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Crohn's Disease Forum » Diet, Fitness, and Supplements » You may want to avoid those french fries and potato chips


 
06-16-2012, 06:32 PM   #1
David
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You may want to avoid those french fries and potato chips

This study showcases that glycoalkaloids, the harmful component of the top 1.5mm of potatoes are concentrated in fried potatoes. Yes, the study uses an animal model, but it has been known for awhile that glycoalkaloids can cause problems.

In addition, IBD happens to be the most prevalent in countries that consume the most fried potatoes.

I hope this helps someone

If you'll pardon me, I'm going to go have a tantrum regarding the fact I need to avoid fried potatoes
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06-16-2012, 06:50 PM   #2
AlliRuns
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This is interesting as the area that I come from has a high prevalence of Crohn's, and potatoes, especially of the fried variety are a dietary staple.
06-16-2012, 06:52 PM   #3
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Are oven cooked chips fine then I hope
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06-16-2012, 06:55 PM   #4
David
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Are oven cooked chips fine then I hope
As far as I can tell, it's all about the glycoalkaloids. These are concentrated in the skin and top 1.5mm of the potato. Frying potatoes concentrates them but based upon what I'm reading, you may want to avoid any potato products as they very likely don't take off that top 1.5mm even if they peel them. Why risk consuming something shown to increase intestinal permeability and various inflammatory factors knows to be associated with IBD?
06-16-2012, 06:57 PM   #5
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Oh right so all those green potatoes ive been eating are actually bad, like everyones telling me
06-16-2012, 07:03 PM   #6
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Hmm, peeling them will remove (for most potatoes) 60-95% of glycoalkaloids. 95% sounds good, but 60% sure doesn't.

Oh right so all those green potatoes ive been eating are actually bad, like everyones telling me
Extremely. Read the link in this post.
06-16-2012, 07:29 PM   #7
Irene3
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This study showcases that glycoalkaloids, the harmful component of the top 1.5mm of potatoes are concentrated in fried potatoes. Yes, the study uses an animal model, but it has been known for awhile that glycoalkaloids can cause problems.

In addition, IBD happens to be the most prevalent in countries that consume the most fried potatoes.

I hope this helps someone

If you'll pardon me, I'm going to go have a tantrum regarding the fact I need to avoid fried potatoes
Awww, potatoes as well??? It's not enough that every food group besides veg, even fruit, can possibly make crohns worse, and some say it's this or that food group, but now all sorts of veg too. You can't even say ahhh well, I'll go on a liquid diet until I get well, as then you have lactose to worry about, or you simply don't get enough nutrient. :/
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06-16-2012, 07:30 PM   #8
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Wow, this is frightening considering that I'm on TPN and the only solids that I seem to tolerate are potato chips. Thanks for bringing this to our attention!
06-16-2012, 07:34 PM   #9
David
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I went on vacation for five days and was feeling pretty good. I went to a yoga retreat with all healthy food. I came back and was excited to see that my potato plants were ready for harvest. I always harvest them when the potatoes are small because they seem much more flavorful to me. The last couple days I have been a mess.

It turns out that small, immature potatoes have concentrated amounts of glycoalkaloids.

06-16-2012, 08:04 PM   #10
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D'oh. So even the smaller potatoes that you "don't have to peel" aren't good. Man, I've been looking forward to a nice "southern breakfast" with fried potatoes. David, thanks for posting this though.
06-16-2012, 08:05 PM   #11
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D'oh. So even the smaller potatoes that you "don't have to peel" aren't good.
They appear to be the worst.

06-16-2012, 09:10 PM   #12
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I'm guessing that sweet potatoes are in on this too....

06-16-2012, 09:11 PM   #13
David
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Sweet potatoes don't have glycoalkaloids

06-16-2012, 09:13 PM   #14
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Yay!
06-16-2012, 09:15 PM   #15
David
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For the record, tomatoes DO have glycoalkaloids but in much lower amounts. I'm not sure how much though, I'm still researching that one.
06-16-2012, 10:57 PM   #16
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And saponins - legumes and soy
"The results indicate that some saponins readily increase the permeability of the small intestinal mucosal cells, thereby inhibiting active nutrient transport, and facilitating the uptake of materials to which the gut would normally be impermeable"
http://ukpmc.ac.uk/abstract/MED/3794...Aj9IUyayfwLm.0

and lectins, - legumes, grain,
"These observations suggest that lectins can affect both the ultrastructure and the permeability of the intestine, in a way assumed to mimic allergic reactions to food constituents."
http://content.karger.com/ProdukteDB...oduktNr=245960

intestinal permeability, think -stress, sugar, grain, legumes (inc. peanuts), nightshades, NSAIDs (like aspirin, ibuprofen, and nabumetone), antibiotics and ALL processed foods (apparently)

"Specifically, intestinal TJs may exert a pathogenetic [Capable of causing disease] role in intestinal (inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease) and extraintestinal diseases (diabetes type 1, food allergies, autoimmune diseases)."
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3241743/

"There is growing evidence that increased intestinal permeability plays a pathogenic role in various autoimmune diseases including CD and T1D. Therefore, we hypothesize that besides genetic and environmental factors, loss of intestinal barrier function is necessary to develop autoimmunity. In this review, each of these components will be briefly reviewed."
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...037.x/abstract

Sounds like paleo to me

interestingly, i'm having a mini flare after digging into my sons hot chips in a moment of weakness, although it's just as likely it was the (GM?) processed vegetable oil.

Last edited by hugh; 06-23-2012 at 09:55 PM.
06-16-2012, 11:25 PM   #17
nogutsnoglory
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I always thought potatoes were safe for digestion. Low fiber smooth on the way down. I never heard of this term? How I find out how much of it is in other foods?
06-17-2012, 07:53 AM   #18
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Well, mashed potatoes are my ultimate comfort food... guess I will mash sweet potatoes or cauliflower instead....I just have to figure out how to get my cauliflower smooth and creamy!

When I eat low starch veggies, fruit, and free range, grass feed, wild caught proteins - I feel so much better. I do enjoy crackers made with Quinoa, brown rice flour, and flax seeds occassionally.

Have a great Sunday!
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06-17-2012, 09:18 AM   #19
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David, if the potatoes are peeled are okay to eat? Or is it all potatoes, that are fried?
Thank you for all your info.....
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06-17-2012, 09:42 AM   #20
David
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Linda,

Peeling helps but the glycoalkaloids are in the top 1.5mm of potato. In addition, some potato varieties have higher glycoalkaloid content than others and in the higher ones, even peeling may not help much. If you feel that potatoes aren't a good idea for you, I'd personally avoid them completely. That's what I'm going to do. If you feel you do fine with them, then peel and enjoy
06-17-2012, 10:03 AM   #21
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Well, mashed potatoes are my ultimate comfort food... guess I will mash sweet potatoes or cauliflower instead....I just have to figure out how to get my cauliflower smooth and creamy!

When I eat low starch veggies, fruit, and free range, grass feed, wild caught proteins - I feel so much better. I do enjoy crackers made with Quinoa, brown rice flour, and flax seeds occassionally.

Have a great Sunday!
I like celariac steamed and mashed with sweet potato or cauliflower (or potatoes, because I seem to be able to cope with them all right.)
06-17-2012, 10:41 AM   #22
lseibert
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Thanks David, I think I will stick to sweet potatoes.....
06-17-2012, 02:46 PM   #23
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Thanks for the advice David and bringing this informartion to our attention
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06-18-2012, 04:15 PM   #24
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David, do you perchance have a link showing that sweet potatoes don't have glycoalkaloids? I think we talked about this in another thread awhile back - I had mentioned that my aunt (related by marriage, not blood) has Crohn's, and she went to the health food store and was asking a guy who worked there about potatoes and Crohn's - he said she should avoid ALL potatoes and that she should eat parsnips instead. So if sweet potatoes are indeed okay, that would be great, because I'm not a big parsnip eater (and I don't think my aunt is either).
06-18-2012, 05:23 PM   #25
David
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Sweet potatoes are in a different family from potatoes. This article discusses some of the negatives of both types of potato.

Now, I'm not saying sweet potatoes should be consumed by people with IBD, that's up to the individual. If memory serves, the Specific Carbohydrate Diet says no to them, but they don't contain glycoalkaloids.
06-18-2012, 10:50 PM   #26
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http://www.foodsafetywatch.com/public/154.cfm

The above acticle talks about glycoalkaloids.
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06-18-2012, 11:18 PM   #27
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But, but... red potatoes! And potato skins... Awwh man.
06-19-2012, 01:09 AM   #28
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What if I make my own chips (fries) and peel the potatoes twice, thus removing at least the top 1.5 mm. Should that be OK? Mashed and jacket (baked) potatoes are among my safest foods
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06-20-2012, 08:01 PM   #29
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Was going to make mashed potatoes but skipped out on it after reading this. Anyways supposed to be on a liquid diet so I shouldn't cheat.
06-22-2012, 08:12 PM   #30
norma123
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I guess I won't be peeling potatoes anymore
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Crohn's Disease Forum » Diet, Fitness, and Supplements » You may want to avoid those french fries and potato chips
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