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12-14-2012, 02:19 PM   #91
David
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Every drop of sweat is illness crying.
Holy crap. Put this on a t-shirt and I'll be your first order.
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12-14-2012, 02:21 PM   #92
Cat-a-Tonic
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I actually stole that saying and paraphrased it for myself. I saw on some fitness website there was a slogan that said that "every drop of sweat is just your fat crying" but I really don't have much fat so I modified it to fit me instead.

Edited to add: I wish that saying applied to night sweats too. Ha ha!
12-15-2012, 06:07 PM   #93
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David, you talk about eating liverwurst, but not about eating the organ meats (offal) themselves. If you can get these from your organic or grass fed animal supplier they are amazingly good for you. I eat kidneys, liver, and brains regularly, heart and tripe occasionally. The first two are excellent sources of iron (one of the reasons for my high readings of iron, I think). Brains or sweetbreads once a week will give even pregnant women all the folate that they need without any artificial supplementation. And offal has lots of other benefits.

The other valuable source of iron that I use is black strap molasses (again organic, of course). It has high content of iron, manganese, copper, calcium, potassium, magnesium, vitamin B6. It also has a low glycemic index. I use it on my oat porridge in the mornings and in warm milk at night (and always lick the spoon!). If you are looking for natural sources of minerals BS molasses has to rate very highly.
12-16-2012, 09:08 PM   #94
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It was my birthday yesterday so I haven't been spending much time online or updating. Let's just say I fell off the wagon, got trampled by the horses then fell off a cliff. Heheh.

Lower right gut pain - 2
Costochondritis - 1
Eye inflammation - 2
General aches - 1
Happy Scale - 7
12-18-2012, 11:22 PM   #95
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Hi Susan, sorry it took me awhile to respond.
David, you talk about eating liverwurst, but not about eating the organ meats (offal) themselves. If you can get these from your organic or grass fed animal supplier they are amazingly good for you. I eat kidneys, liver, and brains regularly, heart and tripe occasionally. The first two are excellent sources of iron (one of the reasons for my high readings of iron, I think). Brains or sweetbreads once a week will give even pregnant women all the folate that they need without any artificial supplementation. And offal has lots of other benefits.
I eat the liverwurst specifically because it contains the organ meats (liver, kidneys and heart). I don't eat brain though. Does that contain nutrients not found elsewhere?

The other valuable source of iron that I use is black strap molasses (again organic, of course). It has high content of iron, manganese, copper, calcium, potassium, magnesium, vitamin B6. It also has a low glycemic index. I use it on my oat porridge in the mornings and in warm milk at night (and always lick the spoon!). If you are looking for natural sources of minerals BS molasses has to rate very highly.
I purchased some black strap molasses awhile back but haven't been eating it. I'll see if I can get back into that habit. I DO utilize it in an organic fertilizer I use on my plants though
12-18-2012, 11:24 PM   #96
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I've been feeling pretty darn good.

Lower right gut pain - 1
Costochondritis - 1
Eye inflammation - 2
General aches - 1
Happy Scale - 7

Today I made bone broth for the first time which I then used as the base for a new batch of soup. HOLY CRAP is it delicious! I made a chicken bone broth by boiling the chicken bones for about 12 hours with a little apple cider vinegar. My soup was good before, but now it is WONDERFUL. I'm excited about the potential health benefits from all the new nutrients as well.

I received some bison and beef knuckles today which I'll make into broth in the future. I'm sold on this stuff

I also had a root beer float for dessert though. Normally that wouldn't be that big of a deal, but the root beer had sodium benzoate in it. Shame on me
12-18-2012, 11:36 PM   #97
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I make soup from carcasses all the time but I've never used vinegar. That's interesting.
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12-19-2012, 12:12 AM   #98
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From what I read, the acidity helps remove nutrients from the carcass.
12-19-2012, 12:16 AM   #99
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I love roasting chickens. I usually pay about $8 for a medium sized bird and I get 4 or 5 meals out of it between two chicken dinners for a family of four, followed by about 3.5 gallons of soup from the carcass.

It's best when you have two carcasses, I've found. You can fit both in a lobster pot (or a similarly sized pot) and the broth you get has more flavor (and I'd guess more nutrients). I do two in the same roasting pan if there's going to be guests or I just want more leftovers.

I usually stuff the chickens with lemons and onions (I just slot the lemons' skin and stuff the whole fruit in there, the onions I slice up) rather than bread stuffing. The citrus flavor is imparted to the meat and it doesn't dry it like bread stuffing would. I usually toss the lemons in the broth, I wonder if they would have a similar effect?
12-19-2012, 07:04 PM   #100
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From what I read, the acidity helps remove nutrients from the carcass.
You can also add organic, clean eggshells. Bundle them in cheesecloth and tie shut with string. Float them in the soup and fish out when you're done simmering. The vinegar also helps leach calcium and minerals from the eggshells. All eggshells, whether added to the soup or not, then go into the compost pile after being whizzed in the blender with water.
12-21-2012, 04:42 PM   #101
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My costochondritis has flared back up a bit Frankly, I'm not sure why. Obviously it may have nothing to do with food. The only real thing I changed up was adding bananas back in which I've wondered about a little so I've cut them back out and will test them again in the future. Another possibility diet wise is this is a delayed reaction to my birthday binge. Kinda frustrating though because my chest was feeling SO GOOD for a short time there. The good news is my eye is doing great which is usually a leading indicator for my gut.

Lower right gut pain - 1
Costochondritis - 4
Eye inflammation - 1
General aches - 1
Happy Scale - 7
12-22-2012, 01:49 PM   #102
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My costochondritis is now back to feeling great.

I'm confused and don't know what to think or do. I guess it's possible that cutting out bananas again could have this drastic an effect if that was the cause but... oh hell... I don't know. At least I feel good though!

Lower right gut pain - 1
Costochondritis - 1
Eye inflammation - 1
General aches - 1
Happy Scale - 7
12-23-2012, 12:05 PM   #103
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I've been struggling with some pretty bad diarrhea the last 18 hours or so. I'm going to assume it it just a stomach bug or food poisoning as I've been one of the lucky few percent that hasn't had much of a problem with that. I accidentally ate a LOT of normal pasta which MAY be the culprit. I normally eat gluten free pasta on the rare occasion I do eat it but my wife made some normal pasta and didn't tell me. Not her fault though, I was the idiot who accidentally bought the stuff in the first place.

My eye inflammation is back as well. I've been pondering that and I'm going to try cutting out the carrot juice for a few days to see if that makes a difference. I hadn't drank any for a couple days and my eye was feeling better then yesterday I drank a ton and bam. I drink a LOT too. Just a little experiment

Lower right gut pain - 1
Costochondritis - 1
Eye inflammation - 4
General aches - 1
Happy Scale - 7
12-23-2012, 02:38 PM   #104
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Hmm interesting about the carrot juice, I don't see any reason why it would aggravate the eyes but who knows. Maybe you overdosed on Vitamin A? Although dietary vitamin A overdose is nearly impossible.

The pasta might also be the culprit here especially if it were white pasta. Refined carbs will increase your glycemic index and cause oxidative stress and inflammation.

If you have them, include some kiwi's and swiss chard. Both are high in the antioxidant lutein which is amazing for our eyes.

http://www.naturalnews.com/010203_lu...ye_health.html

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12-28-2012, 08:37 AM   #105
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My eye inflammation has been going down quite nicely but I'd estimate it to be a 1.5-2 still. The, "this is kinda annoying" range. I have cut out the carrot juice but have still been eating carrots from the garden. I'm going to try cutting them out and see what happens. I realize it doesn't make much sense but I got the idea because my wife has a carrot allergy and her eyes get all red with them sometimes. It's not a strong theory on my part but it's all an experiment

Gianni, the pasta I eat is gluten free and is rice, quinoa, or flax based or a combination thereof. I do try to limit my intake of it but my wife gets a pasta craving every 10 days or so.

Lower right gut pain - 1
Costochondritis - 1
Eye inflammation - 2
General aches - 2
Happy Scale - 5

I've been pretty moody the last few days. I'm not sure why. My lack of aerobic exercise no doubt doesn't help.

I've been eating some kiwi as well The swiss chard at our local store didn't look good to me and the ones I planted got decimated by bugs
12-28-2012, 08:49 AM   #106
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What issues are carrots likely to cause with eyes, specifically? I know that I've heard that carrots are good for eyes, but what do they do specifically? Is this just a correlation thing for you that you're trying out?

I've been having a lot of trouble with my right eye ever since Izzy (then 2 years old) put her fingernail through my cornea directly over my pupil last year. I saw an opthamologist last week who prescribed regular application of hypertonic solution to help heal/close a "bubble" that's formed in my cornea over the injury. I wonder if some sort of supplementation might help ensure healing so that I can avoid any sort of laser surgery, which scares the life out of me.

I guess I wandered off topic a bit here... sorry. :-)

Based on this thread I am eager to start supplementing with Mg and journal my own results with just that, but I'm wondering if I should wait until I'm at baseline bowel-wise for the best picture.
12-28-2012, 09:12 AM   #107
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Frankly Muppet, I don't know what issue they would cause. Let's look at just one aspect from Linus Pauling:
Isomers of retinoic acid (RA) act as hormones to affect gene expression and thereby influence numerous physiological processes. All-trans-RA and 9-cis-RA are transported to the nucleus of the cell bound to cytoplasmic retinoic acid-binding proteins (CRABP). Within the nucleus, RA binds to retinoic acid receptor proteins (diagram). Specifically, all-trans-RA binds to retinoic acid receptors (RAR) and 9-cis-RA binds to retinoid X receptors (RXR). RAR and RXR form RAR/RXR heterodimers; these heterodimers bind to regulatory regions of the chromosome called retinoic acid response elements (RARE). A dimer is a complex of two protein molecules. Heterodimers are complexes of two different proteins, while homodimers are complexes of two of the same protein. Binding of all-trans-RA and 9-cis-RA to RAR and RXR respectively allows the complex to regulate the rate of gene transcription, thereby influencing the synthesis of certain proteins. RXR may also form heterodimers with thyroid hormone receptors (THR) or vitamin D receptors (VDR). In this way, vitamin A, thyroid hormone, and vitamin D may interact to influence gene transcription (3). Through the stimulation and inhibition of transcription of specific genes, retinoic acid plays a major role in cellular differentiation, the specialization of cells for highly specific physiological roles. Many of the physiological effects attributed to vitamin A appear to result from its role in cellular differentiation.
So who knows what could be happening due to my high consumption of carrots but it's definitely affecting all kinds of stuff, much of which I don't understand and even more that science has no idea about yet. I just went and looked at the bottle of carrot juice I get from Costco and it says it contains the juice of 17 carrots. I was consuming one of those every two days and on top of that, another 1-2 carrots fresh from the garden. So around 8 carrots per day for a prolonged period. I believe too much of a good thing can turn into a bad thing so I'm testing the possibility. If my eye inflammation disappears and stays gone, at some point I'll reintroduce carrots and see if it comes back.

I believe that we were once in much greater tune with the goings-on of our bodies. We didn't eat our food while being distracted by TV then jump on the computer and post on a forum. We'd eat our food and feel. We might feel for awhile that our bodies craved carrots so we'd consume them because they were in season. Then our bodies in one form or another would crave something else because that's what we needed and carrots were out of season so we'd move on and eat other stuff. Our body's would get a break from that specific food for awhile and other processes could take over. Now many of us (myself to a severe extent) are emotional eaters. I crave doritos and chocolate, not what I really need or don't need and I haven't been paying attention to the subtle signals my body sends me. So now it's screaming at me.

I'm trying to listen to my body and understand what it's trying to tell me.
12-28-2012, 09:18 AM   #108
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I think you're probably right that without modern distractions (and modern variety of available foodstuffs) it was probably easier to correlate health/body changes with diet changes, but with delayed effects and trying not to be eaten by bears and all, I don't know how wide that gap could be.

I probably don't need egg nog and whiskey, though, so there's that.

I've been craving whole milk (has to be whole) like CRAZY for 3 weeks solid now. I've been drinking so much of Izzy's milk that I have to buy an extra gallon almost every week. Intuitively I suspect it's bad for my Crohn's and that's why I almost never drink it, and I KNOW it's bad for my asthma, but I've been insatiably craving it for about 23 days now. It's odd to have such a very specific craving.
12-28-2012, 09:31 AM   #109
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I don't think it's odd at all. I think it's quite natural and the body saying, "I need this or these specific nutrients". The question is whether that need is being met by what you're consuming or not. If a pregnant woman is iron deficient and starts eating ice cubes because of it, obviously that isn't going to help and yet that's exactly what happens to many.

If it was me, I would run an experiment. I'd consume what I was craving unless I knew it to be unhealthy and see if it satiated my craving after a short time. If it did and I didn't experience any adverse affects, then that's great. If it didn't satiate my craving, then I'd know I'm probably not getting what I need and see if I could figure something else out. If I was craving milk and what I purchased from the store wasn't helping, I'd personally seek out raw milk to try that, but that's just me and many would disagree with that idea.

I agree that the delayed effects can be problematic. But if all I'm eating is 5-15 organic, whole foods, then it's not too hard to figure out when something is going wrong. If I'm eating 20-40 processed foods each of which contain 20+ ingredients, many completely unnatural, then it's much harder to figure out where the reaction is coming from.

I'm admittedly grasping at straws here but I seem to get lucky once in awhile and the long term trend I've been experiencing over the last two years and been towards improved health. It's hard not to get frustrated at times and frankly, I do. I think that's where some of my binges come from. But I feel in my heart that I can feel well again and my long term health will actually benefit from all of this as I reconnect to what is optimal for my body.
12-28-2012, 09:48 AM   #110
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No I think your argument about a small number of organic whole foods makes a lot of sense. I wouldn't call it grasping at straws. I wish it were more feasible for me to do it. I can certainly make some changes in that direction. My hurdles will be budget, availability, and the fact that my tiny plot of land has clay soil and doesn't readily grow much of anything.
12-28-2012, 10:03 AM   #111
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Budget and availability are certainly hurdles. Your clay plot is absolutely not. If you actually want a cool garden, I'd suggest starting here. People don't have to grow their own food like me though. Finding local farmers markets and connecting with the local growers who are passionate about growing healthy food would be a good step.
12-28-2012, 10:08 AM   #112
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We have local co-ops that will sell you a box of miscellaneous seasonal stuff for a decent price, but it's more expensive than the grocery store and we just instituted a very strict budget to get our finances under control. And in the winter you're back to the grocery store unless you buy double or triple during the growing season and then get into canning.

I think my dream is a raised plot and/or greenhouse, but I'm not sure if I have room for the latter and I have to be careful of my electric use, as utility rates are sky high in CT, and my water use (well goes dry with too much watering, and uses electricity, too).

Aside from the cost I think my biggest "obstacle" are two special needs kids and the fact that my wife and I work alternate schedules. It's a worthwhile thing to do but it'll take serious planning.
12-28-2012, 03:03 PM   #113
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I feel like my lack of aerobic exercise casts a shadow on everything I'm doing here. It is so important yet I haven't been doing it. Enough of that BS. Starting today, I'm setting aside time like Cat-a-Tonic suggested. 5-6pm today is aerobic exercise time.

Someone get the defibrillator ready.
01-01-2013, 07:52 PM   #114
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My gut is a mess right now. Two days ago my wife made a mung dal with onions which I theorize may set me off (onions that is). I've also been eating tomatoes from the garden which is different than normal and I've wondered about tomatoes. Then of course last night we went to a party for New Years and I not only fell off the wagon, I shot and ate the horses. So who knows what the culprit(s) are.

Lower right gut pain - 6
Costochondritis - 1
Eye inflammation - 2
General aches - 2
Happy Scale - 5

I've been doing aerobic exercises each day at least. Though I skipped it today as my gut hurts too much.
01-02-2013, 05:48 PM   #115
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David, were the onions cooked or raw? That seems to make a difference for me, I can do cooked onions just fine but raw ones cause me trouble. Tomatoes cause me trouble too - they don't hurt, but they don't digest either and I always pass bits of undigested tomato (skins, seeds, and flesh - none of it breaks down for me) when I eat it. And I'm presuming you mean alcohol when you talk about the wagon and the horses? I was brave enough to have 1/2 a glass of white wine on New Year's eve but that is my limit, any more than that would do me in so I'm not surprised that you're feeling poorly after a night of (I'm presuming) drinks.

I'm glad to hear you're exercising regularly! I don't do enough cardio myself either, I lift weights a lot and that's my favorite thing so other forms of exercise sometimes get neglected. I recently got an exercise bike though and I am trying to ride it for at least 20 minutes every day that I don't lift weights. That way, even if I can't make it to the gym, I can still get some exercise at home. I did weights Monday, cardio & yoga yesterday, weights today, and I'm planning for cardio tomorrow and weights on Friday. I also ate crap that did awful things to me over the holidays (salad, eek!), but I find that if I can manage to exercise anyway, more often than not I wind up feeling great during and afterwards. I am having that day today in fact, I felt yucky all morning with nausea and many bathroom trips due to poor recent food choices, but I marched myself to the gym anyway, felt fantastic during my workout and feel pretty good now. No more nausea and I feel energized. Anyway, that's my two cents. I hope you recover soon from all the holiday food and drink naughtiness.
01-02-2013, 06:38 PM   #116
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The onions were cooked Cat. As for the wagon and horses: alcohol, gluten, yeast, and got knows what kind of ingredients in the amazingly delicious Colombian food I was eating in gargantuan amounts. Luckily things have calmed down quite a bit already:

Lower right gut pain - 3
Costochondritis - 1
Eye inflammation - 2
General aches - 2
Happy Scale - 7

I was back exercising again today. Setting side some time like you suggested has made a huge difference. Thank you so much for that suggestion
01-02-2013, 07:16 PM   #117
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I'm glad that's working for you! I can never quite tell if I'm a normal person or not, ha ha, I'm such a creature of habit that planning time for exercise is just what works for me. Plus the fact that I literally can't just drop everything and work out - I have to prepare by not eating for several hours, loading up on Tums, etc. It's a commitment for sure but it's what works for me! Very glad to hear you're doing well with it too. You are absolutely doing your body a huge favor by exercising regularly - I only ever feel like a normal healthy person when I am working out, and if I go a few days without exercise, I definitely feel worse. I know that's only anecdotal evidence, but it's all I really need to keep up with my exercise.
01-05-2013, 11:41 AM   #118
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I hope you're feeling better by now, David.

Based on your endorsements of Mg, I picked up a Magnesium/Calcium/Zinc supplement that provides 133mg of magnesium (as magnesium oxide) per pill, with a recommendation of 3 pills per day. I'm curious to see what, if any effect there is.
01-05-2013, 11:42 AM   #119
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How much zinc per pill?
01-05-2013, 12:55 PM   #120
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5mg
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