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03-24-2013, 11:17 PM   #91
rollinstone
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Tasty KFC like chicken - (SCD legal/delicious), free range chicken tenderloins, roll them in almond flour, cool them with butter and coconut oil in a pan until golden brown, salt to taste. Yummmmy - I wrap mine up in rice wraps and put a bit of sweet chilli on as a condiment
03-25-2013, 09:17 AM   #92
Suzysu
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Thanks! those ideas are great!!
I have been trying to totally home cook everything and cut out as many preservatives etc as possible - however my older two children in particular are refusing to eat most of what I make!! My 6 year old has no health problems but she is very skinny (naturally - lucky her!!) and I am worried about her loosing weight plus Freddy is now starting to copy them so when they say yuk at something (before even trying it!!) he follows and refuses to eat it also!! - I'm assuming that if I stick with it they will eventually accept this dietary change and start eating???? - Has anyone else had a similar experience and did the kids take to it ok in the end????
03-25-2013, 09:39 AM   #93
crohnsinct
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Ha! So btdt Suzy. It is hard but you just have to stick to your guns. Only bring in the good stuff. Keep serving what you want. I had an old doc advising me when trying to cut my 5 year old (at the time) over to veggies etc...he said, she will go hungry but only for so long then when she realizes the good food isn't going anywhere she will cave. And I'll be darned she did! He gave us lots of pointers like present dinner only when you know she is starving (not necessarily when you are hingry or when you think iit is a good time to eat). Present the rejected food first so for us it was veggies. He also said it takes about 15 consecutive exposures to a food for them to finally accept it. Also, only little bits on their plate...it is less overwhelming. No discussions. I made a deal with my daughter...I won't harp on the benefits of foods, force you to try etc but you can't make any comments either. They don't eat, just toss it. I know it goes against our very grain as moms to not feed our kids and this whole method was exhausting but it really did work. Oh yeah and for us since it was veggies we did lots of butter and garlic or cheese sauce then gradually cut back...now I have teens whole love plain steamed broccoli, green beans etc.

We still fall off the clean wagon plenty and given a choice my kids will always go unclean but they have come to accept the clean eating. Helps that there are lots of clean treats you can bake and such. Also, I surprise them from time to time with an ooey gooey totally processed unclean piece of crap meal. This way they don't feel totally deprived.
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03-25-2013, 03:51 PM   #94
Suzysu
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Ha Ha! - Thanks Crohnsinct!! - We have only really been doing it for a week (gone veggie as well) - It is slightly soul destroying but hopefully worth it in the end!! I'm not going to be totally militant about them eating stuff but at least if we can eat clean at home it's a start!!
03-25-2013, 04:57 PM   #95
crohnsinct
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I hear ya and to make matters worse you never really see a quantifiable result of your efforts. It is not like a doc years from now will say "wow good thing you went clean otherwise your kid would have gotten this that or the other thing" . I also have family members and friends who say it is a bunch of hog wash and are quick to quote any study they hear on tv or radio on a two minute piece that says it all doesn't matter. And then there are the stories of the 105 year old smoker, drinker McDonald's eater who never exercised a day in his life or the 40 year old health freak who died of a heart attack on his daily 10 mile run.

I just say, I would rather do this and find out in the end it didn't matter than not do it and find out it did matter!
03-25-2013, 05:14 PM   #96
Suzysu
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Wise wise words indeed
03-26-2013, 08:07 AM   #97
Tesscorm
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Where were you and your advice 15 years ago?!?!? Susysu, Stephen would fit right in at your dinner table!
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03-26-2013, 10:49 PM   #98
CarolinAlaska
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We love to cook clean. At first my kids balked, but whenever they'd eat junk and then felt sick afterwards, I pointed it out... see how that makes you feel when you eat ____. We had to go gluten-free, and it made it a lot easier to switch to clean eating too. Also we watch shows like "Food, Inc" and "King Corn" and they start getting the picture.
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03-27-2013, 07:47 AM   #99
crohnsinct
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15 years ago? I was right there with ya Tess!

That is why I had a third child. Another chance to do it right! I figure even baseball players get three strikes. We tell her all the time how lucky she is that I am a much more enlightened mother She had me all to herself as a young one cuz the others were in school. And how lucky for her that when O goes to college and she is entering high school I will have no other children at home to take my attention and focus off from her

She can thank me later!
03-27-2013, 08:21 AM   #100
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How lucky for her... YOU, all to herself, all through high school, nothing to distract you from her and her 'goings on'!
03-27-2013, 08:21 AM   #101
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Carole, I recently watched Food Inc.! OMG, what an eye-opener!
03-27-2013, 08:34 AM   #102
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crohnsinct - !!
Carolin what are food inc and king corn? films? documentaries?
03-27-2013, 09:07 AM   #103
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Suzysu... yes, Food Inc is a documentary film. I imagine so is King corn.

By the time my husband and I finished watching the film, we were ready to swear off anything we couldn't grow in our garden! And, we don't even have a (veggie) garden!

Just out of curiosity, how do you go about finding an organic farmer, butcher, etc.? I seriously would start purchasing my meats, produce from an organic farm but I'm not sure how to find a legitimate one and how do I know that, even if the food really is organic, that they meet appropriate hygiene/cleanliness processes? David, do you have any advice??
03-27-2013, 11:19 AM   #104
Maree.
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What you've described about watching the documentaries is how I feel sometimes when I read the main diet forum here.
03-27-2013, 06:16 PM   #105
David
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My suggestion would be to go to farmer's markets and find local, organic producers there. Then ask to tour their farm and do so.
03-27-2013, 11:09 PM   #106
CarolinAlaska
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crohnsinct - !!
Carolin what are food inc and king corn? films? documentaries?
Documentaries. You can see them through DVD rental places or online through sites like Netflix.
03-27-2013, 11:12 PM   #107
CarolinAlaska
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What you've described about watching the documentaries is how I feel sometimes when I read the main diet forum here.
Really, why? I haven't spent any time there. I do feel frustrated at times when I speak to dieticians who want my daughter to eat nasty processed foods to "fatten her up". Learn what is healthy food, and I might be able to hear you better. KWIM?
03-28-2013, 02:03 AM   #108
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I continually trip over things that make me question my assumptions about what is healthy. It really is a maze.

Saw some recent posts about grains (particularly wheat), that talked about how much they've been altered over the last 60 years by selective breeding. That suggested that even if there organic modern varieties might not be particularly suitable for human consumption.

I've swapped and reduced Liam's breakfast cereal intake but just can't picture him coping with out bread which is definitely his favorite food. I've found I can buy spelt based breakfast cereal(a medieval wheat variety that's easier to digest) but can't find heritage grain flours here.

I think my hunt for alternative flours is going to have to wait until July when we head to Georgia, in the Caucasus there is a lot of ancient grains grown and products made from these are available in regional markets and supermarkets. As there are no restrictions on importation of food here I plan to buy up several kilograms of flour and other grains products to experiment with. We love Georgia and it has the most wonderful tasting bread, but I'd not realised until I investigated heritage grains that it's because the wheat used is so different.
03-28-2013, 07:14 PM   #109
CarolinAlaska
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Sounds great, Maree. I didn't know you were moving back in July. Tell me if you find locating heritage wheat any easier to find when you actually get back.
04-02-2013, 01:31 PM   #110
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Home for us is Australia, and we try to visit each year but I don't see my husband finding work back there anytime soon. We've been away for half Liam's life.

Georgia, is a small country in the Caucasus - former Soviet Republic (only a couple of hours flight from us). It's part of the area where wheat grew wild and was first domesticated.

Georgia is extremely poor, but has beautiful scenery, lovely people and gorgeous food, one of our favorite places. We are taking my uncle and aunt there for a week in July at the end of a tour there doing through eastern europe. So I'll take the opportunity to try and find a good source of Einkorn wheat flour given it turns out it's one of the main places it's grown.
04-02-2013, 01:37 PM   #111
crohnsinct
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Georgia, is a small country in the Caucasus - former Soviet Republic (only a couple of hours flight from us). It's part of the area where wheat grew wild and was first domesticated.

Georgia is extremely poor, but has beautiful scenery, lovely people and gorgeous food, one of our favorite places. We are taking my uncle and aunt there for a week in July at the end of a tour there doing through eastern europe.
Take me! Take me! We can call it a fresh air fund trip...you know...where they take the nasty city people and expose them to the beautiful countryside...ask FW...I am a nasty city girl and in desperately need of such a trip.
04-02-2013, 10:11 PM   #112
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You'd love it at immigration they give your passport a cursory glance, stamp it then say welcome to Georgia and hand you a bottle of wine.

Last edited by Maree.; 04-02-2013 at 10:11 PM. Reason: Fixing word selection error
04-03-2013, 07:42 AM   #113
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Having tried every health food shop in town, popped into the local supermarket today and they had spelt wheat flour. Last place I would have thought to look, I often go there to pick up a few things as it's just around the corner but not to do a full shop as it's really little and has limited range.

So tomorrow I'm going to make a sour dough starter, then on Saturday morning I'll bake my first set of spelt loaves, to use for the kids sandwiches this week (school week here starts Sunday).

A friend has offerred to lend me a bread maker and if I decide to make all my own bread I'll probably try that, as although I really enjoy making bread by hand it's a bit time consuming to do all the time.
04-03-2013, 07:59 AM   #114
crohnsinct
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YUM! Let us know how it turns out and share te recipe!
04-06-2013, 10:37 AM   #115
CarolinAlaska
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Home for us is Australia, and we try to visit each year but I don't see my husband finding work back there anytime soon. We've been away for half Liam's life.

Georgia, is a small country in the Caucasus - former Soviet Republic (only a couple of hours flight from us). It's part of the area where wheat grew wild and was first domesticated.

Georgia is extremely poor, but has beautiful scenery, lovely people and gorgeous food, one of our favorite places. We are taking my uncle and aunt there for a week in July at the end of a tour there doing through eastern europe. So I'll take the opportunity to try and find a good source of Einkorn wheat flour given it turns out it's one of the main places it's grown.
Boy! I was sure confused. I thought you were moving back to the state Georgia in the US! Thanks for the clarification. That is really cool you are going to the country Georgia and that you'll likely have access to the good wheat! Will you be able to get it home in ample supplies? So, you'll stay where you are long-term or are you planning a more permanent move? Just trying to get it straight in my head .
04-06-2013, 11:03 AM   #116
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There are 4 of us. On the outbound flight we'll have 3 cases of less than ~20 kg each. Then coming back we can get upto 40kg per person in checked baggage. 20kg cost $13 per person 40kg cost $40 per person. I think I'll buy a cheap 4th bag while we are there and pay for an extra bag for purchases.

We are total nomads we go where ever my husbands current job is. We had 2 years in Saudi Arabia and now 3 in Emirates. Would love to go to Sth East Asia (our long term goal but job market there is soft at present.) So think at the moment another year here looks likely.

My husband does IT consulting and is away 80 - 90 % of the time which I find hugely frustrating. He's basically based here because there is a lot of work in the Middle East and Dubai has a super connector airport. Next week he is in Saudia Arabia then 3 weeks in Ghana. Home for a week to handle visa renewals then 3 weeks in Saudi followed by a month in Lebanon. With projects in London & Oman also on the cards for the next 6 months. The boys and I struggle to keep up with his travel plans.

This summer where planning to travel with him as much as we can as he's been away so much this year that I think boys need to spend more time with him around.
04-06-2013, 11:12 AM   #117
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Maree: I grew up with a dad who travelled the same but when he was home (which was rare) he was 100% home and present with us kids (no computers back then). We also travelled all summer with him and the adventures we had and the exposure to his business (he was in sports and news trelevision) was invaluable.

My hubby also travelled quite a lot when my kids were young. It was hard but I have to say the hardest part was living alone with the kids, I got into a routine, set all the rules etc. Then he would come home and muck it all up! Had his own idea of the rules, screwed up our schedule etc. He quickly got the hint that though.
04-06-2013, 11:13 AM   #118
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That sounds rough. Where is your favorite place to live? How are the people there where you are?
04-06-2013, 11:23 AM   #119
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Mobile phones are awful. Particularly with global teams there is no such thing as a weekend or out of hours. In this region Saudi Arabia & Oman have Thurs/Fri weekends. Here our weekend is Fri & Sat and in most of the rest of the world its Sat/Sun. He has collegues and customers working every day of the week who ring with questions of looking for advice. Then add time zones, Pete's supervisor is in London and work hours there run until about 11pm our time and his line manager somewhere in the US so team calls are always late night.

This is why when planning family holidays I actively seek out remote destinations with no mobile signal.

Totally agree about the disruption part. Life here with the boys tends to be really busy but we get into the swing of our routine and then things go haywire when we've got an extra person to incorporate into our schedule.
04-06-2013, 12:18 PM   #120
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I love Australia, Melbourne our home town is still our favorite city anywhere. But I also love to travel and explore new locations.

Dubai is 90% expatriate and the expatriate community is very diverse. It's a travel and trade hub. The groups I'm most involved with is my school community, which I really enjoy because it's really diverse. Some nationalities have their own schools. My boys are in an IB school (International Bacclaluret school). It has 1660 kids from over 100 nationalities and it's very unusual to have more than 2 or 3 kids of the same nationality in a class. French and Russian are the two languages most commonly spoken at home, followed by Arabic and English I'm on the PTA and run the support programs for non english speaking parents which means I have contact with a range of fascinating people from a vary diverse set of places.
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