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Crohn's Disease Forum » Diet, Fitness, and Supplements » Fitness and Exercise » Can someone with Crohn's live a bodybuilding lifestyle?


 
04-14-2012, 12:38 PM   #1
LuisCMartins
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Lisbon, Portugal
Can someone with Crohn's live a bodybuilding lifestyle?

Having Crohn's, can I have a lifestyle like the other bodybuilders who are healthy?
More specifically, in my case, I want to gain muscle mass, and for that, I want to go on a bulking phase, which is when you take large amounts of food in order to force your body to grow. Although not counting macros, I am pretty sure I am eating more than enough, but I just don't see the scale moving up. Any thought on this? Also, I want to know if this can be unhealthy for me.

I asked about this to my doctor, and she basically told me to quit it and even stop taking protein shakes, because she said you never know what kind of stuff is in them. So, if you are ignorant like her who doesn't lift weight or is not familiarized with the bodybuilding lifestyle and want to demotivate me instead of helping me go around my disease to achieve my goals, don't even bother to respond to this thread.
04-14-2012, 02:28 PM   #2
DustyKat
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Hey Luis,

I know nothing about body building but a member that springs immediately to mind that may be able to help you out is Bobby Parker...

http://www.crohnsforum.com/member.php?u=78456

I haven't seen him around for a while but maybe you could PM him and he also has a link to his fb page.

Dusty. xxx
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04-14-2012, 02:35 PM   #3
LuisCMartins
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Lisbon, Portugal
Hey Luis,

I know nothing about body building but a member that springs immediately to mind that may be able to help you out is Bobby Parker...

http://www.crohnsforum.com/member.php?u=78456

I haven't seen him around for a while but maybe you could PM him and he also has a link to his fb page.

Dusty. xxx
I am going to contact him. Thanks!
04-14-2012, 02:38 PM   #4
DustyKat
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No worries.

Also have a look at his old posts as you will most likely get a load of info from them.

Good luck!

Dusty. xxx
04-14-2012, 02:49 PM   #5
DanHerefordshire
 
 
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I remember you asking about this a few weeks ago.. i also get very frustrated i love going to the gym but have the weight problem.. since then iv put on a stone of weight was only because of 40mg a day of prednisolone though..my metabolism must be that high these protein drinks go strait through me..well on the steroids my body seamed to absourb every last bit and more lol
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04-14-2012, 02:59 PM   #6
LuisCMartins
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Lisbon, Portugal
I remember you asking about this a few weeks ago.. i also get very frustrated i love going to the gym but have the weight problem.. since then iv put on a stone of weight was only because of 40mg a day of prednisolone though..my metabolism must be that high these protein drinks go strait through me..well on the steroids my body seamed to absourb every last bit and more lol
I feel you. I have gained a few quilos since last year, but I got them in one single week, when I started taking creatine. The moment I stop taking it, I'll go back to normal...
04-15-2012, 07:30 AM   #7
Beach
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Join Date: May 2011
It can be kind of humorous at the knee jerk reaction some physicians have to nutritional supplements. I've heard similar also.

I began lifting a couple years ago. The plan was modest in the beginning. I would be tickled pink if I could gain 10lbs of muscle I told my trainer. 30lbs of muscle later, I'm making plans to gain another 10lbs this summer. I'm not sure why I've had the success that I've had. I do not take the typical muscle lifting protein drinks and supplements. There is one vitamin that might have helped me though. I was reading the other day that in the 19th century doctors of the day found that feeding patients with consumption diseases foods high in vitamin D would cause them to gain weight. I take enough vitamin D3 to reach a testing level above 50ng/ml. Along with hard lifting, and a good diet possibly D3 has helped me greatly.

I have read that vitamin D3 boosts sex hormone levels. Possibly that plays a part.

"Vitamin D and fertility in men and women"

http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=...6&e=d37488c337
04-15-2012, 08:20 AM   #8
LuisCMartins
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Lisbon, Portugal
It can be kind of humorous at the knee jerk reaction some physicians have to nutritional supplements. I've heard similar also.

I began lifting a couple years ago. The plan was modest in the beginning. I would be tickled pink if I could gain 10lbs of muscle I told my trainer. 30lbs of muscle later, I'm making plans to gain another 10lbs this summer. I'm not sure why I've had the success that I've had. I do not take the typical muscle lifting protein drinks and supplements. There is one vitamin that might have helped me though. I was reading the other day that in the 19th century doctors of the day found that feeding patients with consumption diseases foods high in vitamin D would cause them to gain weight. I take enough vitamin D3 to reach a testing level above 50ng/ml. Along with hard lifting, and a good diet possibly D3 has helped me greatly.

I have read that vitamin D3 boosts sex hormone levels. Possibly that plays a part.

"Vitamin D and fertility in men and women"

http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=...6&e=d37488c337
That seems interesting. I'll give it a look.
04-15-2012, 09:51 AM   #9
bobby.parker
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Hey, got your message on Facebook. Will reply here as well.

In my opinion a bodybuilding lifestyle has actually benefited my health. I eat clean, unprocessed food most of the time. With low gi-carbs and a high protein intake. There's also some research going in to how a high protein diet can help crohn's.

Protein shakes are fine. I have 2 - 3 a day sometimes. The good brands have nothing funny in, and supplement your diet greatly. Also will be a lot easier on your body to digest.
04-15-2012, 10:41 AM   #10
LuisCMartins
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Lisbon, Portugal
So you eat all those slow digesting carbs? How does your intestines react to those foods full of fiber and hard to digest stuff, like oats and vegetables?
07-27-2012, 05:00 PM   #11
SmoothyCrohns
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I'm 35 and was diagnosed when I was 24. Back then I went from 165 to 129 in 4 months, took a long time to get my weight up. Six months ago I went from 155 (skinny fat) to 146 and ripped from bodybuilding. By now you know what you cant eat, stick to that. Now eat 400 too 700 calories over what your body needs to maintain your current weight. The key is foods low in carbs and sugars but high in protein. Ive been on protien shakes and creatine for a few months and can see differences, you shouldn't have problems taking supplements. I also take vit d3, super b complex, vit c, vit e, and zinc. Body feels great, looks good and only getting better, just stay away from foods you know arent healthy and that you know you cant digest correctly. One last thing, don't give up no matter what the voice in your head tells you.
07-29-2012, 02:22 AM   #12
natt
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Join Date: Jul 2012
Im 18 and there are just some things I cant eat as long as I have a balanced nutrition. Stay away from anything unhealthy and eat vegetables like candy. I have learned that some kinds of oil can help you
08-09-2012, 04:38 AM   #13
xardas
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Of course you can live a bodybuilding lifesteal with crohn, it will even help you to battle crohn. Read this: http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/mana...ns_disease.htm

For the protein shakes, you have to make sure you are not lactose intolerant. Lot of crohn sufferers are for some reason lactose intolerant. But there are many other protein shakes then only whey (milk) protein.
08-09-2012, 08:50 AM   #14
LuisCMartins
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Lisbon, Portugal
Of course you can live a bodybuilding lifesteal with crohn, it will even help you to battle crohn. Read this: http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/mana...ns_disease.htm

For the protein shakes, you have to make sure you are not lactose intolerant. Lot of crohn sufferers are for some reason lactose intolerant. But there are many other protein shakes then only whey (milk) protein.
I have never thought there would be a topic on Bodybuilding.com specific for people with Crohns disease. I'll have a look.
08-09-2012, 09:46 AM   #15
briguy
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
I did it for a couple years when I was more or less in remission. I was able to put on a good 20-25 lbs of mostly muscle. The problem I had was that later on I got sick and lost all of that muscle mass. Then when I got better I quickly gained back all the pounds but mostly as fat.

Then last winter I was able to get through a full round of p90x which caused me to drop all that weight I had been carrying around and now I can honestly say I am in the best all around shape of my life. I can run faster and jump higher than I could when I was in high school (im 32 now). For me this has been more rewarding than putting on a lot of mass.

One of the challenges I had was eating enough to sustain the p90x workout routine, especially the lean meats and protein which I feel really work my digestive system hard. Also I can't do the recovery drinks/protein shakes because I am allergic to milk and whey. I use soy milk in lieu, which is not ideal, but gets me by.

I'm planning to do the insanity workout in the fall to get ready for ski season, if only I can get my current flare-up under control...
08-31-2012, 04:46 AM   #16
onima
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Join Date: Aug 2012
Of course you can live a bodybuilding lifesteal with crohn, it will even help you to battle crohn. Read this:
For the protein shakes, you have to make sure you are not lactose intolerant. Lot of crohn sufferers are for some reason lactose intolerant.
I am interested in your last sentence. Does it also work the other way round? I mean, I have been diagnosed with lactose intolerance as a child. I am now 25 and have never ever - until a year ago - had any other digestive problems. I think this also has partly to do with CD antibodies, doesn't it? I mean, the molecular structures react to the proteins in the milk I guess. Is it possible to develop Crohn's disease after such a long time I have already lived with lactose intolerance?

Last edited by onima; 09-24-2012 at 06:28 AM.
08-31-2012, 05:33 AM   #17
LuisCMartins
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Lisbon, Portugal
I am interested in your last sentence. Does it also work the other way round? I mean, I have been diagnosed with lactose intolerance as a child. I am now 25 and have never ever - until a year ago - had any other digestive problems. Is it possible to develop Crohn's disease after such a long time I have already lived with lactose intolerance?
I think they are unrelated. Someone who has Crohn's has a high probability of being lactose intolerant, but being lactose intolerant doesn't mean you have a higher risk of having Crohn's than anyone else.
08-31-2012, 12:07 PM   #18
Cat-a-Tonic
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I agree, I think they're unrelated. I've been lactose intolerant for well over a decade, but didn't develop IBD until about 3 years ago. Now my IBD is in remission but I'm still lactose intolerant. They seem to me to be 2 separate issues.

Back on the topic of weightlifting, I'm a female so not going for a really bulky bodybuilder look, but I do lift weights 3x per week and I enjoy it. When I first hit remission, I wanted to work on making myself as healthy as possible so that my illness wouldn't be able to come back so easily. I exercise as much as I can now and I really like it, and lifting weights is my favorite (it's so much more fun than cardio!). I'm getting toned and fit - it is possible to do with IBD, although being in remission definitely helps.
09-01-2012, 11:15 AM   #19
Deliberate1
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Luis, bodybuilding is as close to my heart as Crohns is to my bowel. I lift 3 to 4 times a week and intensely, and have for more than 30 years. I am 56 now and, according to others, look 10 + years younger. It is my psych therapy, anti-depressant, anti-anxiety med and energy booster. Physiologically, it helps to reduce the bone fragility that came from years of Predisone, and helps to postpone the aging process for reasons I can not explain, but can see. I am a lawyer and quite convinced that lifting at the work end of the day allows me to put in 50+ hour work weeks.
You know, like I do, that gaining the right kind of weight can be a struggle no matter how hard you work or how much you eat. For me, it is not just CD, but genetics and, with age, the loss of testosterone. From a nutrition perspective I eat well and spread meals out five times a day. It is a way to eat more over the course of a day without the pain I generally get when I ingest too much at one time. And the body processes the food better as well. I eat high levels of protein, including at least 120mg pd from whey protein shakes, which I usually mix with milk, rough cut oatmeal, almonds and fruit. After trying more "boutique" brands, I now just get mine at GNC/RiteAid in the 5 pound containers. Remarkably good tasting and the cheapest I have found per serving.
Over time, my goals for lifting have "matured," as I have. Fitness, healthfulness, cut muscles, lifting buzz and that sense of accomplishment from a good workout have replaced the goal to be the biggest on the planet. Luis, my suggestion for you from someone who has lived with CD for more than 40 years and has lifted for more than 30 is to carefully and realistically craft your goals for lifting. Make them reasonable and achievable. And make them long-term. I have learned that genetics, as much as CD and other factors, determine what I can expect from my workouts. And I am cool with that. As you get older, and continue lifting, the value of it will become more and more apparent to you. Do not allow any frustration that you may now feel lead you to give it up or question its value. You may find, as I have, that lifting is the fountain of youth and the most powerful elixer for those of us who live with CD.
Lift on!
David
09-01-2012, 01:43 PM   #20
LuisCMartins
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Lisbon, Portugal
Luis, bodybuilding is as close to my heart as Crohns is to my bowel. I lift 3 to 4 times a week and intensely, and have for more than 30 years. I am 56 now and, according to others, look 10 + years younger. It is my psych therapy, anti-depressant, anti-anxiety med and energy booster. Physiologically, it helps to reduce the bone fragility that came from years of Predisone, and helps to postpone the aging process for reasons I can not explain, but can see. I am a lawyer and quite convinced that lifting at the work end of the day allows me to put in 50+ hour work weeks.
You know, like I do, that gaining the right kind of weight can be a struggle no matter how hard you work or how much you eat. For me, it is not just CD, but genetics and, with age, the loss of testosterone. From a nutrition perspective I eat well and spread meals out five times a day. It is a way to eat more over the course of a day without the pain I generally get when I ingest too much at one time. And the body processes the food better as well. I eat high levels of protein, including at least 120mg pd from whey protein shakes, which I usually mix with milk, rough cut oatmeal, almonds and fruit. After trying more "boutique" brands, I now just get mine at GNC/RiteAid in the 5 pound containers. Remarkably good tasting and the cheapest I have found per serving.
Over time, my goals for lifting have "matured," as I have. Fitness, healthfulness, cut muscles, lifting buzz and that sense of accomplishment from a good workout have replaced the goal to be the biggest on the planet. Luis, my suggestion for you from someone who has lived with CD for more than 40 years and has lifted for more than 30 is to carefully and realistically craft your goals for lifting. Make them reasonable and achievable. And make them long-term. I have learned that genetics, as much as CD and other factors, determine what I can expect from my workouts. And I am cool with that. As you get older, and continue lifting, the value of it will become more and more apparent to you. Do not allow any frustration that you may now feel lead you to give it up or question its value. You may find, as I have, that lifting is the fountain of youth and the most powerful elixer for those of us who live with CD.
Lift on!
David
Thank you for you thoughts. The opinion of someone with that much experience is very valuable to me, and I shall consider it in the future. I know for a fact that weightlifting is going to stay with me for the rest of my life, I just need the guidance to the most apropriate path I should take.

Also, how does your body react to those fiber dense, hard to digest foods like oats?
09-01-2012, 02:35 PM   #21
Deliberate1
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Thank you for you thoughts. The opinion of someone with that much experience is very valuable to me, and I shall consider it in the future. I know for a fact that weightlifting is going to stay with me for the rest of my life, I just need the guidance to the most apropriate path I should take.

Also, how does your body react to those fiber dense, hard to digest foods like oats?
Luis, Thanks for your kind reply. I have been most fortunate with some aspects of my CD. I have no issues digesting whatever I want - from rough cut oatmeal which I adore (with cranberries/almonds/maple syrup) to corn on the cob and all manners of raw veggies. I have had CD since I was 15 and no doc ever suggested dietary restrictions and I have observed none. Truly a variable dependant on the person and his/her gut. Personally, my triggers are mostly exernal - stress and lack of stress relief, which is where lifting comes in.
Feel free to pm if you would like to take this conversation off line.
Warm regards,
David
08-04-2014, 09:44 PM   #22
Sir Peaches
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: orlando, Florida
Having Crohn's, can I have a lifestyle like the other bodybuilders who are healthy?
More specifically, in my case, I want to gain muscle mass, and for that, I want to go on a bulking phase, which is when you take large amounts of food in order to force your body to grow. Although not counting macros, I am pretty sure I am eating more than enough, but I just don't see the scale moving up. Any thought on this? Also, I want to know if this can be unhealthy for me.

I asked about this to my doctor, and she basically told me to quit it and even stop taking protein shakes, because she said you never know what kind of stuff is in them. So, if you are ignorant like her who doesn't lift weight or is not familiarized with the bodybuilding lifestyle and want to demotivate me instead of helping me go around my disease to achieve my goals, don't even bother to respond to this thread.
hi Luis, I am 23 and was diagnosed at 4(yes that early). I have been bodybuilding since I was about 15-16 and I am also a personal trainer. I just recently had my Crohn's flare up again and after seeing the doc today and being on cimzia for one month which has been awesome until a week and half ago when I've been and still am flaring. he put me on prednisone for two weeks until I meet him again. I am close to obstruction but not yet in danger of one. he thinks if prednisone doesn't work (which even after one day it is) that I'll need lower bowel surgery. not much area to take out though, would be a small surgery apparently so I'm hoping even if I need it I'll still be able to be on a high protein diet. I was 185lbs and definitely under 10%bf. now I have lost about 20 lbs mostly muscle I have no doubt I'll gain it back once I'm in remission...but I am very afraid of losing some of my small bowel b/c then idk how much I'll be able to eat and ofcourse it could just come back. with all that said id say my condition is not severe Crohn's...it is bad no matter what though but some do have it worst! as for bodybuilding...bro it's my life; how do I stay happy in life? as long as I can lift and eat as much I need I am happy. I'm so scared now cuz the one joy has been taken. to you my friend I promise it is more than possible for u to get the body you desire; I don't want to be as big as jay cutler or Kai greene no...but I do want nice big arms/shoulders and that whole shabang! BB lifestyle is suited for us, eat good quality foods high protein and the rest tailored to your macros. it's all about eating healthy and same with Crohn's. yes you need 150-250G protein depending on weight...I don't see why that can't be done when in remission; most people are IN remission more often than they aren't; therefor we can do it! I know it's an old thread but pm me if u like; hopefully bobbyParker and Deliberate can chime in and maybe help me out too
08-05-2014, 06:09 AM   #23
LuisCMartins
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Lisbon, Portugal
hi Luis, I am 23 and was diagnosed at 4(yes that early). I have been bodybuilding since I was about 15-16 and I am also a personal trainer. I just recently had my Crohn's flare up again and after seeing the doc today and being on cimzia for one month which has been awesome until a week and half ago when I've been and still am flaring. he put me on prednisone for two weeks until I meet him again. I am close to obstruction but not yet in danger of one. he thinks if prednisone doesn't work (which even after one day it is) that I'll need lower bowel surgery. not much area to take out though, would be a small surgery apparently so I'm hoping even if I need it I'll still be able to be on a high protein diet. I was 185lbs and definitely under 10%bf. now I have lost about 20 lbs mostly muscle I have no doubt I'll gain it back once I'm in remission...but I am very afraid of losing some of my small bowel b/c then idk how much I'll be able to eat and ofcourse it could just come back. with all that said id say my condition is not severe Crohn's...it is bad no matter what though but some do have it worst! as for bodybuilding...bro it's my life; how do I stay happy in life? as long as I can lift and eat as much I need I am happy. I'm so scared now cuz the one joy has been taken. to you my friend I promise it is more than possible for u to get the body you desire; I don't want to be as big as jay cutler or Kai greene no...but I do want nice big arms/shoulders and that whole shabang! BB lifestyle is suited for us, eat good quality foods high protein and the rest tailored to your macros. it's all about eating healthy and same with Crohn's. yes you need 150-250G protein depending on weight...I don't see why that can't be done when in remission; most people are IN remission more often than they aren't; therefor we can do it! I know it's an old thread but pm me if u like; hopefully bobbyParker and Deliberate can chime in and maybe help me out too
Wow, haven't been on this website for over three years now.
In my opinion it is already a great acomplishment for you to be able to live the life of a personal trainer while having Crohn's. Props to you! We all have our ups and downs when we have this condition and I'm sure you will recover and be even better than you were before. You just have to keep fighting and stand up again right after you fall. That's just how life is, not only for us with Crohn, but for everybody.

Now an update about me. Weightlifing has been wonderfull for me. It keeps my confidence and good mood levels up and makes me feel great. I have been lifting non-stop these last three years, making the most gains during summer, when I have nothing to do and am able to lift everyday of the week and eat like a horse, and my breakdowns during college finals, when I barelly have time to eat and lift only once a week.
Overall, I made a pretty good progress, having put about 20lbs of muscle since my last visit here, and still fighting to achieve more.
It can get troublesome for my stomach in those times when I'm eating large amounts of food to gain weight, like right now for example, giving me light stomach aches and making me go to the bathroom more often than I should. But hey, if that's the price you have to to pay to live this lifestyle, I'm willing to pay it. The results are damn worth it.
08-05-2014, 08:41 AM   #24
Sir Peaches
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: orlando, Florida
thank you for replying Luis glad to see your doing well; u mind telling me what meds your on and if you have ever had an obstruction or surgery? there aren't too many chron BB which is why I restarted this thread. I'm thinking about starting a blog for Bodybuilders with Crohn's to maybe help people like us to find confidence!
08-05-2014, 08:20 PM   #25
bloke
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
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Hi Luis
Only thing I would add is that with training every day you may actually be overtraining and having your sessions being counter productive by burning off precious calories required for growth.
It is important to remember that your muscles grow outside of the gym whilst recuperating and you need to take your rest days in order for this to happen.
08-05-2014, 09:36 PM   #26
Sir Peaches
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: orlando, Florida
I agree, although overtraining means your under eating. there is no such thing as overtraining if your feeding your body enough calories and nutrients it needs. although for me I haven't lifted in 2 weeks; in turn I haven't really eaten much so no gym for me. but yes overtraining is due to lack of food, u eat more your able to train more!
08-06-2014, 05:29 AM   #27
LuisCMartins
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Lisbon, Portugal
I agree, although overtraining means your under eating. there is no such thing as overtraining if your feeding your body enough calories and nutrients it needs. although for me I haven't lifted in 2 weeks; in turn I haven't really eaten much so no gym for me. but yes overtraining is due to lack of food, u eat more your able to train more!
This. If you eat and sleep as much as your body allows you too you can train longer and harder. This is what I believe. I tried it and felt the results in my body.

As for meds, the only thing I'm taking right now is Azathioprine (Imuran, 175mg) and I have never taken a surgery.
09-01-2014, 10:25 AM   #28
stereofidelic89
 
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Hi everyone. I've been battling crowns disease since 21. I'm 24 now and i've always want to gain weight. Naturally slim and a little toned at 5"9 145lbs, I still don't feel comfortable in my skin.

Since throwing in the towel with my first gastroenterologist, working with a naturopathic has been very beneficial to abstaining from flare-ups. Here are some tips for those of you that have bodybuilding down to T, but could help keep your gut healthy.

1) Find a board certified naturopathic doctor. They can prescribe the same medicine most times as medical doctors, but they have a goal to TREAT the issue and not just MASK the problem with medicine.
2) Look into the supplement called InflaGuard. It's comprised of curcumin, boswellia and devils claw - three heavily studied herbs that are anti-inflammatory.
3) Nutrition is everything, weight lifting is less than half of the game. Get rid of non-organic produce, GMOs, antibiotic/chemically treated meats, there is a difference in health and mid-1900s-2000s people have become guinea pigs.
4) Consider eliminating food allergens entirely for two weeks. I got rid of gluten and most dairy, am doing great.
5) Through all of the drugs I hear people trying and having failed, look into LDN (Low Dose Naltrexone). There are no side effects and it has been studied, but is not overpriced or in mainstream media. Please e-mail me tjgiardi [@] coastal . -edu- if you need more information, i'd be happy to share.

My flares are something inconsistent of a typical crowns patient. I could have an incredibly painful flare that lasts for three weeks and then very quickly I get better out of nowhere. This is the pattern ever 6-9 months. So far 6-months flare free with LDN.

Gaining weight has been difficult but after seeing a nutritionist lately, I realize I can add a lot more bulk to diet and have been doing so. I will begin weight training again soon and look forward to sharing that process with everyone. Hope everyone is well.

--

BTW im not a spammer
10-06-2014, 07:54 PM   #29
onolox
 
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For the proteins after workout I use what I call "Whey yogurt SCD", I do yogurt of whey 80% to break down the lactose.
26 hrs like my normal yogurt.
Just water and whey.
11-05-2014, 02:48 PM   #30
GinnyNinjaGirl
 
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I feel you. I have gained a few quilos since last year, but I got them in one single week, when I started taking creatine. The moment I stop taking it, I'll go back to normal...
Creatine is just a puffer! It's like many wrinkle creams. Work really well as long as you use them consistently. The minute you stop? Poof! Effects disappear.

For me, now that I can (finally! ) work out again, I am back on the greens, low-fibre, high carb diet which I need to keep my energy going to sustain workouts. Plus wheatgrass shots, l-glutamine and multi's daily. The big thing for me has been eating very small amounts consistently through the day so that I can avoid hitting my system with large quantities of food at once, thereby overly stressing my digestive system.

I'm also eating higher calorie (but still small portions) meals/snacks. As for the protein powder, you can get good ones that will be safe to take. See if you can contact the account rep for the different products you would like. It really isn't hard, and you can probably request samples, then see which ones suit you better.

Important to remember that if you suffer from kidney dysfunction, protein powder is very hard on your kidneys and should be taken in moderation and perhaps under the care of a doctor who actually has some experience in sports nutrition.

This also might be a good time to just go see a sports nutritionist!
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