Share Facebook
Crohn's Disease Forum » General IBD Discussion » Crohn's Polls » Should Dr's be required to be a 'patient' as part of their training?


View Poll Results: Should doctors be a patient as part of their training?
Yes 38 76.00%
No 12 24.00%
Voters: 50. You may not vote on this poll

05-05-2006, 05:41 PM   #1
cagfire
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Trafalgar South, Victoria, Australia
Should Dr's be required to be a 'patient' as part of their training?

I swear some doctors don't know what it is like to be a patient or have some of the horrible tests done to us.

I'd like to see doctors required to spend time as a patient in a hospital to see what it's like (anonymously of course).

I'd like to see specialists have some of the tests done to them that they insist on us having.

Hands up if your doctor has ever had a barium follow through? None of mine have. What about a colonoscopy (camera up the bum)?

It would be nice to think your doctor had a REAL idea of what you were going through rather than just a theoretical idea.

I know where and what I'd like to do to some doctors....(maniacal laugh here...lol)
05-05-2006, 07:31 PM   #2
mikeyarmo
Co-Founder
 
mikeyarmo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Toronto, Ontario
This is something I had thought of before! I agree 100%. I always wondered when the doctor would come in early in the morning and wake up my roommate in the hospital if they had any idea of what it was like to be in the hospital as a patient. While it is not that big of a deal, everyday they would come in quite early in the morining and turn on my roommates light and wake him up. Whever they left they never put the light out. I know this is a small thing, but that is just a little thing a doctor should be thinking about too.
05-05-2006, 08:08 PM   #3
Jeff D.
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
^^^^
Definately, I hate when doctors do things to you that they have no clue how bad they hurt.

Maniacal laugh here

Jeff
05-05-2006, 08:23 PM   #4
Kossy
 
Here's a big problem. Doctors DO NOT have to go through ANY classes on ethics, or any sensitivty training. To be a doctor in the USA. I mean it sound strange when a firefigther/Medic, Police, Nurses have to take them but doctors don't... odd isn't it.
05-05-2006, 09:40 PM   #5
cagfire
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Trafalgar South, Victoria, Australia
Kossy said:
Here's a big problem. Doctors DO NOT have to go through ANY classes on ethics, or any sensitivty training. To be a doctor in the USA. I mean it sound strange when a firefigther/Medic, Police, Nurses have to take them but doctors don't... odd isn't it.
I don't know what doctors get trained in with regards to ethics/sensitivity etc in Australia. I find the young interns or residents are usually really great because they are still learning and haven't yet got that snot up their nose that clogs their brain so they don't have any empathy.

Doctors, not all, but a lot, tend to assume a mentality of 'we are so much more educated than you and you couldn't possibly understand what is happening...blah blah blah.'

Guess what...most patients do understand or want to!
05-08-2006, 02:13 AM   #6
marcia
Member
 
marcia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
I feel so fortunate that my GI is a very patient and wonderful doctor. My only issue with him is that he has a tendency to talk to me like I already know everything about Crohn's. I have to remind him that I am a novice at this disease and he needs to talk to me in simple terms!

Marcia
05-08-2006, 04:34 AM   #7
Mozam
 
I'm lucky that my cosultant is renowned to be one of Britains top GI people. that seems to rub off on his staff, who are all SO dedicated and hard working. His name is Doctor Williams, and I think the guy (along with ALL patient and kind medical staff) deserve a medal. It doesn't matter who he's dealing with - a youngster who has no idea what crohns or IBS is about, or an octogenarian that is equally confused because he/she has suffered no ill health ever; he is patient, informative, kind, considerate, and an absolute professional. I'm pretty sure that other people have done it, but I just wanted to air my thanks for this guy.

In answer to your question though - yeah, every doctor SHOULD have to be a patient initially. Alwasy strikes me as weird that they can give advice on something that they have NO PERSONAL FIRST HAND EXPERIENCE of.
05-08-2006, 02:45 PM   #8
cagfire
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Trafalgar South, Victoria, Australia
You raise a good point Mozam and I agree with you, my GI is a wonderful, empathic woman who I really connect with...and I have a very high opinion of her and she is always open to suggestions or willing to follow up on things I mention.

I'd still like her to have been a 'patient' as part of her training in this field.

02-02-2007, 01:07 PM   #9
Maggie-Muffin
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
hello, I think they should have to take some kind of training, so they can understand the disease better and the issuses that go along with living with Crohn's

~~~HUGS~~
02-02-2007, 02:24 PM   #10
KCMike
Senior Member
 
KCMike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Kansas
I'm sure there aren't too many GI's out there that have Crohn's. It would be really difficult to get through all those years of medical school with full blown crohn's.
02-02-2007, 03:21 PM   #11
katiesue1506
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Ok, this is completely off topic... but I went in for my usual blood test yesterday and the guy that took my blood did AMAZING... didn't hurt a bit (you know, sometimes it hurts more than others) but I was talking to him and he was like "yeah you just have to listen to the patient... some lab techs and nurses don't do that... but when it comes down to it, the patient is the one that's going to know more about themselves than I will. Like when you said which arm has the better veins, I listened, because HELL, you get blood tests almost twice a month... I'd think you'd know" I really liked that man... I think I'll request him next time.
04-28-2009, 07:29 AM   #12
SpoonNinja
Spoonie
 
SpoonNinja's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Michigan

My Support Groups:
i think this is great! my gi makes me do all sorts of tests and if i say i cant because i have something else i need to do that day he thinks im faking my symptoms which is why im stuck having tests at the hospital all day on the day of my high school graduation (june 5th) and i told him it was my graduation and he told me if i care about myself i will do this instead of graduation. its the test where you have to drink all the barium and then they push on you stomach also a few others im not sure what they are yet tho. its just going to be so fun dont you think? lol note the sarcasm
04-30-2009, 02:15 PM   #13
NatalieMT
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
I voted no, my GP is absolutely lovely, very understanding over everything - always in touch if something goes wrong or if I get admitted to hospital suddenly as has happened recently.

My gastro originally had a few communication problems but he has a really nice manner, wanted to get me diagnosed quickly but wanted me to be happy about the process and went out of his way to ge a theatre slot for me in March. After the diagnosis of Crohn's he has helped me persevere with my new medication and things are going a little better now.

I haven't been keen on any of CT, MRI, blood tests etc but I think that's just natural. Most of us would rather not be going through them but it's better to just go with it sometimes.
04-30-2009, 08:58 PM   #14
ladyB
Senior Member
 
ladyB's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
I voted yes....


...famous last words...

...'this won't hurt a bit'......

RIIIIGHT!!!
05-01-2009, 06:10 PM   #15
teeny5
Senior Member
 
teeny5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: California

My Support Groups:
I voted yes. I know it isn't realistic, but I still think the best ones are the ones who truly understand what you are going through. Personally I think my GI has no idea what to do about my Crohn's. He knows what the books tell him, but really has no idea what I am going through.
__________________
Currently on: Colazal, Prilosec, multi-vitamin, probiotics, total EFA's, glucosamine.

Previous meds: Sulfasalazine, Asacol, Rowasa, Pentasa, Entocort.


"Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience. -Ralph Waldo Emerson"
05-02-2009, 06:59 PM   #16
Colt
Senior Member
 
Colt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
I've had a few doctors as patients and they're very eager to get out, and almost always the first ones to refuse things. For example they don't get woken up at 4AM for blood draws like everyone else because they're smart enough to put a note on their door saying do not disturb until after 6AM or ask us to draw an extra tube if they think their doctor might order an additional test. I've also had 2 doctors tell me after a long stay in the hospital that it had made them sick of medical care in general and convinced them to retire.
__________________
Certified Medication Aide, Certified Nurse Aide, Phlebotomist, and Resident Cynic

Meds: Prednisone, Pentasa, Vitamin D & Calcium, Atenalol, Darvocet

Current Issues: Crohn's inflammation primarily of the upper GI (duodenum and up), Tachycardia, Osteoporosis

Current Stage of Grief: Anger
05-04-2009, 06:32 PM   #17
Procyon
Senior Member
 
Procyon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
I said no... My theory is that if a doctor can't be understanding and compassionate enough to deal with patients properly, then they should be in a lab instead of dealing with patients.

But then again, there's the Greg House type. Brilliant enough to save your life, but a total antisocial jerk.
05-04-2009, 07:14 PM   #18
Mark33180
Senior Member
 
Mark33180's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Louisiana
ladyB said:
I voted yes....


...famous last words...

...'this won't hurt a bit'......

RIIIIGHT!!!

You might feel a small pinch/prick/bit of pressure...
__________________
Better to ask forgiveness then permission.

Worrying is like a rocking chair, it gives you something to do, but it doesn't get you anywhere


Diagnosed with Crohn's 11/01 - Battling ever since
05-04-2009, 07:18 PM   #19
kello82
Senior Member
 
kello82's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Mark33180 said:
You might feel a small pinch/prick/bit of pressure...
.........says the surgeon as he rips staples out of my infected pus pocket in my belly.
(he did)
05-04-2009, 08:17 PM   #20
Mark33180
Senior Member
 
Mark33180's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Louisiana
thats when you say.... "You might feel a little pressure" and kick him in the crotch.
05-05-2009, 01:11 AM   #21
kello82
Senior Member
 
kello82's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
bahahah!!!!!

nahh i dont hate him that much.
the thought is entertaining though
Reply

Crohn's Disease Forum » General IBD Discussion » Crohn's Polls » Should Dr's be required to be a 'patient' as part of their training?
Thread Tools


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:38 PM.
Copyright 2006-2017 Crohnsforum.com