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View Poll Results: Is lettuce a trigger food for you?
Yes, it is 32 50.79%
No, it is not 18 28.57%
I'm not sure 13 20.63%
Voters: 63. You may not vote on this poll

 
09-02-2012, 09:48 PM   #1
David
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Is lettuce a trigger food for you?

It seems that lettuce is a trigger food for many here. Is it for you? And has anyone pondered WHY lettuce might be so problematic for so many (if it indeed is)?
09-02-2012, 09:56 PM   #2
mickey
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A Chinese doc informed me that I should stir fry the lettuce and any other vegetables, if in a flare up. A thought for some as it apparently changes the food and does not cause negative effect when heated through.
09-02-2012, 10:28 PM   #3
nogutsnoglory
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Cooking does break down fibers but lettuce is supposed to be low fiber.
09-02-2012, 11:13 PM   #4
EthanPSU
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Nope, I love Cesar salads and have never experienced a prob earring them
09-02-2012, 11:29 PM   #5
Chimpur
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It seems to have upset me in my last flare up and I'm scared to try it again.
09-03-2012, 08:10 AM   #6
emmaaaargh
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My godmother's the only other person I know personally with CD and she can't touch any lettuce at all. I've never noticed a problem, though.
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09-03-2012, 10:05 AM   #7
Twiggy930
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My son is ok with lettuce on a sandwich but I have not tried him on a salad since diagnosis.
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Also taking: TuZen probiotic and following a low FODMAP diet (not very strictly).

Past Treatments: Prednisone, Flagyl, Cipro, Pentasa, exclusive EN via NG tube (6 weeks), Prevacid, Iberogast (20 drops twice a day) and high doses of vitamin B2.
09-03-2012, 10:17 AM   #8
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I have issues if I eat a lot of raw veggies and fruit. It seems the healthier I try to eat the worse the Crohns is.
09-03-2012, 12:41 PM   #9
naen
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I agree with ddevanie - everything I try and eat that is healthy seems to make me feel worse. I have been told to try a low residue diet - which basically is good for crohns but not a healthy option. Its so difficult to manage.
09-03-2012, 01:27 PM   #10
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I dont Eat any FIBRE at all none , I learnt that if it is under 5gs its ok .. I only eat flesh of tomatoes and pears , but take a compound supplement every day
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09-03-2012, 06:39 PM   #11
Rachel
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I have found that dark green lettuce upsets me more than iceberg.
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Diagnosed September 2011
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09-03-2012, 07:18 PM   #12
NiceCupOfTea
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I don't think lettuce is triggering as such for me, but it can be very indigestible, especially the frizzy stuff - most of it ends up in the toilet.
09-03-2012, 08:05 PM   #13
Ckt
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Weirdly, iceberg lettuce used to cause me quite a bit of pain..now it's ok! You have to love crohns..it's like a moving target!
09-16-2012, 12:44 PM   #14
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Fresh fruit and veggies tend to give me gas pain if I eat to much either all at once or to many times in a week. Small amounts are usually ok but like a cup of tea most lettuce and tomato ends up in the toilet.
09-16-2012, 02:11 PM   #15
rygon
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I never ea a lot of it, but if im flaring already it does play up my insides. When ok I find a bit doesnt make much difference
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09-16-2012, 02:42 PM   #16
Terriernut
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Lettuce can cause me some problems. Anything difficult to 'break down' and my bowel makes me pay! I'd KILL for a big salad!
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09-16-2012, 07:44 PM   #17
ellie
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I'm a fairly cautious with lettuce - a bit of shredded iceberg is ok on a chicken salad sandwich ( no seeds in the cucumber, but tomato ok)
Certainly a big bowl of that dark leafy mesclun mix - like a Thai beef salad etc, would -> D. Baby English spinach seems a bit gentler as a substitute green
In general I stir fry or par boil veges lightly, rather than eating them raw.

HD
09-16-2012, 08:55 PM   #18
Mark74
 
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When I am in a flare I can't do any lettuce or raw vegatables. When I am not in a flare I can usually get by with eating a salad every now and then. Especially if it is a few days after my humaria. I won't eat lettuce or raw vegatables a few days before it is time for humaria wearing off.
09-17-2012, 10:08 AM   #19
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not aware that it is a trigger food, but since having symptoms and then being diagnosed with Crohns, have noticed that its not digested well...
09-17-2012, 10:52 AM   #20
CLynn
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I seem to find with me, iceburg will tear me up, it is mostly water. But the darker green lettuces and greens agree with me more, and are healthier for us.
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09-17-2012, 12:20 PM   #21
mf15
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Lettuce/spinach/beets and many others are loaded with nitrate.Especially non organic or hydroponic,higher yet.
The nitrate converts to nitrite,then converts to NO.
If I take arginine a NO doner I get worse.
Excess nitrite and sulfite may interfere with butyrate transport.
I will post info in the research and news section.
I have UC.

Old Mike
09-17-2012, 02:19 PM   #22
David
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Mike,

My research has taken me there as well. This is an amazing read if you haven't seen it.

Guess who has the highest intake of these nitrates - Europeans - North america wasn't tallied, too bad.

I've always wondered why people with IBD have SO MUCH trouble with salads. Maybe this is why:


Source

And you know all that hydroponic lettuce bring grown in hot houses these days? The nitrate levels of those are off the charts.

Oh my:
stool and plasma nitrate + nitrite concentrations were significantly higher in children with inflammatory bowel disease compared with levels in control children
Source

Corticosteroids inhibit nitric oxide.

Remicade lowers nitric oxide levels.

So does Azathioprine - they say 6-MP doesn't but then there's this.

And here's a tidbit for low dose naltrexone.
09-17-2012, 02:41 PM   #23
CLynn
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I am amazed that tomato is in the low category...most of us don't digest it well at all. I still LOVE tomatos, homegrown in the summer, but my, I pay for it.
09-17-2012, 02:42 PM   #24
mf15
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Good article on the peroxynitrate. They talk about arginine,it makes me worse.
I believe that the use of nitrogen fertilizers starting 1913 with the Haber process,making cheap nitrogen fertilizer is resulting in excessive nitrate consumption. IBD in the usa started to increase sometime in the 1920's we have to continue to look at history to figure out what is going on. One reason they might not be able to figure out IBD is that most eat the same foods,even if vegan,I have been trying to figue out for years why some vegetarians get IBD,high nitrate may be one of them. There is no reason for me to believe that our bodies can handle this excessive nitrate load.
Old Mike
09-17-2012, 02:43 PM   #25
Terriernut
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Wow. Every single one on the lower end doesnt bother me much. The items on the high and very high...oh dear, cant even smell them without getting ill!
09-17-2012, 02:47 PM   #26
David
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I'm a permaculture farmer.

Wanna know what happens to a plant that gets too much nitrogen?

They get fertilizer burn where the plant becomes dessicated as a result of osmotic stress. Then the bugs eat it. Unless of course you pour pesticides on it.

Bugs tend to leave healthy plants alone, especially when there are plenty of good predatory bugs around due to there being habitat for them and the farmer doesn't kill them with pesticides.

I think something similar happens in humans with IBD. We kill tons of our good bugs, we don't create a good habitat for our immune system/good bugs, and then cause a sort of fertilizer burn of our tissues and the bad bugs invade.
09-17-2012, 02:54 PM   #27
CLynn
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So I need a pesticide on me to keep the bugs off?
09-17-2012, 02:57 PM   #28
David
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The pesticide (Cipro/Flagyl) often works, but it kills the good bugs too. Some bugs always survive though, and over time can become resistant to your pesticides. Your remicade, LDN, thiopurines, etc stop the fertilizer burn but you're still ingesting that fertilizer.

What we want to do is create a permaculture farm in the human body. Mother nature is much smarter than we are. No fertilizer, no pesticide, no row crops, no monoculture, plenty of sunlight, all the micronutrients, all the macronutrients, and everything working together in a beneficial manner to achieve homeostasis.
09-17-2012, 03:19 PM   #29
CLynn
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Agreed! Humans trying to be smarter gets us into these medical messes.
09-17-2012, 09:35 PM   #30
pieman
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This thread is a prime example of how a little knowledge can be dangerous.
It is actually well intentioned, but nonetheless alarmist. Most people today live in a profound reality that requires far more rigorous analysis, rather than purely 'intelligent speculation.'

Some basic facts:

The ingestion of foods containing nitrates raises plasma levels (levels in the blood) of nitrogen compounds. Nitrite particles are extremely important in antimicrobial activity, and vasoregulation, as well as in many other normal (and vital) physiological functions. Whether or not an excess of some of these compounds (which are normally excreted harmlessly via urine) is detrimental or otherwise, is not yet known. Speculation is, as always, rife amongst the amateur pseudo-scientific population . However, the facts do not support alarm at this stage. The relationship to IBD is even more tenuous (a very long bow to draw.)

efsa.europa.eu/en/scdocs/doc/689.pdf
ajcn.nutrition.org/content/90/1/11.full

The increased levels of nitrogen compounds found in the stool of IBD patients has nothing at all to do with the consumption of nitrogen containing foods. Those increases are found as a result of the inflammatory processes involved in IBD (induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines). Colonic nitrogen compounds are produced by intestinal epithelial cells. They are not present due to ingestion of nitrogen containing foods.

NO (nitrogen monoxide) production is considered to be essential in gut homeostasis and to have a protective role during intestinal inflammation.
Whether or not other synthesized isoforms are in any way detrimental, is the subject of recent research, and not yet conclusive one way or the other.

Extreme caution should be undertaken in making wild claims, such as the analogy of 'fertilizer burn'.

Whilst there is a natural compulsion (particularly for some middle class Americans) to indulge in discussions about; every kind of food and its deleterious effects on the the human body, grass fed cattle, and organic fruit and vegetables, it is a misnomer for the real world population and purely speculative in nature. Research must be more thorough, before wild claims and half truths are spread (however well-intentioned they may be.)

An example of ideology versus reality:

There is no longer enough surface area on the planet for the kind of food production we once enjoyed. The population is now too large. For example, grass fed cattle need a minimum of 2.5 acres each in order to feed. This rises to over 100 acres in poorer quality land. The surface area of the USA is simply not great enough to support this type of farming if all people in the USA were to eat purely grass fed animals. The rest of the world has land far less arable, and far more densely populated, and therefore even less able to be farmed this way.
The real discussion ought to be about population control (and alternative farming processes) but no-one wants to talk about that as it is an uncomfortable subject. Why do people think intensive farming and genetic engineering have been undertaken? It is the extreme population growth that necessitated this kind of work.
So we have indulgent ideology about grass fed animals and organic crops led by the privileged few. And we have the relentless demonizing of foods in the manner seen on this thread (and in many others) as it supports the wonderfully naive agenda, which we all wish was a viable one and a cure-all for IBD.
God help the majority of the world's population, who have to eat in the real world conditions of today. And god help the poor malnourished and underweight Crohnies who have to deal with all this non-science, whilst battling to maintain their caloric intake and well-being. Take greater care before making non-science claims.

Peace and love.
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