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03-15-2012, 05:20 PM   #1
meph
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Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: St. Albans, Vermont
Blood clots?

So are blood clots an extra intestinal manifestation of ulcerative cholitis? I was just diagnosed with a clot in my leg last night. I don't know if we're more susceptible to blood clots with colitis. Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.
03-15-2012, 09:14 PM   #2
GutlessWonder86
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Join Date: Jul 2010
It's a well known fact that people who have IBD are prone to blood clots when flaring. The blood tends to become "sticky" when inflammation occurs in the body. I learned this after I had my stroke 7 yrs. ago from 10 neurologists who took care of me. I had a 12" clot on my brain that almost killed me.

I have a DVT in my right leg which was just diagnosed Tues. afternoon. I have Crohn's.

there have been a few articles published regarding IBD and clots in the news and online. That is why women who have IBD are told by their GIs (if they are well informed) as well as their Gyns to avoid taking all types of hormones, especially low dose estrogen because it puts them at a higher risk for throwing clots in their legs, lungs, heart, and brain thus, causing a stroke or worse.....death.

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Here is an article I found from WebMD

Inflammatory Bowel Disease Raises Blood Clot Risk
IBD May Double Risk of Serious Blood Clots, Study Finds
By Jennifer Warner
WebMD Health News Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD
Feb. 22, 2011 -- Inflammatory bowel disease may more than double the risk of a serious blood clot in the legs or lungs, according to a new study.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an umbrella term that includes a variety of intestinal disorders, such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

Researchers found that children and adults with IBD were more than twice as likely to develop a dangerous type of blood clot that develops in the leg, known as deep vein thrombosis (DVT), or lung, called pulmonary embolism (PE).

These types of blood clots affect about two out of every 1,000 people in developed countries each year, and the risk generally increases with age.

But in this study, researchers found the results showed the relative risk of blood clots associated with IBD was particularly high among young people.

In people aged 20 and younger, the relative risk of a pulmonary embolism was six times higher among people with inflammatory bowel disease, compared to similarly aged people without IBD.

A Visual Guide to Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)
IBD Raises Clot Risk

The study compared the risk of pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis in 49,799 Danish adults and children with IBD and more than 477,000 Danish people without IBD, who were followed from 1980 to 2007.

After accounting for other factors known to increase the risk of blood clots, such as a broken bone, cancer, surgery, or pregnancy, researchers found that the risk of pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis was twice as high in people with IBD compared to people without IBD.

In a further analysis, researchers also took into account chronic medical conditions associated with an increased risk of blood clots, including heart disease, diabetes, congestive heart failure, and the use of hormone replacement therapy or antipsychotic drugs. They found that the risk of blood clots still remained up to 80% higher among people with IBD.

Researcher Michael Kappelman, MD, of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and colleagues say the results confirm previous studies that have shown that IBD increases the risk of blood clots. In addition, they suggest that inflammatory bowel disease may be an independent risk factor for blood clots that in some cases may benefit from preventive treatment.
03-15-2012, 09:25 PM   #3
GutlessWonder86
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Join Date: Jul 2010
Inflammatory Bowel Disease More Than Doubles Potentially Fatal Blood Clot Risk
22 Feb 2011

Inflammatory bowel disease more than doubles the risk of a potentially fatal blood clot in the legs or lungs (VTE), reveals research published online in the journal Gut.

Inflammatory bowel disease is an umbrella term used to include Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

Venous thromboembolism (VTE), which includes deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), and superior sagittal sinus thrombosis (SSST), affects around 2 in every 1000 people in developed countries annually.

The authors compared the number of new cases of VTE arising in just under 50,000 children and adults with inflammatory bowel disease and more than 477,000 members of the general public.

The study period spanned 1980 to 2007 and took account of known VTE risk factors, such as a broken bone, cancer, surgery and pregnancy.

The results showed that the risk of VTE was twice as high in those with inflammatory bowel disease as it was in the general public.

VTE is more common in older people, irrespective of whether they have inflammatory bowel disease or not, but the risk of VTE in patients with inflammatory bowel disease was highest in younger age groups, when compared with the general public.

In those aged 20 or younger, the likelihood of a pulmonary embolism, which can be fatal, was low, but it was six times as common among those with inflammatory bowel disease as it was among the general public in this age group.

Even after taking account of concurrent cardiovascular disease, diabetes, congestive heart failure, the use of hormone replacement therapy or antipsychotic drugs, all of which are known to heighten the likelihood of VTE, the risk still remained up to 80% higher.

The findings suggest that inflammatory bowel disease may be an independent risk factor for clot formation, say the authors.

Source
British Medical Journal
Article URL: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/217084.php

Main News Category: Crohn's / IBD

Also Appears In: GastroIntestinal / Gastroenterology, Blood / Hematology,


Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.
03-24-2012, 09:09 PM   #4
David
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Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Naples, Florida
Meph, unfortunately there is increased risk of blood clots with UC. They're not 100% sure why.

GutlessWonder, my understanding is that the "progesterone only" pill doesn't have the blood clot risk. Is that your understanding as well?
03-24-2012, 10:34 PM   #5
GutlessWonder86
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Join Date: Jul 2010
I could look into it further the next time I talk to my hematologist re: progesterone. My appointment is in April.

She is very up-to-date on IBD patients who are prone to DVTS etc.
03-24-2012, 10:36 PM   #6
David
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Location: Naples, Florida
Sounds great!
09-30-2012, 07:06 PM   #7
leslie1760
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Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Ohio
I had a clot in my vena cava below my renal veins and now am on coumadin the rest of my life due to crohns and psc and factor v leiden gene mutation
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