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Crohn's Disease Forum » Diet, Fitness, and Supplements » Low Fiber/Residue Diet Support Group


 
04-19-2013, 05:52 PM   #1
nogutsnoglory
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Low Fiber/Residue Diet Support Group

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Welcome to the Low Fiber/Low Residue Diet support group. This thread is for anyone interested in or following this diet. Topics for discussion can include q & a and discussion about the diet, foods that help/hurt inflammation & scar tissue, recipes and resources.

"What is a low-fiber with low-residue diet?

About two thirds of people with small bowel Crohn's disease develop a marked narrowing (or stricture) of the lower small intestine, the ileum. For these patients, a low-fiber with low-residue diet or a special liquid diet may be beneficial in minimizing abdominal pain and other symptoms. This diet minimizes the consumption of foods that add "scrapy" residue to the stool. These include raw fruits, vegetables, and seeds, as well as nuts and corn hulls. The registered dietitian associated with your IBD treatment program can assist you in devising such a diet when appropriate. Often, these dietary adjustments are temporary; the patient follows them until the inflammation that caused the narrowing responds either to medical treatment or to a corrective surgical procedure.

It is important, however, to watch out that you do not impose too many food restrictions on yourself or your child. These limit variety in the diet and make a balanced intake of foods more difficult to achieve." -CCFA

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04-19-2013, 05:54 PM   #2
nogutsnoglory
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I am on this diet by doctors orders due to severe stenosis in my colon and small intestine. I have trouble finding healthy foods to eat on this diet. I would love to incorporate more fruits and vegetables but anything aside from juice scares me. I mainly eat white flour products and dairy. This has helped me gain weight but long term I know this is unhealthy.
04-19-2013, 09:42 PM   #3
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I feel this a science that is often overlooked and needs more resources based on research by the medical community as it is key to help.
04-19-2013, 10:01 PM   #4
nogutsnoglory
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What do you mean Bob? I'm not sure there is much to investigate on this diet. On diet in general absolutely but I wouldn't recommend this diet to anyone who isn't inflamed or stricturing. It's a limited diet and often not the healthiest. It just has the least impact on our bowels.
04-20-2013, 07:23 AM   #5
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I know about this but it is rarely discussed and know others with the problem that didn't even know about it. There aren't monitors that I know of inside patients bad areas knowing what is exactly happening in real time showing how the foods they are eating are reacting. I just think a lot of advice is based on speculation and judgmental theories. Some may be good, some bad. This method supports long term treatments without cure. Just look at the extreme amount of meds and vitamins but no cure.

If people affected knew exactly what was causing their inflammation and how to stop it there would be less amputations and would be a huge development. I believe there are people out there that do have this knowledge but aren't sharing because they are inventing drugs and vitamins to make big profits. The medical community claims there is no know medical cure which is based on science practice and research. If food is a proven answer then specific foods and timing should be prescribed.

When research is geared towards what is making our organs healthy and not what is going to make us healthy we may get answers. Knowledge of curing a Crohn's patients and other medical conditions effecting bodies organs through food would be instrumental in everyone's well being.

Non conflict of interest research would be helpful but that would tame or reconfigure the huge weight loss industry! Capitalism sadly is not conducive to cures where profits are at risk. This is where society morality needs to kick in, but don't get me wrong as there are many, many medical professionals that care and are making good strides but are disadvantaged because of the capitalistic system. I told a doctor that I like to try natural methods first before trying meds and laughed at me and said all things in the universe are natural. This is a undeserving horrible condition and hopefully in the future can be avoided. Just saying...
04-20-2013, 09:10 PM   #6
nogutsnoglory
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I think there is a lot if opportunity to study integrative nutrition and natural supplementation. It's a bit hard to do a clinical trial on diet because you can't monitor what people eat and control what they do.

I think the premise of the low fiber diet is simply to eat foods that have demonstrated not to further damage the inflamed gut. I'm not sure there is much more that can be done in that area in terms of research.
04-21-2013, 08:15 AM   #7
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I don't know exactly how a low fibre/low residue diet helps me, but I know that it does reduce my symptoms to a significant degree, so I'm pleased to have this group.

I don't have any strictures or anything like that, so I do eat some insoluble fibre, and can do so without noticable ill effects. So if I really want an apple, I can have one, but I'm not about to start having a bowl of bran for breakfast or start snacking on nuts.

I am on this diet by doctors orders due to severe stenosis in my colon and small intestine. I have trouble finding healthy foods to eat on this diet. I would love to incorporate more fruits and vegetables but anything aside from juice scares me. I mainly eat white flour products and dairy. This has helped me gain weight but long term I know this is unhealthy.
Have you tried canned fruit? Ripe bananas and avocados are also easier to digest from this perspective. Soups are good also. Root vegetables like carrots, parsnips and turnips, if pealed and cooked well, are easier to digest than other vegetables. Nut butters are also useful. I'm not sure if all these fully comply with criteria for a low fibre/residue diet, but I do know they're less likely to cause problems than most other fruits.
04-21-2013, 11:59 AM   #8
Sarah50
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After following this diet and being on Asacol for 2 months... ALL my symptoms went away! I still follow this diet pretty much because I'm afraid if I don't, I'll have worse problems because of the stricture. However, I have been eating food that I couldn't eat while flaring and it's not giving me any problems (Crohn's symptoms). Am I headed for trouble if I don't stay completely on the low residue diet? I worry about the stricture getting worse if I don't.

Does anyone have experience to know if this is true or not?

Thanks for creating this group, Noguts!
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I seem to be in remission: I believe from the Asacol / Low Residue Diet / Probiotics and NO STRESS!
04-28-2013, 06:05 PM   #9
nogutsnoglory
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Sarah I think it depends on the severity of your stricture. Is it mostly inflammation or scar tissue? You can do some experimentation but if things get worse you know you need to stick with this diet.

What are everyone's thoughts on oatmeal? I have seen it on some low fiber diets and some say to avoid it. I'm scared of it but maybe strained oatmeal is ok?
04-29-2013, 06:09 AM   #10
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What are everyone's thoughts on oatmeal? I have seen it on some low fiber diets and some say to avoid it. I'm scared of it but maybe strained oatmeal is ok?
I do alright with oatmeal. I believe oats contain both soluble and insoluble fibre, so they're hot as difficult to digest as things like wholemeal bread or bran, but they aren't low fibre/low residue, and probably pose more of a problem to people who have troubles with fibre than white rice, white bread, etc. Oatmeal I find quite filling though, which isn't good given my appetite problems.
04-29-2013, 02:21 PM   #11
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I don't have strictures, but my large intestine is covered in scar tissue. My doctor wants me to stay on low residue.
I eat a lot of peeled potatoes. There are many different ways to cook them, I like them mashed, with some cheese added for flavour, kind of like twice baked potatoes without the peels. Bananas and melons are good, and lettuce. Some canned fruits like pineapple give me pain. Soup is good. I don't eat much red meat, mostly chicken and turkey. Rice is also versatile, fried rice is quick and easy. Ethnic foods give me variety, like perogies and Cantonese take out.
04-29-2013, 03:23 PM   #12
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I don't do low-res regularly, but if I get any symptoms then I jump right on the low-res diet until I'm feeling better. I don't have any strictures that I know of, but low-res helps me feel better whenever I have a bad tummy day.

With regards to oatmeal - I only seem to be able to eat it when I'm in remission. And even then, it has to be mushy and soft. I can't have crunchy oatmeal like in a cookie or a granola bar, that stuff causes me nothing but trouble!

I know a lot of fruit & veggies are high-fiber, and I cannot tolerate most fruit & veg, but I can juice almost anything and tolerate it just fine. I'm not sure if juicing is considered low-res? Even when I'm feeling unwell I can still tolerate juice, so I still juice when I'm doing low-res.
04-29-2013, 03:54 PM   #13
nogutsnoglory
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I read that strained oatmeal may be OK for low fiber but I am not sure how one goes about straining oatmeal? I never liked it that much and the thought of that bulk going through my intestines scares me! The only good thing is it's an easy fast breakfast type food and it has a decent amount of protein while allowing more variety in my bland diet.
04-29-2013, 04:27 PM   #14
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I have no idea how you would strain oatmeal! That sounds like it would be messy and difficult, and I would think you'd get hardly anything out of it.

It is an easy breakfast, but there aren't many breakfast foods that are super difficult or time-consuming to cook. Scrambled eggs are one of my go-to foods, and I've been known to have pancakes for dinner.
04-29-2013, 08:27 PM   #15
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Scrambled eggs are one of my go-to foods, and I've been known to have pancakes for dinner.
I like the way you think :-) I love breakfast foods and especially pancakes for dinner! I haven't officially gone gluten free, although try eat gf when I can, but I was surprised how much I like the Gluten Free Bisquick pancake mix. Yummy!
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04-29-2013, 09:36 PM   #16
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I forgot Cream of Wheat, or farina. This is quick to make, tasty and filling. I often make the Finnish version which is traditionally cooked in Lingonberry juice, but since I can't find any here I use cranberry and a little sugar.
04-30-2013, 02:19 AM   #17
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I forgot Cream of Wheat, or farina. This is quick to make, tasty and filling. I often make the Finnish version which is traditionally cooked in Lingonberry juice, but since I can't find any here I use cranberry and a little sugar.
If you live in the U.S., IKEA sells a number of lingonberry products, including juice, jam, syrup and lingonberries.
04-30-2013, 06:57 AM   #18
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Ikea has so many yummy desserts. God bless the Swedes!
04-30-2013, 07:51 AM   #19
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I'm in Ontario, the closest Ikea is an 8 hour drive unfortunately. I'll have to ask my local deli if they can bring some in. Lingonberries are very good for you, being antioxidants.
05-01-2013, 09:06 AM   #20
nogutsnoglory
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Do they have tiny seeds though? I know I was told to avoid berries because of the skin and seeds.
05-01-2013, 09:16 AM   #21
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I have a juicer, I want to cook with the juice. They're on the tart side anyway.
We have a Finnish dessert, kiisseli, which is a fruit or berry soup made of berries and water, or juice, sweetener and potato starch to thicken it. You can eat it as is, or put it on rice pudding, ice cream etc. I have a sweet tooth....
05-01-2013, 12:59 PM   #22
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I like low residue, it works for me when I have urgency & frequency.
I also like this;
http://www.whnt.nhs.uk/directorates/...idue_diet.html

When I'm flaring I like to stick to breakfast food too!
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05-01-2013, 01:06 PM   #23
nogutsnoglory
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Astra that site seems to heavily restrict fruits and veggies. I don't know how safe this one is but it is from the National Institutes of Health so I imagine it's reliable.

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/e...ons/000200.htm
05-03-2013, 04:48 PM   #24
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Astra that site seems to heavily restrict fruits and veggies. I don't know how safe this one is but it is from the National Institutes of Health so I imagine it's reliable.

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/e...ons/000200.htm

I tend to switch between this advice and the advice given on the NHS site that Astra gave a link for. The NHS advice is very good for "bad" days but is very restrictive if you need to follow low residue for any length of time. I tend to include the fruit and veg listed in the NIH advice, in moderation. I don't risk more than about three small portions of fruit and veg a day. If I feel any discomfort, then I go straight back to the NHS advice and eat mostly rice, cheese, and white bread for a couple of days!
05-04-2013, 05:50 AM   #25
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I tend to switch between this advice and the advice given on the NHS site that Astra gave a link for. The NHS advice is very good for "bad" days but is very restrictive if you need to follow low residue for any length of time. I tend to include the fruit and veg listed in the NIH advice, in moderation. I don't risk more than about three small portions of fruit and veg a day. If I feel any discomfort, then I go straight back to the NHS advice and eat mostly rice, cheese, and white bread for a couple of days!
That sounds sensible. I agree that a completely low fibre diet would not be the best thing long term, in particular with the restrictions placed on fruit and veg. I do tend to eat low fibre long term, whether or not I'm flaring, as too much seems make me more uncomfortable and gives me diarrhoea even when I'm not at my worst. But because I don't follow the diet strictly, I manage to get a reasonable amount and variety of fruit and vegetables, and even occasionally whole grains.

A few things on those linked pages do seem to contradict each other. I noticed biscuits are not allowed on the Wirral list, though I've never had problems with them. Also both lists limit the amount of milk and related dairy products, which I'd never thought of as high in fibre, and I must eat over that amount of milk in a day - I find yoghurts, custards, ice cream, etc. go down easy when I'm not feeling well.
05-04-2013, 01:41 PM   #26
nogutsnoglory
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It does seem the NIH list is more liberal. I'd be scared to fully follow it but I want to experiment adding more fruits and veg since my dairy and wheat diet is not healthy.
05-06-2013, 02:11 PM   #27
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Sorry peeps, I should've said, this diet was given to me after surgery (hysterectomy)
It is restrictive, and I've used it many times, but only if I'm in agony! Then I slowly reintroduce veg and fruit back in.
Here's another link, American I think, but it's good, and it's got veg and fruit!
http://www.hhsc.ca/documents/Patient...tFoods-trh.pdf
05-20-2013, 03:34 PM   #28
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Just wondering what other peoples experiences are when they go off the low residue diet? I currently have a stricture in my colon, and have just started Humira. I have been following a fairly strict low residue diet, and apart from tiredness and some constipation, I don't feel any real pain or discomfort.

Yesterday, I fell off the wagon slightly and had one slice of flapjack (containing oats and desiccated coconut) and one rock cake (containing about 10 raisins). Today, I have had extreme bloating, discomfort, and pain. Could this really be the result of such a small amount of fibre?!
05-20-2013, 03:42 PM   #29
nogutsnoglory
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It is definitely possible because the insoluble fiber might be scraping raw inflamed tissue in your stricture. If Humira is successful at opening up your stricture you may be able to resume a diet with more fiber.
05-21-2013, 05:46 AM   #30
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Just wondering what other peoples experiences are when they go off the low residue diet? I currently have a stricture in my colon, and have just started Humira. I have been following a fairly strict low residue diet, and apart from tiredness and some constipation, I don't feel any real pain or discomfort.

Yesterday, I fell off the wagon slightly and had one slice of flapjack (containing oats and desiccated coconut) and one rock cake (containing about 10 raisins). Today, I have had extreme bloating, discomfort, and pain. Could this really be the result of such a small amount of fibre?!
I'm not sure. For me, it's only when I've eaten fibre in large quantities that it becomes an issue. My reaction is delayed by a few days. So if I ate a large bowl of bran and a big salad every day, then I'd probably start experiencing symptoms (my stomach much more uncomfortable, diarrhoea more severe and more frequent) after about three days. And similarly, if I then replaced the bran with low-fibre cornflakes, and replaced the salad with easy-to-digest bananas, my symptoms would change back to their normal levels after eating this for a couple of days.

If I ate what you did - one flapjack and one rock cake, I don't think I'd notice any ill effects from it. But you might be a lot more sensitive than me, especially if you have a stricture.

The only way to know for sure is to see if the effects are consistent. So if you go back to your low residue diet now, and feel fine in a couple of days, it suggests the flapjack and cake may be responsible. If you have more bad symptoms when back on your low residue diet, the fibre probably wasn't responsible.

And if you stick to your low residue diet and your symptoms are consistent, you can then test different types and quantities of fibre, if you don't mind risking provoking your symptoms again. If a flapjack and a rock cake consistently produce a worsening of symptoms, you have your answer.
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