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01-25-2011, 10:28 AM   #1
Igor_Passau
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Adacolumn

The Adacolumn is an adsorptive type extracorporeal leukocyte apheresis device. The apheresis column is filled with specially designed cellulose acetate beads as the adsorptive carriers. Analyses of the blood emerging from the column have revealed that the carriers selectively adsorb granulocytes and monocytes / macrophages; lymphocytes are not significantly adsorbed. Therefore, the Adacolumn is for selective leukocyte apheresis.

Association of Granulocytes, Monocytes / Macrophages with Tissue Injury in IBDInflammatory bowel disease (IBD) like ulcerative colitis (UC) is an autoimmune disorder, patients with UC are likely to have elevated and activated granulocytes. Active UC is frequently associated with infiltration of large number of granulocytes and macrophages into the bowel mucosa. The infiltrated leukocytes can release degradative enzymes, oxygen derivatives and proinflammatory substances that can cause bowel injury and promote further inflammation. It is believed that much of the watery diarrhea seen in severe IBD is a result of injury to the absorptive epithelium, thus making these cells incapable of absorbing adequate water. These understandings have led some experts to believe that management of excess or activated granulocytes and monocytes / macrophages by apheresis should be a novel new strategy to promote remission of active UC.

This view was supported by a recent multicenter clinical trial that showed Adacolumn apheresis produced remission in a large fraction of patients with severe active UC together with a remarkable safety record. In reality, with Adacolumn apheresis, physicians achieved remission of UC that had been difficult to realize with conventional medications.
Approval of Adacolumn Medical Device in Japan

In Japan, results from the multicenter clinical trial in patients with active UC mentioned above provided the required safety and efficacy data for the approval of Adacolumn by the Japan Ministry of Health and Welfare as a medical device for the treatment of patients with active UC. Approval No 21100BZZ00687000. Hence, currently Adacolumn is available on the market throughout Japan and is being used for treating active UC.


Find Out More About Adacolumn
1. Adacolumn is a selective leukocyte apheresis device.
2. Adacolumn apheresis is very effective for active ulcerative colitis.
3. Adacolumn has an excellent safety record.
4. Adacolumn apheresis is associated with minimum burden on the patient.
5. Adacolumn apheresis improves patient’s Quality of Life and lowers medical cost.


http://www.adacolumn.com/
01-25-2011, 10:30 AM   #2
Igor_Passau
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Long-term follow-up with Granulocyte and Monocyte Apheresis re-treatment in patients with chronically active inflammatory bowel disease

Background
Patients with IBD and chronic inflammation refractory to conventional therapy often demonstrate higher risk of serious complications. Combinations of immunosuppression and biological treatment as well as surgical intervention are often used in this patient group. Hence, there is need for additional treatment options. In this observational study, focused on re-treatment and long-term results, Granulocyte/Monocyte Adsorption (GMA, Adacolumn®) treatment has been investigated to study efficacy, safety and quality of life in IBD-patients with chronic activity.
Methods
Fifteen patients with ulcerative colitis and 25 patients with Crohn's disease, both groups with chronically active inflammation refractory to conventional medication were included in this observational study. The patients received 5-10 GMA sessions, and the clinical activity was assessed at baseline, after each completed course, and at week 10 and 20 by disease activity index, endoscopy and quality of life evaluation. Relapsed patients were re-treated by GMA in this follow-up study up to 58 months.
Results
Clinical response was seen in 85% and complete remission in 65% of the patients. Ten patients in the UC-group (66%) and 16 patients in the CD-group (64%) maintained clinical and endoscopic remission for an average of 14 months. Fourteen patients who relapsed after showing initial remission were re-treated with GMA and 13 (93%) went into a second remission. Following further relapses, all of seven patients were successfully re-treated for the third time, all of three patients for the fourth time and one for a fifth time.
Conclusions

IBD-patients with chronic inflammation despite conventional therapy seem to benefit from GMA. Re-treatment of relapsing remission patients seems to be effective.

2010

http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-230X/10/73
01-25-2011, 10:33 AM   #3
Igor_Passau
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"by providing an extra 'boost' to the immune system....
This therapy not only provides the patient with a new bone marrow but also a new immune system. ...."

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/205286.php
01-29-2011, 03:02 PM   #4
Bubban
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I've had it. Quite expensive at the time(~£10,000), took roughly an hour and had one treatment per week. The only positive effect I had was that I was less tired after the treatment.
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05-31-2014, 07:08 AM   #5
Crohn2357
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Long-term follow-up with Granulocyte and Monocyte Apheresis re-treatment in patients with chronically active inflammatory bowel disease

Background
Patients with IBD and chronic inflammation refractory to conventional therapy often demonstrate higher risk of serious complications. Combinations of immunosuppression and biological treatment as well as surgical intervention are often used in this patient group. Hence, there is need for additional treatment options. In this observational study, focused on re-treatment and long-term results, Granulocyte/Monocyte Adsorption (GMA, Adacolumn®) treatment has been investigated to study efficacy, safety and quality of life in IBD-patients with chronic activity.
Methods
Fifteen patients with ulcerative colitis and 25 patients with Crohn's disease, both groups with chronically active inflammation refractory to conventional medication were included in this observational study. The patients received 5-10 GMA sessions, and the clinical activity was assessed at baseline, after each completed course, and at week 10 and 20 by disease activity index, endoscopy and quality of life evaluation. Relapsed patients were re-treated by GMA in this follow-up study up to 58 months.
Results
Clinical response was seen in 85% and complete remission in 65% of the patients. Ten patients in the UC-group (66%) and 16 patients in the CD-group (64%) maintained clinical and endoscopic remission for an average of 14 months. Fourteen patients who relapsed after showing initial remission were re-treated with GMA and 13 (93%) went into a second remission. Following further relapses, all of seven patients were successfully re-treated for the third time, all of three patients for the fourth time and one for a fifth time.
Conclusions

IBD-patients with chronic inflammation despite conventional therapy seem to benefit from GMA. Re-treatment of relapsing remission patients seems to be effective.

2010

http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-230X/10/73
Thank you.
05-31-2014, 02:21 PM   #6
Essieluv
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This is the first I've heard of this, actually. It seems pretty simple and noninvasive compared to some treatments for IBD. I will definitely be watching this one, and see if it's use and benefits progress here. Thanks for sharing.
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05-31-2014, 05:33 PM   #7
nogutsnoglory
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I never heard of it. Is it available? Still being trialed?
06-20-2014, 03:57 PM   #8
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Has anyone else tried this? Apparently it's very common in Scandinavia?
06-20-2014, 04:33 PM   #9
Essieluv
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I've never tried it, but I am very curious to hear more about it.
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