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View Poll Results: Have you been tested for magnesium deficiency?
I have been tested and am NOT deficient 5 10.20%
I have been tested and I AM deficient 6 12.24%
I have not been tested 38 77.55%
Voters: 49. You may not vote on this poll

10-03-2011, 06:33 PM   #1
David
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Have You Been Tested for Magnesium Deficiency?

I'm curious how many of you have been tested for Magnesium deficiency? As we've found, many here are/were B12 deficient and vitamin B12 is absorbed in the terminal ileum. We've been working on a comprehensive vitamin and mineral deficiency database and found that Mg is primarly absorbed in the terminal ileum as well. What we've found so far:

Magnesium
Magnesium, a mineral that people with Crohn's Disease are commonly deficient in, is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body and is essential to good health. Approximately 50% of total body magnesium is found in bone. The other half is found predominantly inside cells of body tissues and organs. Only 1% of magnesium is found in blood, but the body works very hard to keep blood levels of magnesium constant.[1]

Magnesium is needed for more than 300 biochemical reactions in the body. It helps maintain normal muscle and nerve function, keeps heart rhythm steady, supports a healthy immune system, and keeps bones strong. Magnesium also helps regulate blood sugar levels, promotes normal blood pressure, and is known to be involved in energy metabolism and protein synthesis. There is an increased interest in the role of magnesium in preventing and managing disorders such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes.[2]

Symptoms of Magnesium Deficiency
Cold hands, soft/brittle nails, tender calf muscles, muscle cramps, shaking hands, hypertension, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, weakness, numbness, tingling, muscle contractions and cramps (Tetnus), seizures, personality changes, abnormal heart rhythms (Arrhythmias), light sensitivity, agitation, anxiety, restless leg syndrome (RLS), sleep disorders, irritability, nausea, vomiting, low blood pressure, confusion, hyperventilation, insomnia, poor nail growth, chronic fatigue syndrome, ADHD, depression, epilepsy, diabetes mellitus, tremor, Parkinsonism, arrhythmias, circulatory disturbances (stroke, cardiac infarction, arteriosclerosis), hypertension, migraine, cluster headache, cramps, neuro-vegetative disorders, abdominal pain, osteoporosis, asthma, stress dependent disorders, tinnitus, ataxia, confusion, preeclampsia, weakness.[3],[4],[5],[10]

Anatomy of Absorption
Magnesium is absorbed primarily in the distal small intestine (terminal ileum), and healthy people absorb approximately 30% to 40% of ingested magnesium.[6]

It is argued that the current reference range for magnesium is outdated and a level less than 0.9 mmol/l (2.1 mg/dL, 1.8 mEq/L) should be used to determine deficiency otherwise many people who are in fact deficient will be missed.[10] In addition, serum magnesium levels may not always determine muscle magnesium status. One study found a strong correlation in low muscle magnesium levels and muscular fatigue in individuals with resection who had normal serum levels.[11]

The health status of the digestive system and the kidneys significantly influence magnesium status. Magnesium is absorbed in the intestines and then transported through the blood to cells and tissues. Gastrointestinal disorders that impair absorption such as Crohn's disease can limit the body's ability to absorb magnesium. These disorders can deplete the body's stores of magnesium and in extreme cases may result in magnesium deficiency. Chronic or excessive vomiting and diarrhea may also result in magnesium depletion.[1][7]

In a study that compared four forms of magnesium preparations, results suggested lower bioavailability of magnesium oxide, with significantly higher and equal absorption and bioavailability of magnesium chloride and magnesium lactate.[8]

As magnesium is required for processing of potassium, low potassium levels even after supplementation may be due to magnesium deficiency.

The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2000, a U.S. national survey, found American adults who consumed less than the RDA of magnesium were 1.48 to 1.75 times more likely to have elevated CRP levels compared to those who consumed at least the RDA. This survey found that 68% of the sample consumed less than the RDA of magnesium.[9]

Recommended Daily Intake
When supplementing due to deficiency, a minimum of 600mg should be taken per day for one month and thereafter an amount that maintains blood levels above .9 mmol/l.[10]

The following chart provides daily recommended intake of Magnesium.[2]



Natural Sources of Magnesium
Spinach, beans, peas, whole/unrefined grains, halibut, almonds, cashews, soybeans, potatoes, peanut butter, brown rice, avocado, bananas, milk chocolate, raisins

References
[pos]1a[/pos][1] http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Mag...hProfessional/
[pos]2a[/pos][2] http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Mag...hProfessional/
[pos]3a[/pos][3] http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/magnesium-000313.htm
[pos]4a[/pos][4] http://www.springerlink.com/content/...795hn0/?MUD=MP
[pos]5a[/pos][5] http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch/S.../ucm245275.htm
[pos]6a[/pos][6] http://www.cmellc.com/geriatrictimes/g020208.html
[pos]7a[/pos][7] http://www.ucsfhealth.org/education/...bowel_disease/
[pos]8a[/pos][8] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11794633
[pos]9a[/pos][9] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15930481
[pos]10a[/pos][10] http://www.jacn.org/content/23/6/730S.full
[pos]11a[/pos][11] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6675185
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10-16-2011, 08:59 PM   #2
David
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Interesting little tidbit I found since doctors love to test CRP of people with IBD:

The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2000, a U.S. national survey, found American adults who consumed less than the RDA of magnesium were 1.48 to 1.75 times more likely to have elevated CRP levels compared to those who consumed at least the RDA. This survey found that 68% of the sample consumed less than the RDA of magnesium
Source
01-14-2012, 08:06 AM   #3
Rebecca85
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I specifically asked to have this done after reading your this article. I'm not deficient, but at least that's one more thing ruled out!
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01-14-2012, 09:47 AM   #4
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I havent been specifically tested, my doc says my levels are fine... but I am taking a magnesium supplement anyways. Cant hurt.
10-11-2012, 10:21 AM   #5
David
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A bump as I just updated the information in the first post and it seems rare that people are having their magnesium levels tested.

"Knowing is half the battle" - GI Joe
12-05-2012, 02:56 AM   #6
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXhUeRFE-kg

You might want check this as I really found it was true for me....blood test in NOT an accurate way of knowing you're low in mag.....also there is book called miracle of magnesium by lady who is an MD...you may want to google
12-05-2012, 07:11 AM   #7
Susan2
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I know when I am getting low on magnesium - I start getting restless legs again - so I go back onto supplementing it.

I actually can't remember whether magnesium is in the raft of blood tests my GP orders every 12 months but it's never shown up as being a problem.

Last edited by Susan2; 12-05-2012 at 08:53 AM.
12-05-2012, 11:01 AM   #8
David
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That was a fascinating video, thank you Garbanzo! I actually started supplementing magnesium again about four days ago due to eyelid twitching.
12-05-2012, 01:09 PM   #9
wildbill_52280
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#1 symptom of magnesium deficiency(my experiance and opinoin)- severe depression.

My experiances- i remember 3 months before i was diagnosed, and during this time displayed only one crohns symptom which was minor swelling/inflammation on right side of abdomen, i took a calcium magnesium pill and noticed i slept a bit better and longer, so from that observation i considered i may be either calcium of magnesium deficient. so i did some reading about teh best forms of magnesium and calcium in a vitamin supplement. i bought a calcium citrate supplement and notcied some minor improvements in physical strength, but nothing to dramatic on entire bodily function, yet when i tried a magnesium citrate supplement, my life changed dramatically, i was amazed at how much better i felt, more positive towards life and more energetic. i wouldnt be until almost a year later after i had been diagnosed, and from reading more about the existing science on how and where vitamins are absorbed in teh intestine would get a better explanation as to why the magnesium citrate would have had such a dramatic effect on my entire life experiance, when i read that magnesium seems to be absorbed at the ileum, i believe i had a very probable explanation for my experiance, and the absorptions issues were largely due to ileal and colonic inflammation, in addition to low dietary intake from high magnesium foods.

after trying a few different forms of magnesium, i have found that magnesium citrate powder is superior to magnesium oxide or magnesium glycinate chelate. I still use it everyday and probably will for life.

as far as the science of accurately checking magnesium status, well a blood test wont do it, either some osrt of retention testing or they need to check intracellular magnesium stores, which might require a tissue biopsy, testing to me seems unneccesary as there is little harm from taking a small amount of magnesium to see if you will experiance benefits from it. To be on the safe side, avoid starting out at very large doses that is all.
12-05-2012, 01:27 PM   #10
sid
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always get the symptoms like twitching eylid, shaking/cold hands, and tingling of fingers,etc. I have monitored my B12 and its perfectly fine..I still supplement it, my vitamin C intake is high throught the day. I know its not Vitamin D..so I was really confused what exactly was the problem..but now I think I know what is behind it. For many days I have been considering to start a supplement on magnesium..something like CalMagD which has all 3 vital vitamisn that I thik my body would need..calcium,magnesium and Vit D...has anyone used this ?? if yes, then is it good ?
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12-05-2012, 01:54 PM   #11
CLynn
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Ok, two possibly stupid questions on this. Back in the day of the 3 day prep for the colonscopy, I always had to drink a bottle or 2 of magnesium citrate, so I have always assumed that it works as a laxative, am I wrong? And also, if we have Crohn's in the terminal ileum and have had resections, does that make us even LESS likely to absorb than the Crohn's itself did? Or is absorbtion of things better with the resection?
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Surgeries: re-section 2004
Currently taking: B-12 injections every 2 weeks, multi vitamin/mineral, fish oil (1000 mg), D3 (5000 mg)

Also lucky enough to have psoriasis as well.
12-05-2012, 02:53 PM   #12
David
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I haven't used that, sorry Sid. Maybe someone else has some insight.

CLynn, yes, in higher doses, it can be a laxative. And terminal ileum resection greatly increases your chance for deficiency, yes. Could someone with severe inflammation but no resection have a greater chance for deficiency than someone with a short resection? Probably, but I don't know for sure.
12-05-2012, 03:13 PM   #13
CLynn
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I will check my bloodwork results, but have never been tested for it to my knowledge. I had to ask for the vitamin D3 level to be tested, so....but since I had about a foot of mine removed, am betting that I am deficient in magnesium as well, having read this.
12-05-2012, 03:23 PM   #14
SarahD
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I'm not sure if I've ever been tested for magnesium. However I wanted to add that Epsom salts contain magnesium and small amounts of magnesium can be absorbed through the skin when you have an Epsom salt bath - so this may be a good option for anyone who cannot absorb enough dietary magnesium because of either inflammation of the bowel or a resection.
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Symptoms from the age of 12. Mis-diagnosed with UC at the age of 13, and later diagnosed with Crohn's in January 2012 at 24 years old. Disease mainly in terminal ileum.


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12-06-2012, 02:56 AM   #15
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I have had so many infusions for magnesium deficiency and it never helps,I am always deficient.I also have monthly B12 shots but I am always deficient in that also.I also have Crohn's in terminal ileum with resections and colostomy(stoma).
12-06-2012, 04:39 AM   #16
sid
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dont know about magnesium..but if you ar getting B12 shots and still deficient , then may be you need to increase the frequency of the shots..and then get your self tested..and if need arise then get tested again....and acordingl increse the shot and once you get the levels to the mark..then keep taking the B12 shots accordingly..I know its so difficult..but its worth it.
12-06-2012, 11:11 AM   #17
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i might have been but never been told the result so i guess my levels are ok x
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12-07-2012, 01:36 AM   #18
David
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I'm not sure if I've ever been tested for magnesium. However I wanted to add that Epsom salts contain magnesium and small amounts of magnesium can be absorbed through the skin when you have an Epsom salt bath - so this may be a good option for anyone who cannot absorb enough dietary magnesium because of either inflammation of the bowel or a resection.
You got me curious with this statement and I did a little digging. Sure enough, you're right according to this study.

Has anyone out there experienced any positive or negative symptom changes with the regular use of epsom salts?
12-13-2012, 06:10 PM   #19
Garbanzo
 
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You got me curious with this statement and I did a little digging. Sure enough, you're right according to this study.

Has anyone out there experienced any positive or negative symptom changes with the regular use of epsom salts?
They sure make me feel super relaxed after the Epsom bath.....There are several co.'s that also market and sell topical Magnesium either as a gel or spray....I find magnesiun taurate is best oral and most likely the most expensive?

Here is topical mag on amazon http://www.amazon.com/Barbara-Hendel...=magnesium+oil
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