Share Facebook
Crohn's Disease Forum » Diet, Fitness, and Supplements » Cooking With Crohn's » Have any generic cooking questions?


 
07-25-2011, 01:18 PM   #1
vonfunk
Bourbon Bandito
 
vonfunk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Toronto, Ontario

My Support Groups:
Have any generic cooking questions?

I trained as a chef, and I know there is at least one other chef here. I figured that we should probably have a generic thread for asking questions regarding cooking or food in general.

This shouldn't be home for medical advice or "what should I eat because I'm in a flare?". Just simply I'm trying to do this, or I have this how can I prepare something with it.

SO any questions?
__________________
"Peer review or it never happened" - Oscar Wilde
Jason's colon
10/14/1980 - 06/21/2011
Goodnight Sweet Prince

07-25-2011, 01:36 PM   #2
Entchen
Chief Dandelion Picker
 
Entchen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
AWESOME.

Do you do desserts? I can't get fudge to work out. I can do other tasks with candy thermometer (candied ginger, caramel) but have *never* produced a proper fudge. Advice appreciated!
__________________
Dx: Moderate Crohn's in 3 locations
Doctor's orders: 200 mg Imuran
Have used: 4500 mg Pentasa, 4500 mg Salofalk, Flagyl, Cipro, 50 mg Prednisone, 9 mg Entocort.
Turned my Crohn's life around: ginger for nausea.
Claim to fame: "loopy and floppy" colon
07-25-2011, 02:01 PM   #3
vonfunk
Bourbon Bandito
 
vonfunk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Toronto, Ontario

My Support Groups:
I've not made fudge before, but I can try to help. What exactly is wrong with it.
07-25-2011, 03:41 PM   #4
Entchen
Chief Dandelion Picker
 
Entchen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Usually a puddle of goo, even if the thermometer says it's fine. (Hmmm...new thermometer is in order?!). Thx!
07-25-2011, 03:43 PM   #5
vonfunk
Bourbon Bandito
 
vonfunk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Toronto, Ontario

My Support Groups:
Are you using butter? And are you cooling the sugar down to 120f after you take it off the stove?
07-25-2011, 04:15 PM   #6
vonfunk
Bourbon Bandito
 
vonfunk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Toronto, Ontario

My Support Groups:
As far as donuts go, it really depends on the recipe. A denser dough would require a lower cooking temp. That would allow the middle to cook before the outside becomes burnt. You may wish to flip it more than once.
07-25-2011, 05:02 PM   #7
Cat-a-Tonic
Super Moderator
 
Cat-a-Tonic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Madison, Wisconsin

My Support Groups:
I have an extremely general question - I never really learned how to cook. My parents never cooked and they never taught me anything about cooking. I feel totally clueless in the kitchen. I learned in college how to prepare extremely simple meals (stuff like tuna salad or spaghetti) but I'm pretty much a dunce and don't know what should be very simple things. Like, do I thaw meat on the counter or in the fridge or in water or is it okay to just stick frozen food right into the oven to cook?? I swear I've heard different answers on that from different sources! Is it different for different kinds of meat?? And, what's the ratio of water to rice - I can never figure that one out and I always get very dry crunchy rice (too little water) or rice soup (too much water). I think I need a "cooking for not just dummies, but complete and total morons who are incredibly stupid" book. Help? Are there very simple cooking rules you could share?
07-25-2011, 05:55 PM   #8
vonfunk
Bourbon Bandito
 
vonfunk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Toronto, Ontario

My Support Groups:
Okay, lots to answer.

Frozen foods - Unless it was purchased frozen and the directions on the package say cook from frozen don't do it in the oven. If it is a slightly frozen chicken that's fine, but never with a large cut of meat. All methods of thawing or okay depending on how you do it. The fridge is the safest way, but the slowest. It can take a couple days. Thawing in water is good provided you periodically change the water, or do it under running water. Thawing on the counter is okay, but don't do it over night. At most it should be left out 5-6 hours (speaking from a sanitation point of view, however most guides and sanitation codes will say it is never okay). Ground meat should be thawed in the fridge.

Rice- I'm terrible at cooking proper rice. I generally follow all directions to a T, or I use instant rice.
If I am actually required to cook real plain white rice, This is the cheaters way I learned when I was still cooking in a restaurant. I wash it several times in water to remove the starch (only if it is a long grain non-sticky rice like basmati). I cook it in way too much water and periodically test it to see how cooked it is, usually starting at the 10 minute mark. Then I put it in a strainer to get rid of the excess water. There is no shame in putting rice in a strainer. If you do come across the rice soup situation, you can add a more water to the pot, stir it around and strain it. That will help remove any excess starchy water.
07-25-2011, 06:08 PM   #9
Jennifer
Adminstrator
 
Jennifer's Avatar
I made orange beef a few days ago by sort of following this recipe: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/crispy-...ef/detail.aspx

I bought 3 navel oranges and had my finance zest them all (I usually do it but he wanted to help and it was his first time and I told him to not go to far cause the rind/white part is bitter) and juiced them all. We didn't have soy sauce so I used worcestershire instead. I also had him grate the ginger root but he didn't remove most of the skin. Didn't have rice wine vinegar and used regular vinegar.

Fast forward, when the sauce was just about done I noticed it didn't look the same way it did the first time I made it by myself (I had soy sauce then and used the same amount of ginger but the skin was completely removed and used fresh oranges but don't recall how many or how much zest exactly but most likely the amount the recipe called for (didn't have enough orange flavoring and that's why I used 3 oranges this time around)) so I tasted it before adding the beef and it was the most BITTER thing I have ever tasted besides Prednisone. What happened? Was it the orange zest (do I have to do everything myself?)? Was it the skin still on the ginger root? I'd like to make it again but goodness I had to doctor that sauce up so much (strained it and added more worcestershire, salt, vinegar and sugar to kill the bitterness) just to save it.
__________________
Diagnosis: Crohn's in 1991 at age 9
Surgeries: 1 Small Bowel Resection in 1999; Central IV in 1991-92
Meds for CD: 6MP 50mg
Things I take: Tenormin 25mg (PVCs and Tachycardia), Junel, Tylenol 3, Omeprazole 20mg 2/day, Klonopin 1mg 2/day (anxiety), Restoril 15mg (insomnia), Claritin 20mg
Currently in: REMISSION Thought it was a flare but it's just scar tissue from my resection. Dealing with a stricture. Remission from my resection, 17 years and counting.
07-25-2011, 06:27 PM   #10
vonfunk
Bourbon Bandito
 
vonfunk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Toronto, Ontario

My Support Groups:
It's hard to say. It could be the zest but my guess is the worcestershire. It has a very strong and complex flavour profile. I've never used more than a couple of dashes of it. The ginger shouldn't be it. I keep mine frozen and use a fine grater, the skin tends to stay whole and in one piece.

An easy Asian style orange sauce that I use all the time is something along the lines of that recipe.
sautee the garlic and ginger, maybe a green onion or to if you have them, add a quarter cup of soy sauce, and 1-2 table spoons of marmalade, you can thin it out with more soy or some beef stock (I used the powdered instant stuff, that way i don't need to add salt and I can easily adjust the amount used). Adjust the flavour orange juice if it's on hand. I then adjust the sweetness or sourness depending on the marmalade with sugar and lemon or lime juice (or rice wine vinegar). You can strain it if you have trouble with the orange peel in marmalade, then use some corn starch mixed with water to thicken it.
07-25-2011, 07:00 PM   #11
ChefShazzy
Senior Member
 
ChefShazzy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Pointe Claire, Quebec
Cool! Just saw this thread.

I agree with what vonfunk says about frozen foods - don't put frozen food in the oven unless the packaging specifically states to cook from frozen... If you are roasting meat, the inside will remain frozen while the outside overcooks and becomes dry. Bad scene. Thawing meat under running water is quicker than thawing in the fridge, but both are acceptable methods. I don't usually recommend countertop thawing.

Re: Ratio of water to rice - depends on the kind of rice, but generally I use 1.5 parts water to 1 part rice. If I make rice on the stovetop, it usually sticks to the bottom - invest in a rice cooker, even a cheapie $10 one takes the guesswork out of rice cooking.

Re: Orange-Ginger Beef - it's gotta be the Worcestershire. I'd never use it as a sub for soy. As vonfunk, I use frozen ginger a lot and the skin gets grated as well, never had an issue.
__________________
-Sharon
_______________________________
Diagnosis: Crohn's Disease (May 2007)
Meds: Double-dose of Remicade, every 6 weeks
*I'm going to start saying I'm in REMISSION now! Three years since my last hospitalization!*
07-25-2011, 07:08 PM   #12
vonfunk
Bourbon Bandito
 
vonfunk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Toronto, Ontario

My Support Groups:
Sharon, you were the other chef I was taking about (I didn't want to put you on the spot). I only started this thread this afternoon.

I've never had the skin grate on my ginger, for me it tends to just stay in one piece, but then again that could just be how I'm grating it.

The reason I said only 5-6 hours is because generally it takes at least 2 hours for something small to thaw. and 4 hours is the limit for something to be between the temperature for 40f-140f as directed in most sanitation codes.
07-28-2011, 07:29 PM   #13
Lydia
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
I use 2 parts water to one part rice, and I dont peek under the lid until its done. If someone lifts the lid the rice turns out terrible. I dont make over 2 cups of rice at a time because it doesnt work out. I add water, rice, oil and salt to the pot, bring it to a boil, put the lid on, and turn my stove down to minimum. I leave it sit for about 20 min and its good. If I make more than 1 cup of rice I let it go for 25 min.
07-29-2011, 09:22 AM   #14
Jessica
Senior Member
 
Jessica's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: North Port, Florida
Rice- I'm terrible at cooking proper rice. I generally follow all directions to a T, or I use instant rice.
If I am actually required to cook real plain white rice, This is the cheaters way I learned when I was still cooking in a restaurant. I wash it several times in water to remove the starch (only if it is a long grain non-sticky rice like basmati). I cook it in way too much water and periodically test it to see how cooked it is, usually starting at the 10 minute mark. Then I put it in a strainer to get rid of the excess water. There is no shame in putting rice in a strainer. If you do come across the rice soup situation, you can add a more water to the pot, stir it around and strain it. That will help remove any excess starchy water.
I have NEVER been able to cook rice properly unless it's bagged 10min rice or whatever. I never thought about straining it though. Great idea, and thank you! I feel like I just stumbled upon a treasure or something. Awesome!

<3
__________________
Dx w/ Crohn's Disease May '08
Dx w/ Graves' Disease June '11
Dx w/ Lymphocytic Colitis October '12
08-01-2011, 04:54 PM   #15
scottmyster
Senior Member
 
scottmyster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
i use long grain minute rice uncle bens, if you are just cooking it for yourself , just use 1/2 cup of rice. 11/3 cup of water , 1 tsp of butter no salt. let it boil for a minute and put it on low heat for 10 minutes , most of water should be boiled off then. and leave it for about 5 to 10 minutes or more for it to absorb the rest of the water. no straining , just fluff with fork and your fine.
08-09-2011, 07:34 PM   #16
vonfunk
Bourbon Bandito
 
vonfunk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Toronto, Ontario

My Support Groups:
It's a cake donut. Yeast donuts are much lighter and chewier.
08-09-2011, 08:26 PM   #17
Trev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Wallis and Futuna

My Support Groups:
Von me old mate, where have you been? your absence has been noted.
08-09-2011, 08:30 PM   #18
vonfunk
Bourbon Bandito
 
vonfunk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Toronto, Ontario

My Support Groups:
I was in Detroit, and cancelled all of my thread subscriptions so that I wouldn't get any unnecessary e-mails on my blackberry while I was out of the country.
08-09-2011, 08:34 PM   #19
Trev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Wallis and Futuna

My Support Groups:
poor excuse, but ill except your apologies.
08-14-2011, 10:11 PM   #20
Odddlycrunchy
New Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
RICE: Agree with Lydia on every detail. Except I use 1 3/4 cups water for each cup of rice. Use coconut oil for a heavenly scent. Watch carefully until the water boils, then add the rice, cover the pot with a tight-fitting lid, turn down the burner to the lowest setting, set your timer for 20 minutes, and DO NOT OPEN THE LID for 25 minutes (keep it covered for another 5 minutes after you turn off the burner/remove the pan from the burner).

SIGH. Should say "I used...". We no longer eat rice because my entire family has gone on the SC/GAPS diet.
08-14-2011, 11:09 PM   #21
Jennjenn
Senior Member
 
Jennjenn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: New York
Thank you for starting this Jason! I am always interested in learning new things while in the kitchen! Sharon will be a big help also!
08-17-2011, 09:02 PM   #22
sawdust
Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Pennsylvania

My Support Groups:
Thanks for starting this, vonfunk.

I recently started canning and, while rewarding, it is very prep-intensive, especially for some of the tomato-based canning "recipes," like salsas and chili.

To skin tomatoes, I have been plopping one in boiling water, then into cold water, and slipping the skin off in the cold water with my fingers. Maybe I'm still not up on the fast side of things yet, but it takes about 3 minutes per tomato this way. That doesn't sound too bad, until you multiply it by 100 or so. Is this the way to go? Or is there something else you can suggest? Thanks.
08-17-2011, 09:13 PM   #23
vonfunk
Bourbon Bandito
 
vonfunk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Toronto, Ontario

My Support Groups:
That's really the only way to do. Scoring the bottom will help remove the skin if you aren't already doing it. the only way to really speed things up is to increase the size of the containers. So using a metal (not foil) roasting pan instead of a pot will allow you to do the boiling water faster, and I would suggest really cleaning the sink and using that as your ice bath. the roasting pan will take longer to bring to a boil, but the you also don't need to worry the water cooling too much as you dump in the tomatoes.

As far as scooping them out of the boiling water i would suggest using a colander with a long handle.

Another option would be to remove the stem part cutting them in half and roasting them. It will work, but the flavour of the tomatoes will change slightly, and they will cook a bit. Depending on the size of your oven and the amount of cookie sheets that you have it may take awhile to do but it will be less labour intensive. I've never done this method so you would need to experiment.

A few days ago I threw a bunch in my smoker for a few hours, they partially cooked, the skin came off easily and they got a lovely slightly smokey taste.
08-23-2011, 09:28 AM   #24
mizgarnet
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: spartanburg, South Carolina
Von and Shaz- I am getting ready to buy some new pots and pans. What is your favorite and why?

Wendy
__________________
DX'd - 1991
08-23-2011, 04:50 PM   #25
vonfunk
Bourbon Bandito
 
vonfunk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Toronto, Ontario

My Support Groups:
I don't have a preferred brand. All of my pots and pans I bought from a restaurant supply store. They are stainless steel, and not part of a set. I new what i wanted so I bought individual pieces.
3 sizes of pots with tight fitting lids, and a large frying pan. I still need a decent large non-stick pan and a small non-stick pan. Stainless steel will last for a very long time.

I don't do it professionally any more but I'm still in love with the equipment. Look for something that's heavy. Aside from a couple of pieces of non-stick I avoid buying it and I tend to stay away from things with glass lids.
08-23-2011, 04:56 PM   #26
Trev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Wallis and Futuna

My Support Groups:
hi Von, do you have a good recipe for whitebait fritters? its whitebait season here.
08-23-2011, 05:03 PM   #27
mizgarnet
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: spartanburg, South Carolina
Thanks Von! I was leaning toward the stainless steel. I am going to a supply store to buy mine.
08-25-2011, 02:43 PM   #28
xJillx
Your Story Forum Monitor
 
xJillx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Pennsylvania

My Support Groups:
Any ideas on a substitute for sherry?

I have a recipe for shrimp bisque and it calls for sherry. Sherry isn't something I usually have in, and I hate buying something I won't use again for just one recipe.
__________________
Jill

Diagnosed with Crohn's Disease - July 2010
Diagnosis of Crohn's Disease Retracted - October 2011

I am still sick and so confused...
08-25-2011, 05:19 PM   #29
ChefShazzy
Senior Member
 
ChefShazzy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Pointe Claire, Quebec
Hi Jill;
You could use a splash of dry white wine or brandy or some apple cider; How much does it call for? You could also just omit it... However, I think Trader Joe's carries a reasonably priced cooking sherry, and it keeps forever... If you have a TJ in your area, maybe check that out.
08-25-2011, 05:29 PM   #30
vonfunk
Bourbon Bandito
 
vonfunk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Toronto, Ontario

My Support Groups:
hi Von, do you have a good recipe for whitebait fritters? its whitebait season here.
I'm not sure what whitebait is, and I've never made fritters, I apologise.
Reply

Crohn's Disease Forum » Diet, Fitness, and Supplements » Cooking With Crohn's » Have any generic cooking questions?
Thread Tools


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:42 AM.
Copyright 2006-2017 Crohnsforum.com