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Crohn's Disease Forum » Diet, Fitness, and Supplements » SCD and Paleo Diets » Increasing healthy gut bacteria via potato starch


06-01-2015, 11:29 AM   #1
Crohn2357
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Increasing healthy gut bacteria via potato starch

Hello everyone. I want to increase my healthy gut bacteria population but I can't eat fermented foods and can't take probiotic products because they give me severe gastrointestinal problems. I've read some people take potato starch as a prebiotic. For someone with severe dysbiosis and can't take any probiotic bacteria, would taking potato starch daily help to increase healthy gut bacteria population?
My main target is increasing the butyrate producing bacteria and some other bacteria that downregulates inflammation in the colon and give balance to the colonic micro-flora.
As for other prebiotics, I can't eat banana because of fructose and can't find inulin or other prebiotic sources neither seperately nor as a medical product in my country. So I guess the only prebiotic source for me is potato starch.
What do you think?
Another question-- I'm fine with potato but could it in any way hurt me to take potato starch daily? Because manipulating my gut flora generally makes me worse (except antibiotics); but I'm thinking this is a very different approach so it shouldn't cause problems.
Another question-- Would there be any problems with glycoalkaloid content of raw potato starch?
Thanks in advance.
06-01-2015, 12:24 PM   #2
Crohn2357
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It seems that I can't find a good potato starch in my country.

I'm thinking instead of potato starch I can consume cooked& cooled rice and cooked& cooled potato as resistant starch sources. What do you think about that? Would these have good prebiotic effect?
06-01-2015, 01:14 PM   #3
WingedVictory
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I've had issues with fermented milk and water kefir myself and I had to cease use.

I don't really believe there is anyway of guaranteeing whether the prebiotics will feed only good bacteria and not the pathogenic, aggressive strains. You will likely find more success going the antibiotic route, whether it be herbal or pharmaceutical (Rifaxamin). Then assessing any potential issues with intestinal permeability through utilizing a gut healing diet / supplement protocol. Then slowly rebuilding your gut flora from the ground up using strains of probiotics that are communal and promote healthy digestion.

As far as prebiotics, how about sweet potatoes? White potato varieties are a nightshade and research has revealed they have glycoalkyloids (alpha solanine and alpha chaconine) which can degrade intestinal walls and aggravate inflammatory disorders.
06-01-2015, 01:22 PM   #4
Crohn2357
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WingedVictory, I believe cooking process destroys most of the glycoalkaloids in the potato. Potato is, along with rice, my main carb source.

I don't like the taste of sweet potatoes.
06-01-2015, 04:32 PM   #5
wildbill_52280
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Another thing to try would be to boil all the water you drink, as its another source of bacteria in the water supply. It might eliminate the frequency of some flares. MAP has been shown to be in the water supply on occasion. I vaguely recall reverse osmosis can remove bacteria.

This might be helpful.
http://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drin...treatment.html
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06-02-2015, 06:20 AM   #6
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Can you tolerate coconut oil? If not you can try supplementing monolaurin and capyrlic acid to inhibit growth of bad bacteria while growing the good stuff.
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06-02-2015, 07:44 AM   #7
Crohn2357
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Unfortunately, coconut oil is too expensive here.
06-02-2015, 07:54 AM   #8
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https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1 can you order this?
06-02-2015, 07:59 AM   #9
WingedVictory
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I used to eat 2 - 3 tablespoons of coconut oil a day and I can't really say it helped with bacterial dysbiosis / overgrowth. I actually think it might have contributed to my fistula development since it's high in salicylates. So it's off limits for now.

My concern with using it as a natural antifungal and antibacterial is the amount of calories from saturated fat it contains vs no other nutrients. I'm pretty high fat in my diet now so it's not a huge concern, although monounsaturated and omega 3 fats are more valuable I think. I would be skeptical to think that say 3 - 5 tablespoons is killing enough bacteria to justify a large portion of my daily calories coming from coconut oil consumption.

I'm curious if there is any research recommendations of hard numbers of daily servings of coconut oil intake to treat dysbiosis / SIBO? I've never looked into just supplementing the monolaurin, lauric acid, and capyrlic acid separately. Sounds like it could get just as expensive as some of these natural, herbal antibiotics like high potency oregano oil and allicin from garlic.
06-02-2015, 08:06 AM   #10
InstantCoffee
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I used to eat 2 - 3 tablespoons of coconut oil a day and I can't really say it helped with bacterial dysbiosis / overgrowth. I actually think it might have contributed to my fistula development since it's high in salicylates. So it's off limits for now.

My concern with using it as a natural antifungal and antibacterial is the amount of calories from saturated fat it contains vs no other nutrients. I'm pretty high fat in my diet now so it's not a huge concern, although monounsaturated and omega 3 fats are more valuable I think. I would be skeptical to think that say 3 - 5 tablespoons is killing enough bacteria to justify a large portion of my daily calories coming from coconut oil consumption.

I'm curious if there is any research recommendations of hard numbers of daily servings of coconut oil intake to treat dysbiosis / SIBO? I've never looked into just supplementing the monolaurin, lauric acid, and capyrlic acid separately. Sounds like it could get just as expensive as some of these natural, herbal antibiotics like high potency oregano oil and allicin from garlic.
It's all expensive, a sugar free diet is far more effective, a completely carb free diet is almost impossible to maintain though. Ketosis is hard on the body.

Usual stuff I read suggests high-fiber carbs like brown rice but that stuff messes with my gut. Literally the only high fiber carb I can tolerate is oats.
06-02-2015, 08:24 AM   #11
Crohn2357
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I can't order something from an outer website, but thanks.
06-02-2015, 11:37 PM   #12
wildbill_52280
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Can you tolerate coconut oil? If not you can try supplementing monolaurin and capyrlic acid to inhibit growth of bad bacteria while growing the good stuff.

Yes to the coconut oil, make a measureable but not great of a difference. All you need is one gram per meal. We're talking a small little bit here. Too much saturated fat isn't very good for you. I make my own pills with empty pills and a dropper. Take one with every meal to help digestion, this will protect the meal form being fermented by the pathogens that exist in our intestines and allow the good bacteria to get to the food, in other words an antibacterial.
06-03-2015, 12:57 AM   #13
Crohn2357
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this will protect the meal form being fermented by the pathogens that exist in our intestines and allow the good bacteria to get to the food, in other words an antibacterial.
I eat my carbs with lots of cold- or semi cooked, extra virgin olive oil; aiming the same.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10504039
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3002804/
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