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Crohn's Disease Forum » Books, Multimedia, Research & News » Breast Milk Therapies for Adults


06-21-2012, 01:53 AM   #1
Igor_Passau
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Breast Milk Therapies for Adults

CD14 A cell surface protein abundant in human milk, is present when the immune system learns to fight pathogens in the intestines. Nestlé researchers think the protein could turn out to help adult patients suffering from the immune responses that cause Crohn’s disease.
Lactoferrin A human-milk protein that binds iron, helps the body fight Shigella, Salmonella, E. coli, and other microbes that feed on iron. A supplement called Lactoferrin Gold 1.8, marketed by Nikken in Japan, is made from the milk of transgenic cows manipulated to have a human lactoferrin gene. The current process for producing lactoferrin is so inefficient that it requires nearly a gallon of cow’s milk to create just one capsule of the stuff. Yet the treatment may be worth it for the most vulnerable. Already shown to work in pigs, whose immune systems are much like ours, lactoferrin could provide a boost for those with compromised immune systems such as infants, the elderly, and the chronically ill.
Lysozyme An enzyme found in low levels in human milk, has been shown to kill E. coli in mice and pigs; it could soon find medical applications. To boost production of the enzyme in animals, U.C. Davis scientists have transferred the human gene for the enzyme into dairy goats. Although regulations prevent the transgenic milk product from being sold, the researchers are working with the Brazilian government to test it in the northeastern part of the country, where childhood diarrhea is common and some areas have infant mortality rates up to 10 percent.

http://discovermagazine.com/2012/jun...er+Magazine%29
06-21-2012, 04:29 AM   #2
Dazzafarr
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This sounds like the colostrum thing.
Colostrum made me I'll so I stopped having it.
But it has an idea there!
I think they should focus on other pathogens as well as MAP and they might find a closer relation than they think.
06-28-2012, 07:10 PM   #3
CrohnsCHES
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I have heard of breast milk being used for other therapies related to cell healing and reduction of inflammation, and it's used sometimes for burn victims and cancer patients. I haven't heard of any other applications for Crohn's, but it sounds like an interesting therapy to try! One of the benefits of breast milk for babies is that it helps them develop the GI tract, so there is definitely potential as far as I can see! Only problem is it's very pricey, and not easy to get unless you don't go through an actual milk bank, in which case it's very hard to know what you are actually getting!
06-28-2012, 08:42 PM   #4
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This sounds like the colostrum thing.
Colostrum made me I'll so I stopped having it.
But it has an idea there!
I think they should focus on other pathogens as well as MAP and they might find a closer relation than they think.
Off topic:

I had a discussion with a GI about MAP, and Crohn's. I had asked him if I could have the MAP bacteria. He told me that if I did, I would have tested positive on the TB test I took before starting Humira.
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06-29-2012, 08:48 AM   #5
kiny
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Off topic:

I had a discussion with a GI about MAP, and Crohn's. I had asked him if I could have the MAP bacteria. He told me that if I did, I would have tested positive on the TB test I took before starting Humira.
He must not understand what MAP is or simply misunderstood you. paratuberculosis is not the same pathogen as tuberculosis.

MAP = Mycobacterium Avium subspecies Paratuberculosis

If it was that simple there wouldn't be different tests for MAP and TB, they're 2 different things. Testing for TB tells you nothing about MAP, testing for TB is a lot simpler than a MAP test, which takes culturing and PCR. A TB test tends to just involve looking at someone's skin the next day to see if there was a reaction.

They have some similarities, and some antibiotics for TB are used against MAP, but they're still completely different bacteria.

*they're both intracellular
*both are able to hide inside macrophages, which is where many assume the increased TNF-alpha comes from, MAP is able to exploit our immune system, they multiply inside a macrophage and they have developed very complex ways to steal iron from the body to survive
*both are slow growing bacteria, they multiply very slowly, which makes them hard to detect and kill

Last edited by kiny; 06-29-2012 at 09:22 AM.
06-29-2012, 08:53 AM   #6
kiny
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One of the benefits of breast milk for babies is that it helps them develop the GI tract, so there is definitely potential as far as I can see!
There are studies that show that babies who went off breastmilk and onto bottled milk early on have a higher chance of developing crohn. Those first years as a baby seem to have a huge impact on our immune system.

Last edited by kiny; 06-29-2012 at 09:31 AM.
07-02-2012, 01:41 AM   #7
Slim Johnson
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There are studies that show that babies who went off breastmilk and onto bottled milk early on have a higher chance of developing crohn. Those first years as a baby seem to have a huge impact on our immune system.
Well, I am going to sleep better at night knowing this..

My wife stopped breastfeeding after less than 2 months, with my twins.


07-02-2012, 01:45 AM   #8
Slim Johnson
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He must not understand what MAP is or simply misunderstood you. paratuberculosis is not the same pathogen as tuberculosis.

MAP = Mycobacterium Avium subspecies Paratuberculosis

If it was that simple there wouldn't be different tests for MAP and TB, they're 2 different things. Testing for TB tells you nothing about MAP, testing for TB is a lot simpler than a MAP test, which takes culturing and PCR. A TB test tends to just involve looking at someone's skin the next day to see if there was a reaction.

They have some similarities, and some antibiotics for TB are used against MAP, but they're still completely different bacteria.

*they're both intracellular
*both are able to hide inside macrophages, which is where many assume the increased TNF-alpha comes from, MAP is able to exploit our immune system, they multiply inside a macrophage and they have developed very complex ways to steal iron from the body to survive
*both are slow growing bacteria, they multiply very slowly, which makes them hard to detect and kill
There was no misunderstanding. That is what he told me. I had asked him specifically, since MAP may be transferred through milk, and I used to be a big milk drinker. I also asked him about Johne's disease specifically.
07-03-2012, 04:56 PM   #9
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Of course, it would be counter productive if the breast milk contained MAP. If MAP can be transferred through cows milk, it could/would also pass transfer through breast milk (if the person providing the milk had been exposed to MAP). I don't know when (if ever) MAP will be irrefutabley (sp?) linked to IBD, but I'm amazed that no agency, body, etc., has called for Johnes infested livestock to be kept totally out of the food chain. Mad cow disease!!! Everybody panics. Johnes disease???? Whazzat. Who could it harm? Just ignore it...
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07-04-2012, 05:37 AM   #10
kiny
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Of course, it would be counter productive if the breast milk contained MAP. If MAP can be transferred through cows milk, it could/would also pass transfer through breast milk (if the person providing the milk had been exposed to MAP). I don't know when (if ever) MAP will be irrefutabley (sp?) linked to IBD, but I'm amazed that no agency, body, etc., has called for Johnes infested livestock to be kept totally out of the food chain. Mad cow disease!!! Everybody panics. Johnes disease???? Whazzat. Who could it harm? Just ignore it...
Yeah. Cows with Johne's disease are being culled daily, some countries do no want to trade lifestock if it has animals with Johne's disease (The Netherlands has a very strict policy), some countries don't care at all. You will never see a government or farmer openly talk about Johne's disease, it's linked to Crohn and Type 2 Diabetes, once either is proven without a doubt, no one will want to drink milk anymore, it would mean huge economic losses for farmers, millions of cows would need to be killed. It's so widespread that it's not longer just in farm animals and monkeys, it has transferred to house pets now, when they checked dogs and cats who were sick, they found they had MAP.

Animals they found it in who got sick so far: cows, goats, buffalos, monkeys, dogs, cats, and a few others.

The idea that humans are invulnerable to this bacteria is ridiculous, of course we're getting sick from it, we're not invulnerable to this.
07-05-2012, 10:35 PM   #11
Slim Johnson
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Kiny, I agree with what you are saying, and I also find it ridiculous that nobody wants to talk about MAP, and the plausible link to Crohn's.
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