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Crohn's Disease Forum » Treatment » Enteral Nutrition & TPN » Trace minerals in enteral nutrition


10-03-2012, 12:25 AM   #1
David
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Trace minerals in enteral nutrition

A good paper.

In short, in addition to all the usual vitamins, get your zinc and selenium levels tested while on enteral nutrition. Especially since people with Crohn's disease are commonly deficient in them anyway.

Naturally different formulations of enteral nutrition will have different levels of the micronutrients but this article showcases they aren't perfect and deficiency can still transpire so monitoring is important.

Do not blindly supplement selenium or zinc them as they can lead to toxicity.
10-03-2012, 12:30 AM   #2
Gianni
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Copper as well!
10-03-2012, 12:33 AM   #3
David
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I'm just not sure about copper yet as the data for people with Crohn's is conflicting and that paper only had one who was deficient in it. In fact, one study found people with Crohn's had HIGHER levels than controls. If I had Crohn's I'd get it tested though. Of course, I'd get every vitamin and mineral tested But most will have a hard time getting doctors/insurance to do that so until I have more data on copper, I'm not comfortable suggesting it and only want to press for the vitamins/minerals which I know people are commonly deficient in.
10-03-2012, 01:05 AM   #4
Gianni
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I was deficient in copper, zinc, Vitamin D, Iron. That's the only reason i suggest it I get them all tested anyways
10-03-2012, 01:06 AM   #5
David
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Ah, very interesting. Do you supplement copper? I wonder if the copper deficiency played a role in your iron deficiency.
10-03-2012, 01:11 AM   #6
Gianni
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I did initially for about a month before i read the dangers of too much copper. Now I just make sure i incorporate plenty of green vegetables as they are great sources of copper as well as the mineral molybdenum which will help manage copper levels so they don't go too high
10-03-2012, 01:13 AM   #7
David
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I believe that's where some of our health issues come from. As a farmer, I know the difficulty of insuring that my crops have sufficient trace minerals. I know damn well that many mass produced crops out there are deficient in these trace minerals. And don't get me started on the hydroponic stuff.
10-03-2012, 01:20 AM   #8
Gianni
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Yup, plants are deficient and in turn we are. I believe we have had this convo before haha. I can't say that i've looked into hydroponics much but i am aware of it, I'm guessing you are not a fan.
10-30-2012, 05:57 PM   #9
Mark in Seattle
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David, what are some of the ways that a farmer, such as yourself or someone farming on a smaller level such as in their backyard, could try to attain the best soil quality with minerals and so forth? Does composting help with that?
10-30-2012, 10:20 PM   #10
David
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Heheh, oh man. You've opened up a can of worms when it comes to getting trace minerals in the soil! Getting trace minerals into my soil is an ongoing effort for me and one I am very much still learning about and experimenting with. I'm as fascinated with it as I am vitamins and minerals for people as I think it's absolutely critical for plant and human health.

The funny thing is, the first step is to do what you do if you're human and suspect mineral or vitamin deficiency. You get tested! Just as it's a bad idea to blindly supplement vitamins and minerals for humans, it's a bad idea for the soil as well. So you take soil samples to your county extension office and let them test them for you. Once you have a readout, then you can properly supplement. And of course, just like with humans, there's good ways to supplement and bad ways. I personally am working to supplement in the most natural ways I can. These include:

1. HIGHLY diluted seawater.
2. Rock dust and diverse rocks applied all over the place.
3. I let a large chain rust in water and dilute the rusty water in watering cans for iron.
4. I bury small metal objects near trees to let them rust for iron.
5. Kelp
6. Fish emulsion
7. Diluted urine.
8. Compost.
9. Various mulches.
10. Use of dynamic nutrient accumulators and chop and drop.
11. Molasses

Those are the big ones I utilize at present and are coming to mind. I'm happy to elaborate on any you want.
10-30-2012, 11:25 PM   #11
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Do you feel like these methods are creating healthier plants David?
10-30-2012, 11:35 PM   #12
David
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I would say that most of the plants are healthier but I still have a LOT to learn and implement. I've only been here a year and started basically with sand that is/was highly devoid of nutrients. And part of the problem is, just like in people, it's much more intricate than just having enough of the right vitamins and minerals. In people, everything from enzymes to bacteria need to be present to help ensure proper utilization of the vitamins and minerals. Same goes for plants. I need to get the soil bacteria and fungi good and healthy so there can be that symbiotic relationship with the plants. And I have to create habitat for beneficial insects, animals, and other organisms to help the plants as well. They need to have proper hydration. The pH needs to be correct for that particular plant. They need to be free from stresses. And and and...

Just as with people, creating a healthy, sustainable environment for plants is more than just popping a pill. It's a total 180 from pretty much everything we've been taught. I love permaculture as it works to let nature do its thing with just a little help from us as the caregiver. I'm applying the same methodology to my disease treatment as well. I'm working to get my body's ecosystem in homeostasis so it can be sustainable without "pesticides" and "herbicides" if you will.
10-30-2012, 11:43 PM   #13
Gianni
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Yup it is definitely an intricate process that takes a long time to create and a very short time to destroy


I'm working to get my body's ecosystem in homeostasis so it can be sustainable without "pesticides" and "herbicides" if you will.
Love it!
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