. As I recall there are more studies that find f. prausnitzii to be not present, then to find it elevated.
02-15-2015, 10:15 PM   #9
kiny
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The issue with commercialising F Prau isn't that it's an anaerobe bacteria, it's that there's no approval to have it regulated as a food or probiotics substance, it's a regulation and funding problem. If you can't get it approved, you can't get funding, the fact it's anaerobe isn't a problem, lots of ways to get around that.

The problem with F Prau has always been getting it past regulators as a food substance, or getting it past regulators as a treatment. Either of those things are required for funding, and because of increased regulations in many countries regarding probiotics, it's hard to get it past regulators. As long as you can't get an approval, and as long as you can't prove there's a commercial platform for it, you don't attract investors.

It was easier to get probiotics approved in the past, there was less regulation, less awareness, it was easy to build a commercial platform when many countries regarded them as food substances. If you want it approved as a treatment, you will need to come up with studies that show it's safe, which requires lots of funding and someone willing to fund it.

Last edited by kiny; 02-15-2015 at 10:39 PM.
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