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04-27-2010, 09:53 AM   #1
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Vitamin D has many benefits

Here is an article very recent from a Toronto doctor who is in our local paper weekly about some good medical topics. It doesn't mention Crohn's but it does mention colon cancer and other disease, a worth while read!

http://www.thepost.ca/ArticleDisplay...RD-JONES%20M.D.

I take it now everyday! Cheers.
04-27-2010, 10:19 AM   #2
CrohnsHobo
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Pretty much what the Dr. at UCLA told me a few months back. He said to take at least 2000 IU a day. Have everyday since.
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04-27-2010, 05:28 PM   #3
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Yeah I hear ya, but believe it or not only about 40% are on vitamin D and they are active or older. Since outside activities are not the average person's usual or daily thing, more diseases could arise. Strange when I was a kid and no computers and 5 channels on a TV (like if the Prez of US was on tv, that covered all channels lol) and I have Crohn's and my sibs have it too so makes you wonder. I was a milk drinker then too, Vitamin D. Once in my teen years, that is when my symptoms started. Just makes you wonder, all these new "new found" articles if they are true and helps who?
04-29-2010, 10:30 PM   #4
mspaghettio
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This might be a stupid question, but I've been wondering and this article mentions it. Since my doctor is recommending "immune modulators" because he says basically my immune system is in overdrive, should I be avoiding things that "boost" your immune system? Seems like somehow it would be counterproductive.
04-30-2010, 03:02 AM   #5
David in Seattle
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mspaghettio said:
This might be a stupid question, but I've been wondering and this article mentions it. Since my doctor is recommending "immune modulators" because he says basically my immune system is in overdrive, should I be avoiding things that "boost" your immune system? Seems like somehow it would be counterproductive.
I'd say that's a very good question. So many things are said to "boost the immune system", not just foods, but even things like laughter, I've always wondered how strong the actual science was behind such claims. I'm guessing any impact vitamin D would have in that regard would be fairly minimal compared to the IBD process itself, but maybe someone else has some better information.

Interestingly, the link also states "The Japanese study also revealed another shocking fact, that children not receiving D were six times more likely to suffer asthma attacks.", which one might expect would be the other way around, if the vitamin made the immune system hyperactive.

Living in the northern-most major city in the lower 48 states (not to mention one of the cloudiest) I take vitamin D in fairly large quantities.
04-30-2010, 07:13 AM   #6
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Residents of cities at a latitude above 35degrees north which includes Boston, Philadelphia and all of Canada can stand outside in the noon day sun naked from October to February and not manufacture one IU of vitamin D due to the angle of the sun's rays at that time.

Any one up to testing this? LOL
04-30-2010, 07:36 AM   #7
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Dustin said:
Residents of cities at a latitude above 35degrees north which includes Boston, Philadelphia and all of Canada can stand outside in the noon day sun naked from October to February and not manufacture one IU of vitamin D due to the angle of the sun's rays at that time.

Any one up to testing this? LOL
Ha, and what scare all the wildlife away?? And dont have to worry about the bears, only the -40c cold frigid weather Ask Nyx she is brave enough .
04-30-2010, 12:04 PM   #8
Lydia
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Immune modulators are not the same as immune boosters. Modulators balance the immune system. Balancing will bring down the overactivity. Boosters will increase activity.
04-30-2010, 04:50 PM   #9
D Bergy
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I personally feel that an "overactive" immune system is not an accurate term. If it was actually overactive then Low Dose Naltrexone would not work as a treatment, as it boosts and/or modulates the immune system.

Over active and under active are simplistic terms attempting to describe a complex immune system process. A better term is dysfunctional immune system.

It also stands to reason that people were exposed to far more sunlight in all of history than we are now. We are designed to have and use a level of vitamin D that we often do not get due to modern living.

Not all people process D from sun exposure at the same efficiency. The older you are, the less effect you get in general. The only way to know if your level of D is adequate is to get it tested. I have mine tested whenever I go to the doctor. My level dropped in half in the Winter even supplementing with 2,000 iu of D-3. Now I know I need much more in the Winter. I take 2,000 iu in the Summer and three times that amount in the Winter. I will have to wait for my next test to see if the Winter dosage is enough.

Dan
04-30-2010, 04:54 PM   #10
David in Seattle
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More on this:

Supplemental Vitamin D May Help Reduce Breast Cancer

Am J Clin Nutr. Published online April 14, 2010.

Vitamin D from supplements may reduce the risk for breast cancer in women with relatively low vitamin D intakes, suggest study findings published online April 14 ahead of print in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. The study also found a significant inverse trend for higher calcium intakes but no interaction between vitamin D and calcium. However, no associations were found between overall combined vitamin D or calcium intakes from food and supplements and breast cancer risk.

It is unclear whether the possible association between dietary vitamin D and reduced breast cancer risk is confounded or modified by calcium and vice versa, Laura N. Anderson, from Population Studies and Surveillance, Cancer Care Ontario, in Toronto, Canada, and colleagues note in their article. It is also unclear whether the association between dietary vitamin D and breast cancer differs by menopausal status.

To investigate these uncertainties, the researchers used the Ontario Cancer Registry to identify 3101 women aged 25 to 74 years diagnosed between June 2002 and April 2003 with a first pathologically confirmed breast tumor (case patients). The researchers used random-digit dialing methods to identify 3471 matched women without breast cancer (control subjects). All of the women completed an epidemiologic questionnaire and a modified Block food frequency questionnaire that measured 178 foods and supplements.

Supplemental vitamin D at more than 10 g/day (400 IU/day) vs no supplemental vitamin D was associated with a reduced risk for breast cancer (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.59 - 0.98). However, no dose-response relationship was observed.

The study authors note that the mean intake of vitamin D in study subjects was low. Only 13% of case patients and 14% of control subject reported using single-product vitamin D supplements or cod liver oil. No associations were evident between total combined vitamin D intake or vitamin D intake from foods alone and breast cancer risk.

In addition, there were no statistically significant associations between calcium intake from foods, supplements, or total combined intake and breast cancer risk; however, a significant inverse trend was noted across categories of calcium supplement use (P for trend = .04). Calcium supplement use was more common in study participants than was vitamin D supplement use; 33% of case patients and 35% of control subjects took calcium.

Moreover, the results "do not suggest an interaction between calcium and vitamin D intakes, and these 2 variables did not confound each other," according to the researchers. There were also no significant interactions between vitamin D, calcium, or menopausal status, and multivitamin use was not associated with breast cancer risk.

The study authors point out that measuring vitamin D or calcium from foods as opposed to supplements may be more prone to misclassification (potentially biasing results toward the null). It is also possible that foods containing vitamin D and calcium contain other detrimental components that counteract the potential benefits from vitamin D, such as dietary fat in milk. Furthermore, the possibility that the observed associations were the result of chance or residual confounding cannot be ruled out; however, the finding that multivitamin use was not associated with breast cancer risk suggests that the associations are not because of residual confounding by other unmeasured healthy lifestyle traits among supplement users.

Strengths of the study, the authors say, include its large sample size, population-based recruitment of case patients and control subjects, and high response rates.

Limitations of the study include observational design, possible misclassification of measurement of vitamin D or calcium from foods vs supplements, and possible chance results or residual confounding.

"Further research is needed to investigate the effects of higher doses of vitamin D and calcium supplements," the researchers conclude.
05-02-2010, 02:16 AM   #11
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Thanks Penny. I've been thinking of taking this for some time. This has spurred me on.
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05-03-2010, 10:18 AM   #12
Lydia
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I read another study, that it prevents preterm birth and infection during pregnancy for both the mother and the fetus. They had a control group taking 400IU and one group taking 2000IU and another taking 4000IU. The benefits were most pronounced in the 4000IU group. It was neat.
05-12-2010, 12:48 PM   #13
GNC Crohn's Man
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These articles don't differentiate between the 2 man types of Vitamin D. You have Vitamin D2 (Ergocalciferol) and Vitamin D3 (Cholecalciferol). The Vitamin D your body actually uses is Vitamin D3 (Cholecalciferol). With Vitamin D2 (Ergocalciferol) you have to be exposed to sunlight in order for your body to convert Vitamin D2 to Vitamin D3.

Vitamin D2 doesn't do anything unless you get some direct exposure to sunlight. How much sunlight and for how long is something I don't know. You can't overdose on Vitamin D2. You can however overdose on Vitamin D3. You shouldn't take over 1000 IU of Vitamin D3 a day unless your doctor specifically tells you otherwise.

Also what dosage of Vitamin D3 is considered to be way to much? I'm not sure what level will cause problems. I haven't been able to find a Doctor that actually knows the answer to that question. As far as I know several years ago 1000 IU of Vitamin D3 was too much. Some evidence has shown high dosages for short periods of time may help some people. But, I can't remember off the top of my head whither or not those studies were credible. So take a 1000 IU of Vitamin D3 a day. Make sure you take it with a calcium supplement or as part of a calcium supplement.
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05-12-2010, 01:27 PM   #14
CrohnsHobo
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GNC Crohn's Man said:
These articles don't differentiate between the 2 man types of Vitamin D. You have Vitamin D2 (Ergocalciferol) and Vitamin D3 (Cholecalciferol). The Vitamin D your body actually uses is Vitamin D3 (Cholecalciferol). With Vitamin D2 (Ergocalciferol) you have to be exposed to sunlight in order for your body to convert Vitamin D2 to Vitamin D3.

Vitamin D2 doesn't do anything unless you get some direct exposure to sunlight. How much sunlight and for how long is something I don't know. You can't overdose on Vitamin D2. You can however overdose on Vitamin D3. You shouldn't take over 1000 IU of Vitamin D3 a day unless your doctor specifically tells you otherwise.

Also what dosage of Vitamin D3 is considered to be way to much? I'm not sure what level will cause problems. I haven't been able to find a Doctor that actually knows the answer to that question. As far as I know several years ago 1000 IU of Vitamin D3 was too much. Some evidence has shown high dosages for short periods of time may help some people. But, I can't remember off the top of my head whither or not those studies were credible. So take a 1000 IU of Vitamin D3 a day. Make sure you take it with a calcium supplement or as part of a calcium supplement.
I take a 2,000 IU D3 a day as directed by my Dr. at UCLA.
05-12-2010, 02:13 PM   #15
Starrburst12
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http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full...e2=tf_ipsecsha
My doctor told me I could take up to 10,000 IU/day. I don't believe that is necessary so I do not take that much, I take 2000 IU. When I asked how much would be toxic he laughed and said not to worry. But I looked it up on my own.
I have found many different ranges listed in different articles. One stated that 2000 IU/d could cause hypervitaminosis D another claiming over 80,000 IU/day did not cause toxic levels. This artile sums things up pretty good.(Even though it is 10 yrs old.)
My Clinical Chemistry book says that 2hrs./day of sunlight exposure the body will produce enough D3 but doesn't say how much it is exactly. But says the RDA is 200 IU/day. Interestingly this book also stresses that vitamin D is actually a horomone and only referred to as a vitamin because of historical terms. Horomonal control of calcium metabolism works in a feedback loop where calcium, parathryoid horomone and vitamin D control the concentration of calcium in the blood.
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05-12-2010, 04:41 PM   #16
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If you try to find someone who has overdosed on vitamin D-3 it would be a pretty short list. I really do not think it something to worry about too much.

Just have the simple blood test when you see your doctor. I know of people who have double what is considered normal in the blood and they have no problems with it. 40 is considered normal, but that is likely going to be raised in the future, in light of the growing evidence that having more than that will prevent several diseases.

Dan
05-12-2010, 05:17 PM   #17
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It is frustrating because they refuse to test it here, Doc says the test is too expensive. I had a 10 day course of 50,000 IU (I felt GREAT during this tiME!!!) and then 1 pill a month from now on. I asked if I should have more, at least more regular small amounts. He said nope. I am not convinced to be honest but they simply refuse to test it!!!!
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05-12-2010, 05:25 PM   #18
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You could do some sunbathing, and get it that way. It is not really possible here most of the year, but I think you are closer to the equator than I am. Most everyone is.

I suppose you cannot buy D-3 in the store in any meaningful amounts?

I have been taking 5,000 iu and it is spring time. I will be taking 10,000 in the Winter. I have asked quite a few people about this, and they have told me that they take between 5,000 and 10,000 just to keep levels a bit above normal. Of course that depends on sun exposure and climate, but the 2,000 iu I was taking in the Winter still allowed my level to drop from the forties down to twenty.

It takes a lot of it to replace sunlight.

Dan
05-12-2010, 05:33 PM   #19
CrohnsHobo
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D Bergy said:

It takes a lot of it to replace sunlight.

Dan

Makes me think of being a kid. I grew up on the beach and spent every free moment I had at the beach/in the ocean and still ended up getting Crohn's in that time.

With no family history something in me got screwed up. Would love to know what that is someday . . .
05-12-2010, 05:35 PM   #20
D Bergy
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So would I. It would be much easier to prevent future generations from this disease, if we knew what caused ours.

Dan
07-19-2010, 05:24 PM   #21
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I had blood work done 2 months ago and my primary MD told me that my vitamin D level was low so he prescribed it for me to take for 2 months and then to take an OTC until I am retested in Sept. I read an article about Vitamin D and an IBD connection a while back. Interesting connection if you ask me.
07-19-2010, 05:33 PM   #22
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These articles don't differentiate between the 2 man types of Vitamin D. You have Vitamin D2 (Ergocalciferol) and Vitamin D3 (Cholecalciferol). The Vitamin D your body actually uses is Vitamin D3 (Cholecalciferol). With Vitamin D2 (Ergocalciferol) you have to be exposed to sunlight in order for your body to convert Vitamin D2 to Vitamin D3.

Vitamin D2 doesn't do anything unless you get some direct exposure to sunlight. How much sunlight and for how long is something I don't know. You can't overdose on Vitamin D2. You can however overdose on Vitamin D3. You shouldn't take over 1000 IU of Vitamin D3 a day unless your doctor specifically tells you otherwise.

Also what dosage of Vitamin D3 is considered to be way to much? I'm not sure what level will cause problems. I haven't been able to find a Doctor that actually knows the answer to that question. As far as I know several years ago 1000 IU of Vitamin D3 was too much. Some evidence has shown high dosages for short periods of time may help some people. But, I can't remember off the top of my head whither or not those studies were credible. So take a 1000 IU of Vitamin D3 a day. Make sure you take it with a calcium supplement or as part of a calcium supplement.

An update incase you wanna see this. I am getting close to 50 and two resections.
http://www.crohnsforum.com/showthrea...e+on+Vitamin+d
07-20-2010, 12:13 AM   #23
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Hi Shazamataz, I just want to clarify my understanding, does your GP not want to test you for vitamin D? My specialist did my test and I was low so I had to take a pill a day for 7 days and now I just take one a month. Maybe ask your specialist for the test? Or come to the Bay of Plenty - plenty of good weather for sunbathing as well as a GI that does not think it is too expensive to order a wide range of tests.

PS: How do you insert a quote from a previous comment?
I am techno challenged at times
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07-20-2010, 12:09 PM   #24
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This is really interesting, thanks for the info guys I will have a look into doing this...or spends a bit more time in the sun!
08-14-2010, 11:38 AM   #25
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I'm on Vit D and have been for years now. Doesn't help me. Just keeps my levels where they need to be. Plus I'm a redhead and burn within 2 minutes in the sun so I tend to hibernate during the summer months.
08-14-2010, 11:48 AM   #26
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i take 10,ooo units a day, havent noticed anything except some slightly less painful bones. i have really low vit d...my level is 19 on a normal range up to 100. adequate is 60. my doctor prescribed 2k a day...i just had another test and my level went to 30..so i hope its closing in on 50 now..id like to maintain at 60!
08-14-2010, 03:44 PM   #27
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i was diagnosed with crohns 3 months after a vit d test, mylevels were very low, now i take 3000 iu daily. gi said, low level could be the reason i got crohns. it makes sense to me.
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08-21-2010, 07:23 PM   #28
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These articles don't differentiate between the 2 man types of Vitamin D. You have Vitamin D2 (Ergocalciferol) and Vitamin D3 (Cholecalciferol). The Vitamin D your body actually uses is Vitamin D3 (Cholecalciferol). With Vitamin D2 (Ergocalciferol) you have to be exposed to sunlight in order for your body to convert Vitamin D2 to Vitamin D3.

Vitamin D2 doesn't do anything unless you get some direct exposure to sunlight. How much sunlight and for how long is something I don't know. You can't overdose on Vitamin D2. You can however overdose on Vitamin D3. You shouldn't take over 1000 IU of Vitamin D3 a day unless your doctor specifically tells you otherwise.

Also what dosage of Vitamin D3 is considered to be way to much? I'm not sure what level will cause problems. I haven't been able to find a Doctor that actually knows the answer to that question. As far as I know several years ago 1000 IU of Vitamin D3 was too much. Some evidence has shown high dosages for short periods of time may help some people. But, I can't remember off the top of my head whither or not those studies were credible. So take a 1000 IU of Vitamin D3 a day. Make sure you take it with a calcium supplement or as part of a calcium supplement.
I have been hearing great things about Vitamin D3. My husband's mom is a nurse and she highly recommended it to us. Dad (in-law) was having lots of joint and muscle pain. She had their doctor test for Vit D levels and his was very low. He started taking it and felt better immediately. So, I put myself and my husband on it. Our daughter spends way more time in the sun.

Folks, I haven't been able to find side effects of this vitamin, anywhere, really. There is Hypercalcemia (sp?) but the chances of that are extremely low.

I posted a while back about having horrible joint pain - even in my hands. I was wondering about Ankylosing Spondylitis. It was BAD. Pain pills didn't help much. Nothing I did seemed to help. There were days that - well, anyway. My doctor couldn't find anything. I started thinking back about what has changed. The only thing I could remember changing was adding Vit D. So I stopped.

It was amazing! I feel so much better and it has only been a few days. Some of the joints in my hands are a still a little sore, and of course I have my normal aches and pains, but WOW! I almost don't want to go back on to make sure that was the cause. I know I need to take it again in a couple of weeks to make sure. But, I might not because I hurt that bad.

The moral of the story, I guess, is that you really have to pay attention to vitamins and other supplements. Just because they are safe and work for someone else, you may not have the same experience.
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08-24-2010, 03:19 PM   #29
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I have the same problem lots of aches and pains in my joints and muscles. I thought it was due to the fact that I had a resection and was not absorbing enough Magnesium so I started taking Magnesium this caused more diarrhea so I stopped taking it..have you been able to solve your pain problem???
08-24-2010, 05:28 PM   #30
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Welcome skytrooper!! There are two types of Magnesium. Dan Bergy, helped me out and I googled the difference. Magnesium Oxide doesnt digest as good and causes diahreah, almost a waste fo time . The best and most absorbable is Magnesium Citrate, and I found it helps with leg cramping. Also tonic water which has Quinine it is helps muscle cramps too. Hope this helps you a bit!
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