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Crohn's Disease Forum » Diet, Fitness, and Supplements » Any vegan/dairy-free/egg-free questions?


 
03-02-2011, 04:31 PM   #1
musogirl
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Any vegan/dairy-free/egg-free questions?

First of all, I'm new, so hi everyone

Thought I would try and make myself useful now that I'm here. I've noticed that some people seem to find it helpful to eat vegan foods/avoid animal products. I've been vegan myself for five years so if anyone has any questions about vegan food/cooking/products please ask and I'll try and help if I can. Can't promise to be on here every day but I will try and respond fairly regularly if anyone has any questions.

Thanks!
03-02-2011, 08:35 PM   #2
ameslouise
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Hi Muso - I'm not vegan anymore (and I was only quasi-vegan at best!) but still have a question - do you do soy products? I was really struggling when I was vegan to find good substitutes that were not soy as I try to limit soy products in my diet. I love Quorn, but if you are true vegan you probably don't eat that b/c it has egg whites.

I never did fulfill my quest to make the perfect vegan meatloaf!

- Amy
03-05-2011, 07:44 AM   #3
musogirl
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Hi Amy,

I do eat soya products sometimes, I have soya milk in tea and sometimes have tofu or occasionally veggie sausages (which are usually soya/wheat based) in meals.

I've recently rediscovered tempeh (traditional Indonesian food made from fermented soya beans) and it seems to be doing me some good, usually I can feel stuff bubbling around inside quite a lot but eating tempeh is seeming to calm it down. It's got bacterial cultures in it so I guess it works in a similar way to yoghurts/yoghurt drinks which are supposed to be good for the digestive system.
03-05-2011, 05:37 PM   #4
dreamintwilight
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My mom is from Indonesia and loves her tempeh. I love tofu but never could get used to the tempeh.
__________________
Marisa
February 2010 - diagnosed with Crohn's disease.
January 2011 - Inflammation downgraded from moderate-severe to mild with no symptoms!
January 2014 - adopted a mostly Paleo diet
May 2015 - still in remission!


Currently Taking
Humira - 40mg/week
Imuran - 125 mg/day
Calcium magnesium citrate
Fermented cod liver oil/butter blend
Culturelle probiotics
Vitamin D
Vitamin C
Biotin
Allegra
03-05-2011, 06:16 PM   #5
Ms Cordelia
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My husband and I have been vegan for 12 years. He is the one with Crohn's and a few years ago was diagnosed with a soy allergy. He has been in a constant flare for about 5 years (diagnosed with Crohn's in 2003) and can not tolerate many foods (raw veggies, leafy greens, fibrous foods, etc.) What foods do you eat when in a flare. What foods do you generally tolerate at all times? I'm stumped. Other than rice and mashed potatoes, and those just don't provide enough nutrition. He gets so anemic, i just don't know what to give him. We are vegan for ethical reasons, so meat is not really an option right now. Please send me suggestions. Thanks!!
03-06-2011, 02:28 AM   #6
Miss Spencer
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Ms Cordelia

I am following a vegan diet, but mostly avoiding things that irritate like rice, soy and wheat.

I am doing vegan to help with UC, as meat and cheese gives me terrible pain.

I seem to live on coconut water from young Thai drinking coconuts, blended ripe red papaya, blended ripe bananas, green smoothies and vegetable juices.

Plus steamed veggies – blended up if really flaring.

It is a bit like living on baby food and gets a bit boring. But it is very nutritious and makes me feel good. I don’t get pain anymore.

Perhaps you should consider some sort of nutritious superfood like certified organic freeze dried barleygrass or acai powder. You can dissolve and stir these into a glass of water or vegetable juice, and they will help to boost his nutritional levels.

Start off small, maybe half a teaspoon and increase if he tolerates it.

I was asking a naturopath about acai powder for UC, and she said it is a fantastic antioxidant that she even gives to people with stomach and bowel cancer.

I have also started taking a high quality pure grade L-glutamine supplement, as it is healing for inflammation. Many people take it for UC or C. I am starting off low and increasing as the weeks go on.

Check with a naturopath first, don’t self medicate with supplements.

My problem if you can call it that, is I look so healthy from all the smoothies, vegetable juices, nutritious superfoods and supplements, that nobody believes there is anything wrong with me. It is absolutely impossible for me to throw a sickie off work because I look too well. I am not well of course, but convincing people of that is often a challenge because people keep commenting on how super healthy my skin appears. I use to look awful and pasty greyish white when I was first diagnosed and people use to say how terrible I looked.
03-06-2011, 03:31 AM   #7
ScottS
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Hi, I read the posts, and I was very sad to see the one Ms. Cordelia wrote. I don't know why the vegan diet isn't working, but I really was hoping it would work for everyone.

I was diagnosed in 2003. First I had indeterminate colitis, then I had biopsies that indicated crohns. Then a few years later I had more biopsies and still some ulcers in my ileum area.

I quit drinking and smoking several years ago, and last year I became vegan (actually, no meat, dairy, eggs, but I eat fish). I got my first colonoscopy and upper endoscopy in 6 years last week, and I had no signs of disease anywhere. I didn't have any scarring either. Everything just looked good. I am still waiting for the biopsy results to come back, but I am thinking I may have beat this thing.

I agree that if you cannot eat certain vegetables because they aggravate the crohns or risk causing an obstruction, then start with the low fiber vegetables and work your way up. Ideally, at some point you want to get to where you are eating many fibrous foods, foods with different textures, hard things, raw things, etc., because that is what is supposed to be best for health in general: to have a mix but also have some of the tougher stuff.

When I lived in Japan, the doctor there gave me a list of vegetables to eat because they were easier to digest. They included:
Cabbage, Broccoli, Carrots, Rice, Rice pudding, lettuce, onions, and some other ones, I forget. Oh, fruits were that apples were good, bananas, and a lot of others I cant remember. What I do remember about the fruits and vegetables to avoid was that he said to avoid corn and mushrooms because they were the worst. Also said stay away from nuts.

Anyway, to get back to health and eventually possibly completely recover from this thing, I think a lifestyle overhaul is in order. No fast food, alcohol, dairy, cigarettes (the worst), no processed foods, and then you need to get exercise. However, its something to do one day at a time. It took me years to do all of the above, but I just found my way to this point over time.

Once you have Crohns, it may be correct that you can never get rid of it. But I really think you can make your health optimal by pretty much staying away from any of the things that American corporations get rich off addicting you to. Other countries that do not have these diseases don't have a lot of the nasty things that we have here as a result of our industrial, processed way of eating and doing everything. The more natural, the better. Oh, and just be careful of some of the medicines that they want to prescribe to you. For example, I am a little freaked out by pills that may make symptoms a little better but then cause leukemia (6MP) or infusions of organisms. But if your symptoms are that bad, and if these medicines do help, then by all means use them. But use common sense.

I have hope Ms. Cordelia (and anyone else for whom lifestyle change has not stopped terrible flares, etc), that with time it really will get much better. That doesnt make it any easier today, but just hang on because things do get better. Thats been my experience, and the experience of a lot of other people that have become vegan, etc.
03-06-2011, 04:16 PM   #8
musogirl
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Ms Cordelia,

I'll start by saying that I'm not a qualified dietitian or nutritionist, but here are some ideas:

Is your husband able to eat grains such as quinoa, millet or buckwheat? These are complete proteins and also good for iron and other nutrients, I think quinoa in particular is supposed to be easy to digest generally.

How about juiced vegetables? Blended soups?

If he can eat oils, then adding 'good' oils such as flax, olive or cold pressed rapeseed oil to mashed potato or other foods would add some omega 3s and vitamin E to his diet as well as extra calories.

Mashed sweet potatoes would add some vitamin A, you can do sweet potato and white potato mashed together.

If he can eat wheat, seitan is a low-fibre source of protein.

Blackstrap molasses is really good for iron and also good for calcium, you can just eat a spoonful of it or dissolve it in hot water and have it as a drink.

I completely understand that you don't want to resort to eating animal products (and from what some other people say I guess it may not help anyway). Best wishes to you and your husband.

Last edited by musogirl; 03-06-2011 at 04:35 PM.
03-06-2011, 05:08 PM   #9
Ms Cordelia
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Thanks for the input everyone. I have given him most of the foods you suggested. I will revisit them again. He's kind of a fussy eater at times (and stubborn...drives me crazy!). He also refuses to give up coffee, but quit alcohol.

We were vegan before he developed crohn's so I'm not sure what happened. I think it was triggered on his trip to Peru. When he got back he was pretty sick and never recovered. That was in 2003. He is also not on any meds right now because everything has failed. His Dr wants him to do Tysabri, but we refuse. His symptoms are not as severe lately, but he's still pretty sick. He drinks aloe juice, takes turmeric & ginger, vegan Omega 3 and liquid iron w/ b12 and vit C for absorption. He also just stated taking Aloe AMP capsules. We'll see if it works out.

Scott: I agree about the dangerous meds out there. We rather find our own solution to this disease rather than take meds that will lead to some other horrible disease. We tried LDN, but the pharm mistakenly compounded it with lactose. You can imagine how sick that made him. We will try again next week with a new batch mixed with a probiotic instead. Keeping our fingers crossed.
03-06-2011, 05:15 PM   #10
Ms Cordelia
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Again, thanks for the suggestions. I'm going to make a little list for myself as a reminder. Sometimes I get overwhelmed when he's really sick and can't think straight.
03-06-2011, 05:49 PM   #11
ScottS
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Hello, again.

I just wanted to respond to Ms. Cordelia that I still have had horrible stomach pains and incredible gas over the last several years (when I probably didn't have any crohns symptoms), and I think I have honed it down to being the two following things: the extraordinary amount of coffee that I drink every day and cruiciferous (sp?) vegetables.

I say this because you said he won't give up coffee. Well, I won't either. But now I know that when I brew incredibly concentrated, strong coffee and drink the entire container that I can expect to be bloating with gas and then passing it all like 5-10 hours later. It hurts a lot, but its actually not Crohns (as is proven by my completely clean colonoscopy / upper endoscopy).

Being a vegan, I am sure that you know the many benefits of cruciferous vegetables. They are extremely healthy. Kale, for instance, is supposed to be like the healthiest vegetable ever. They all have really strong phytochemicals that are extremely potent cancer-fighting substances.

BUT...they give you gas. And the confusing thing is that you may not get that gas that day, so you might attribute it to something else.

So I guess to sum up my points
1) consider to test whether coffee causes pain or gas or diarrhea, and if it does, your husband doesnt have to stop drinking it, but can control when the symptoms are worth it
2) make sure if you are having a lot of gas that its not due to cruciferous vegetables, and if it is, just like with #1 you can now control when the symptoms are worth eating these
3) because I have and still do feel a whole lot of pain and bloating and messed-uppedness -- even though my entire tract is clean and healthy and so are all my lab tests -- make sure to do the various medical tests and colonoscopies on a 2 - 3 year basis to make sure your symptoms are all due to Crohns.
4) I also was given Cypro and Flagyl at the beginning of the month in case I had "small bowel bacterial overgrowth" and I also felt a lot better after that.

The more time that goes by things should become clear for your husband to (whats causing what or what is better than something else). I am shocked to hear that he got Crohns as a vegan, but perhaps it isn't a disease that is caused by meat or dairy or food at all. Who knows. Maybe its antibiodics or a contagious virus coupled with genetic succeptibility. But by being vegan you are definitely helping to manage symptoms and hopefully gain some control eventually over your disease. Good luck!
03-06-2011, 05:53 PM   #12
ScottS
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PS. I live in SF too, so I'll probably one day be in the same vegan restaurant as you at the same time: Herbivore or Cafe Gratitude or somewhere, Im sure.
03-08-2011, 04:43 PM   #13
Ms Cordelia
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Scott: We love Herbivore! We were there last Saturday! Thanks for the info!!
PS. My husbands name is Scott too.
03-11-2011, 01:42 AM   #14
ScottS
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LOL. There are a lot of Scotts on the west coast for some reason.

Well, I finally got the results of the pathology, and I'm kind of mad. It's really good if you compare it to previous colonoscopies, but I was hoping I was going to be cured. Oh well. So anyway, the result was that I have mild "non-specific inflammation" everywhere except for my stomach, which was normal. In other words, if I never had a history of Crohns, this biopsy would not have been able to distinguish the inflammation as Crohns or any other specific form of colitis. Coupled with the fact that the actual pictures of my insides (and what I remembered from the procedure) looked like there was no disease anywhere, its good news. Still, I wish that it was gone, as I am investing a lot of hopes into veganism curing everything (just kidding I know it doesnt do that). I've only been vegan 1 year. Maybe by the next colonoscopy in a couple years, even the biopsies will show that everything is normal.

Back to Herbivore, by far the BEST item is their penne with lemon-herb cream sauce. It puts me into a trance, quite literally. I also like the various "chicken" sandwiches.
03-11-2011, 04:07 PM   #15
Miss Spencer
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I've been vegan myself for five years so if anyone has any questions about vegan food/cooking/products please ask and I'll try and help if I can.
Hello

Please can you or anyone else explain Seitan to me?

Can you buy it in the shops? If so where and what brands?

I have looked everywhere for it, but can't find it anywhere.

Or can you make it at home yourself? I would prefer this if the recipe is easy.

I don't understand it. I can't eat wheat / gluten products like bread, as they upset me with terrible bowel and stomach cramps.

But after eating seitan that was made to look like beef and chicken at a vegan cafe, I have fallen in love with the stuff and can't get enough of it.

The people at the cafe are Thai and don’t speak good English, so I was unable to get much information from them about the product except it was wheat / gluten based.

Thanks for any answers
03-11-2011, 09:06 PM   #16
Ms Cordelia
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Hello

Please can you or anyone else explain Seitan to me?

Can you buy it in the shops? If so where and what brands?

I have looked everywhere for it, but can't find it anywhere.

Or can you make it at home yourself? I would prefer this if the recipe is easy.

I don't understand it. I can't eat wheat / gluten products like bread, as they upset me with terrible bowel and stomach cramps.

But after eating seitan that was made to look like beef and chicken at a vegan cafe, I have fallen in love with the stuff and can't get enough of it.

The people at the cafe are Thai and don’t speak good English, so I was unable to get much information from them about the product except it was wheat / gluten based.

Thanks for any answers
Seitan is wheat gluten. You can buy it in packages at health food stores. It's usually by the tofu. Most of the time they marinate it in soy sauce in the cooking process. You can make it yourself by purchasing wheat gluten flour and boiling it. It's a bit laborious. If you are sensitive to wheat because of the gluten, I would not try to eat this stuff since it is pure gluten. But if you want to give it a try, here is a recipe a friend sent me:

Charlie's Seitan

I make seitan with a crock pot. It's not a requirement, but it does increase tenderness of the finished product. If you go with a stovetop method, reduce cooking time to 45 or 60 minutes.



Cooking Stock

2 1/2 quarts water

1 cup low sodium soy sauce
2 large carrots (1" pieces)

2 large onions (cut in quarters)

6 garlic cloves (peeled and crushed or roughly chopped)

4 bay leaves


Combine ingredients in 7 or 8 quart crock pot, set on high



Seitan

3 cups gluten flour (AKA "vital wheat gluten")

1 cup AP flour

2 cups vegetable broth

2 Tbl salt 

2 Tbl poultry seasoning or other fine-ground herbs (optional)

1/4 cup nutritional yeast (optional)



Combine broth, salt, and seasonings. Separately mix flours. Combine wet and dry ingredients in a large bowl (glass makes for easy cleanup). It's a quick go with a large spoon followed by a few moments of light kneading--the less you mix and knead, the better.

Split the now elastic dough into two or three pieces (you can pick up a little more of the flour mixture on the sticky cut sides after you split the dough). Use any left-over flour mixture to flour a surface (I like to use a piece of parchment paper).
Let dough rest on floured surface for fifteen minutes.

Gently add dough to crock pot. Simmer on low for 6 hours or leave on high for about 3 1/2 hours.

Remove from heat and slice in desired shape/thickness. Use immediately or refrigerate in strained cooking liquid for up to seven days. May also be frozen in cooking liquid for a month or so.

Good luck!
03-11-2011, 09:26 PM   #17
Ms Cordelia
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Join Date: Jul 2009
By the way, you may be able to find it in Asian markets under the name "Gluten" or "wheat meat". Some brand names are Hain & White Wave. It is high in protein (higher than tofu).
This is my favorite grain meat by far:
http://www.fieldroast.com/
If you can find it, try it. It's very savory and has a really great texture. Some of the sausages are low in fiber unlike the loafs that have lentils in them.
03-11-2011, 09:53 PM   #18
Ms Cordelia
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LOL. There are a lot of Scotts on the west coast for some reason.

Well, I finally got the results of the pathology, and I'm kind of mad. It's really good if you compare it to previous colonoscopies, but I was hoping I was going to be cured. Oh well. So anyway, the result was that I have mild "non-specific inflammation" everywhere except for my stomach, which was normal. In other words, if I never had a history of Crohns, this biopsy would not have been able to distinguish the inflammation as Crohns or any other specific form of colitis. Coupled with the fact that the actual pictures of my insides (and what I remembered from the procedure) looked like there was no disease anywhere, its good news. Still, I wish that it was gone, as I am investing a lot of hopes into veganism curing everything (just kidding I know it doesnt do that). I've only been vegan 1 year. Maybe by the next colonoscopy in a couple years, even the biopsies will show that everything is normal.

Back to Herbivore, by far the BEST item is their penne with lemon-herb cream sauce. It puts me into a trance, quite literally. I also like the various "chicken" sandwiches.
Sorry about your results. At least be comforted by the fact that it was classified as mild. And veganism may help, but is not a cure. I hope you decide to stick with it.
By the way, have you had the Chicago Style deep dish pizza at Paxtis? It's vegan and amazing!! You can request Daiya cheese and veggie sausage. Prepare to be wowed!
03-12-2011, 11:42 AM   #19
partlycloudy
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I've found this thread very informative. I have the same problem as Ms. Cordelia's hubby.


Is your husband able to eat grains such as quinoa, millet or buckwheat? These are complete proteins
Whoa, I didn't know that. I love to try new grains.
__________________
Crohn's of ileum dx'd 2008.
Imuran, 150 mg
03-12-2011, 09:34 PM   #20
Miss Spencer
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Join Date: Sep 2010
Also, if you need additional help with a vegan diet:

I suggest you join the free mailing list at: http://www.drfuhrman.com

Once you have joined the mailing list, you will be sent the following message in an email: “As a Thank You for joining our mailing list, we would like to send you a free copy of Dr. Fuhrman's Healthy Times Newsletter”.

Open that newsletter link and search for the following edition: Newsletter No 36 March 2008. It contains some excellent information on a vegan diet and supplements for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

I signed up late last year, and I am having brilliant results with his diet and supplement suggestions.

P.S. Thank you Ms Cordelia for the Seitan Recipe. I have also just found this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j7_bNpSS9xg

Looks a bit long winded.
03-13-2011, 02:06 PM   #21
musogirl
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Join Date: Mar 2011
I've not found seitan to be so readily available in shops. Wholefoods shops are more likely to stock it, but I never managed to find anything that was less than about four quid a jar.

As Ms Cordelia says you can also buy it as 'mock duck' from Chinese supermarkets, I think Holland and Barrett also sell a tinned mock duck product.

Or there's a seitan product made by Viana available from Veggiestuff (me not allowed to post links yet!) if you have Viana products in shops near you they might also have the seitan.

Vital wheat gluten doesn't seem to be available in shops here either (much to the continued annoyance of Brits wanting to try out recipes from American recipes books that use it a lot), although I've heard rumours that some of the wholefoods shops in London stock it so you might be able to find it where you are. If not, you can buy it online from Flour Bin or Low Carb Megastore (search for 'gluten powder' on both).

It's quite easy to make seitan from scratch and definitely cheaper than buying it, it also freezes well so you can make a big batch of it and defrost bits when you need it.
03-13-2011, 03:27 PM   #22
IBDCare
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Anyone tried probiotics in addition to diet?
03-13-2011, 03:34 PM   #23
IBDCare
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I cant post a URL here yet (as not posted 15 times grrr!) but if you are on Facebook I invite you to check out IBD Care there and follow the link to our website. loads of resources there including a free downloads section and a free booklet on diet in UC (and a diet and Crohn's disease on the way). All the best.

Dr Tanya Moshkovska
03-17-2011, 02:08 PM   #24
Velodrome-A-Go-Go
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I just wanted to weigh in here, too. I was diagnosed with Crohn's last summer, and have been vegan for seven years now. After about two months of symptoms, I cut wheat out of my diet and everything improved dramatically. (Before that, I was in SF and had some pasta dish at Herbivore, don't remember if it was the penne. It was super tasty, but the wheat sure did a number on me!) Vegan life without gluten is boring. I have managed to come up with eight or so solid recipes that make tofu and tempeh for every meal a little more bearable.

One thing I would caution about is using grains as a protein source. They just don't have very much. One cup of cooked quinoa, for example, has 220 calories, 40 grams of carbohydrate, and only 8 grams of protein. If everything else is upsetting to the system, it's better than starving, but a non-athletic adult needs about one gram of protein for every kilogram of body weigh. That means that 180 pound man should be eating around 80 grams of protein a day just to maintain muscle mass. It's easy to see that that's not a viable source of daily protein. Also another thing about complete proteins. There are nine (agreed upon) essential amino acids that all non-meat eaters should get during the day. They don't work synergisticly, you just need to get a balanced amount of all of them. Some are in grains and some are in beans, and some foods have both. You don't need to eat them in the same meal, even, as long as you eat a balanced diet.

Beans have about twice the amount of protein, which makes them a better source, but still not as good as seitan or tofu. I, personally, have found lentils to be the easiest legumes to digest.

When it comes to putting a diet plan together, research what foods have what. For example, if your gut is bleeding, you are probably going to have some level of anemia. Food choices can help that, but you might need to take an actual, concentrated iron pill. Get a blood test and figure out how much iron you should be getting, then figure out how much is in the foods you are already getting. Dark green veggies have some, but it might not be enough, no matter how much you eat. The information is readily available. I use Laurel's Kitchen cookbook as my reference, but you can just google it, too.

Musogirl: Where do you get your vegan omega? I was ordering some, but it was so expensive!
03-19-2011, 07:37 PM   #25
musogirl
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Hi Velodrome,

I eat flax oil and rapeseed oil for omega 3s.
03-21-2011, 03:38 AM   #26
Miss Spencer
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Join Date: Sep 2010
I use Laurel's Kitchen cookbook as my reference,
I googled it, it said it was a vegetarian cookbook?

Do you have a vegan version?

I am confused.

Also, I would love a list of ***MUST HAVE*** vegan cookbooks.

I saw these two the other day:

1) The Get Healthy, Go Vegan Cookbook

2) Incredibly Delicious - Recipes for a New Paradigm

Can anyone give feedback on these two?

If not, what is your favourite vegan cookbook?

Wheat really upsets me, so I am following a wheat-free vegan diet. Although I seem to tolerate seitan ok. Its just things like bread, pizza and pasta that cramp me up.

Also, most vegan cookbooks seem big on tofu, and I don't really like it that much.

Many thanks for any book ideas.
03-21-2011, 05:08 AM   #27
Guest
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Join Date: Oct 2007
just wanted to share my discoveries over the last few weeks, since becoming lactose intolerant.... at the beginning i didn't know what to eat, but now have a reasonably varied diet...

Lactofree (made by Arla) cream cheese and hard cheese, available in supermarkets... it's made from cow's milk but has the lactose taken out.

Plain soya milk for adding to tea, and cooking with (mashed potatoes etc..)

Coconut milk for adding to coffee (soya milk curdles in coffee)

Tiger Tiger and GranoVita mayonnaise.

Sainsbury's Free From: margarine
rich tea biscuits
chocolate brownies
jam tarts
white sliced bread
bakewell tarts
choc'n'orange bar

Tiger Tiger brown rice noodles with satay sauce

Kinneton dark chocolate

Rice Dream chocolate drink, can be microwaved to make hot chocolate

Hato (kosher) cocoa spread

these are the bought items i've found & tried, which have given me chance to eat & drink lactose free... i've also made quite a few meals (including a full roast dinner) totally lactose free, and have started including soft veggies, chicken, and eggs back into my diet. so far, so good.

just thought this info might help anyone who's struggling to find decent food on a lactose free diet...
03-21-2011, 12:21 PM   #28
Velodrome-A-Go-Go
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Dingbat- Certain soy milks will curdle in almost all coffee, but there are many brands that won't. Light roasts are more prone to cause curdling because they have more acid than dark roasts. I would also encourage exploring more whole food meal options and steer away from pre-packaged stuff as much as you can handle. Each person's guts are unique, but mine don't like the packaging. Also most Asian food doesn't have any milk in it. Thai curries or Indian dals are super easy to make at home.

Miss Spencer- Laurel's Kitchen does have recipes with egg and dairy in them. I like it because it has a lot of flavorful but wholesome recipes. Growing up in a hippy household, it was my family's Joy of Cooking. It has an appendix with lots of info on nutrition content of whole foods. I don't feel limited to using vegan-only cookbooks because eggs and dairy are so easy to replace, so long as they are not the major ingredient. What has worked for me is to not think about trying to make my favorite meals vegan, but to try lots of new foods and recipes and find new favorites. That way you aren't like "oh, this was so much better with ground beef than TVP."
As for cookbooks, I've collected quite a few over the years. Here's my two favorites:
The Veganomicon: great all-around book. Lots of recipes and guidance for being vegan. Tons of tempeh and seitan recipes. The author also has a book called something like "Vegan Brunch" with recipes for omlettes and scrambles and home fries.
The Voluptuous Vegan: for when I'm feeling gourmet. I always have to go shopping for random ingredients when I cook from this, but everything I've tried turns out superb. Lots of tofu recipes, but also lots of interesting bean recipes. Ever cook adzuki? They're fast and tasty, and high in nutrients. Plus it's got the very best chocolate cake recipe I've ever made, vegan or no!
I also cook a whole lot of Thai, Indian and Mexican food, all of which are easy to make vegan and gluten-free. I can't find any of those cookbooks, but I'm not very picky. Indian and Mexican are mostly bean-based, so no tofu.
That's cool that you can do seitan. I'm kind of jealous. I miss my fake meats.
04-04-2011, 04:04 AM   #29
bushydougie
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Location: Leeds, United Kingdom
Hi Everyone
Ive been veggie for 20 years but have recently been thinking more and more about becoming vegan. Can any of you recommend any of the soya cheese substitutes?
I love the soft cheese versions but haven't tried the hard cheese ones since I tried to cut out dairy 10 years ago (I found them awful at the time. I hope they've improved!)
Thanks for any advice
Sam
04-04-2011, 12:10 PM   #30
Velodrome-A-Go-Go
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You're lucky that you're in the UK. My favorite vegan hard cheese is called Sheese and it's made in Scotland. It's super expensive here due to taxes and stuff. They have a lot of flavors. I've only tried the cheddar and the gouda, but I like them both. The consistency isn't very accurate; they're a little too creamy, but I really like the flavor. There's another good one called Teese, but it's made in Chicago and might be super expensive if you can even find it. I like their mozzarella. For melting, Daiya is the best. It comes in grated form and is really only good for melting, but it's fabulous. Also made in the US. Follow Your Heart is okay both on sandwiches and for melting. It's not stretchy like Daiya and real cheese are, but it's the best all-arounder.
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Crohn's Disease Forum » Diet, Fitness, and Supplements » Any vegan/dairy-free/egg-free questions?
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