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Crohn's Disease Forum » Books, Multimedia, Research & News » The Fungus-Yeast Connection


 
02-02-2013, 09:54 AM   #31
Beach
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Thanks for the Epstein Barr mention and treatment regime! That could be worth an experiment in the future.

Different idea, but along the lines of the main theme of fungus and yeast connection, the ARA fatty acid mention I thought interesting in light of the controversy over an article concerning a mouse study this week. It was brought up that possibly omega 3 oils, along with omega 6 fatty acids could negatively influence our gut flora.

Over the years I've tended to avoid omega 6 oils, believing an excess of them negative for health. I thought though that fish oil helped my GI issues. Possibly that is not the case.

"Of mice and men: Experts challenge omega-6, omega-3 mouse gut health study"

Leading omega-3 experts have challenged results of a study with mice that found that a diet rich in omega-6 fatty acids may disrupt gut microbiota, and that supplemental fish oil may make things worse.
http://www.nutraingredients-usa.com/...t-health-study
02-02-2013, 10:16 AM   #32
723crossroads
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Well, now I don't know what to do. I've been taking them for 20 yrs. and my heart is very healthy!
02-02-2013, 10:53 AM   #33
Beach
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Yeah, it certainly can be confusing with all the contradictory information out there.

Wanted to mention, I was told my heart was healthy also at one time. I ate well due to the gut, and did what I could to exercise. Cholesterol tests always came back fantastic. Overall I received good health marks for heart health.

Well, one day a friend was telling me about heart CT scans. A traveling scanner came to his place of work. CT scans are able to detect calcium plaque growth in arteries, which is the very best indication of cardiac risk.

So I knew this was something my aging parents were concerned about, heart health. I called a neighboring cities hospital to sign up for a heart scan. We decided to make a day of it with the family, as I drove us all over to the facility. Thankfully, my parents tested out great - which then brought about many jokes on long life and delayed inheritance for me. I didn't plan to have a CT heart scanning done. At the time I was only 36, younger then a typical scan is done. Figured though since I was there, the facility nurse said she had time, and the CT scanner was lower radiation than a typical, it didn't hurt that the facility was having a sale at the time costing around $150 per scan, I would have a plaque detection done too. And wouldn't you know, lucky me, I had high plaque growth. I figure my IBD contributed to my coronary plaque development. Now I not only watch my gut health, but need to be careful about heart health too. Thankfully the two prevention methods tend to overlap - other than possibly this recent fish oil mention. Figure I'll keep taking the fish oil. Not sure if it helps the heart, as the cholesterol theory seems to be loosing some favor of late, but lower triglycerides probably does not hurt.
02-02-2013, 11:03 AM   #34
723crossroads
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Yeah, it certainly can be confusing with all the contradictory information out there.

Wanted to mention, I was told my heart was healthy also at one time. I ate well due to the gut, and did what I could to exercise. Cholesterol tests always came back fantastic. Overall I received good health marks for heart health.

Well, one day a friend was telling me about heart CT scans. A traveling scanner came to his place of work. CT scans are able to detect calcium plaque growth in arteries, which is the very best indication of cardiac risk.

So I knew this was something my aging parents were concerned about, heart health. I called a neighboring cities hospital to sign up for a heart scan. We decided to make a day of it with the family, as I drove us all over to the facility. Thankfully, my parents tested out great - which then brought about many jokes on long life and delayed inheritance for me. I didn't plan to have a CT heart scanning done. At the time I was only 36, younger then a typical scan is done. Figured though since I was there, the facility nurse said she had time, and the CT scanner was lower radiation than a typical, it didn't hurt that the facility was having a sale at the time costing around $150 per scan, I would have a plaque detection done too. And wouldn't you know, lucky me, I had high plaque growth. I figure my IBD contributed to my coronary plaque development. Now I not only watch my gut health, but need to be careful about heart health too. Thankfully the two prevention methods tend to overlap - other than possibly this recent fish oil mention. Figure I'll keep taking the fish oil. Not sure if it helps the heart, as the cholesterol theory seems to be loosing some favor of late, but lower triglycerides probably does not hurt.
I had a heart cath. done because of chestpains and mine was totally plaqyefree. Which surprised them and me. I am overweight, but always ate good foods.
02-02-2013, 11:16 AM   #35
Beach
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You're lucky, not for the chest pains obviously, but not having plaque!

Fingers crossed on my part. I've was told I was at a 5% risk of a cardiac per year - if I didn't take preventive measures.
02-02-2013, 12:30 PM   #36
723crossroads
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You're lucky, not for the chest pains obviously, but not having plaque!

Fingers crossed on my part. I've was told I was at a 5% risk of a cardiac per year - if I didn't take preventive measures.
Stick with xtra-virgin olive oil and heart healthy foods. You can eat alot of good foods that are still heart healthy. Avacado's if you like guacamoli is really good for your heart. Also pnut butter and whole grains. Beef is even ok once a week if it is lean. Sad thing is I can't get away with raw veg anymore. I used to have that as a snack at night with light ranch dressing watered down with skim milk.
02-02-2013, 01:14 PM   #37
Beach
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Thanks. I've been following cardiologist Dr. Davis's Track Your Plaque dietary plan for keeping plaque from rupturing. He's been having success with patients and followers at preventing heart attacks.

Another plan that looks interesting is Dr. Agatston. He is the author of South Beach diet and has done a good amount of work with plaque scoring. Both low carb plans, avoiding whole grains, are somewhat similar. He reports few heart attacks with patients also.

"Heart Disease Prevention and Reversal"

http://www.trackyourplaque.com/
02-02-2013, 05:09 PM   #38
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Different idea, but along the lines of the main theme of fungus and yeast connection, the ARA fatty acid mention I thought interesting in light of the controversy over an article concerning a mouse study this week. It was brought up that possibly omega 3 oils, along with omega 6 fatty acids could negatively influence our gut flora.

Over the years I've tended to avoid omega 6 oils, believing an excess of them negative for health. I thought though that fish oil helped my GI issues. Possibly that is not the case.
Thank you for the reference. Here is another link with a little more information on the study.

https://news.ok.ubc.ca/2013/01/23/fi...t-health-risk/

However, the results really don’t surprise me. Raymond Peat, Ph.D. has long contended that excessive polyunsaturated oils from any source can be harmful. He says that a little polyunsaturated oil in the diet isn’t going to hurt you. What you need to do is keep the ratio of polyunsaturated to saturated fat low. You also have to be careful in the young not to restrict polyunsaturated oils too much. We really don’t know what that would do to their development. He also contends that when you restrict polyunsaturated oils, you need to increase your vitamin and mineral consumption, especially more B6 and zinc. You need those to support an increased metabolism.

I heard a very interesting story about 10 years ago. There was a man dying of AIDS. Before he died, he wanted to fulfill a dream of living in a native culture. So, he went to South America and did just that. Within a few weeks, he felt a lot better. He even felt like running through the jungle. When he came back to the US, he was a lot healthier and his T-cell count was considerably higher than when he left. While living with that tribe, his diet consisted of coconut for breakfast, lunch and dinner. For lunch, he also had some fish.

My own experience was that fish made me feel better. So, I started eating it every day. After about a month I noticed that I was starting to feel worse. So, after that, I limited fish consumption to once a week. When I had digestive trouble, I also noticed that raw butter made me feel better, so I was eating a pound of that per week. I didn’t know about coconut oil at that time.

I contend that my battle with yeast overgrowth was due in large part to all the polyunsaturated oils and margarine I ate as a kid. Mom was feeding her kids what “scientists” had told her to do. We ate margarine, Crisco, and French fries cooked in Wesson oil. That was great profits for the seed oil industry, but bad health for the people. “Scientists” had also told my mom not to breast feed her kids. It wasn’t good for the babies. How fucked up is that! If something has been done since the beginning of time, how can one declare it is bad?

We have been duped over and over again by big business. Any time there is even a hint by scientists that a product might be beneficial, marketing campaigns jump on it as solid science. They will say if you don’t agree with them, you are being irrational and against scientific progress. Or if you are a scientist that disagrees, you may lose your job. If olive oil and butter has been used for hundreds of years, why introduce corn oil and say that it is obviously better? Why introduce genetically modified food and say there is nothing wrong with that? Why tell the public there is nothing wrong with irradiated food? You get the picture. If something hasn’t been a part of a traditional diet, then be extremely wary of it. Honestly, I really think people shouldn’t be eating lots of polyunsaturated oils, genetically modified food or irradiated food.

Even if something like soy has been part of a traditional diet, you have to be careful. The Japanese eat soy as a side dish and often it is fermented. They also eat seaweed. The seaweed contains iodine. Since soy gets rid of your iodine, the seaweed counters one of the problems of soy. So, it is how the food is traditionally prepared along with what else is in the diet that is important. Eg. The protein in beans and rice complement each other. If interested, there is an outstanding cookbook you may wish to read called Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon and Mary Enig.

Okay. Back to the topic at hand. Fish oil. Have you noticed that all the studies on “omega-3” oils are done with fish oil? They aren’t just creating pure omega-3 fatty acids in a lab and feeding those to animals. They are using fish oil. Besides omega-3 fatty acids, there are other things in fish oil, hormone like components. Fish oil has the property of making platelets less sticky. There are situations where this can be helpful, including digestive diseases. Yet, too much unbalanced fish oil, and you get all the bad properties of excessive polyunsaturated oils in the diet, including leaky gut. Notice that the South Sea Islanders eat lots of fish, but they also eat coconut. Maybe, they have a good combination in their diet.
02-03-2013, 10:21 AM   #39
Beach
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Coconut oil is good stuff! It goes well with just about everything. I think most people around here have a tough time digesting it though. I've read a number mention that. For what ever reason coconut doesn't bother me much. Probably if I ate heaping spoonfuls as some do I'd have grumpy gut issues, but a little isn't a problem and adds nice flavoring to dishes. I think the coconut oil gives me more energy, and not to mention shinny hair, sometimes a little to shinny.

Well, I had to try it, i avoided fish oil yesterday. Instead I upped the amount of krill oil I take. I'm surprised, I was doing better yesterday. One day doesn't mean much of anything, but didn't expect anything from avoiding fish oil and instead had a nice day. Figure if anything is to it, might have to do with how unstable fish oil is, oxidizing easily. Then again it simply could be that fish oil can be problematic for me, as coconut oil is for others. Another angle I saw was that the fish oil softgels i take have rosemary extract in it. One of the foods I've been avoiding of late is mint. Rosemary I guess is in the same genus family as mint. If one has an issue with one member of the genus family, there is the possibility others are problematic too. And then there is the gut flora issue, brought up in the mouse study, that might have an effect. Anyway, I'll have to continue this for awhile longer and see what comes of it. It's easy to do. No rock unturned.

I guess when it comes to our health care system, I've sometimes wondered if 200 years from now, will people laugh and wonder how we put up with some of the treatments we have today - much as we do today when looking back 200 years in time.

Something that I think most people do not realize with todays medicine is that most doctors do not receive training in nutrition. During all the years spent in medical school, around 2 weeks is spent on understanding diets and the importance of nutrition. Many treatments with modern medicine are greatly beneficial to a great many, but all to often these ideas can fall short of ideal. An unknown part in today health care system is can unique dietary ideas also be helpful in addressing illnesses?

To further follow up on my story of having a CT heart scan and discovering I had deadly growing plaque in an artery. After the test I went home and began reading into ways to address the problem. There really isn't any modern medical treatments to address plaque growth. Todays answer is, if you survive a heart attack, there is the option of bypass surgery or stents. That didn't come across as an attractive route. I wanted to find a possible healthy way to also address plaque growth. If I have a heart attack, I have the ER. So I learned of Dr. Davis's heart healthy plan. I studied up on it. Then I made an appointment with my local doctor. I wanted to gain his help. There are many tests to be done under Dr. Davis's plan that my doctor could arrange.

When I had the meeting with my doctor, to my surprise he told me that he too has plaque in an artery. He had been tested the year before at the same facility as me. He also was familiar with Dr. Davis's plaque reversal ideas and thought well of them. Then when it came to the nitty gritty, the testing I wanted, my doctor was not helpful. He only suggested that I take fish oil, some aspirin, and prescribed a statin drug. He was willing to arrange a simple cholesterol panel and that was pretty much it. I tried to get more out of him, and later his nurse, why they were not being more helpful. Never could get an answer. I suspect I know why though. The hospital has protocols for addressing different health condition. To go outside of the protocols could result in law suite liabilities.

So in someways the situation makes me chuckle. I suspect there is a decent possibility my former doctor is following the same heart healthy plaque stabilizing plan I am. And yet, he doesn't help others to follow it.

I thought this a nice article by doctor Pauline Chen, about her uneasiness in being taught little about nutrition and dietary ideas.

"Teaching Doctors About Nutrition and Diet"

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/16/he...chen.html?_r=0

& recall this article

"Lies, Damned Lies, and Medical Science"

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/...cience/308269/
02-03-2013, 10:30 AM   #40
723crossroads
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Coconut oil is good stuff! It goes well with just about everything. I think most people around here have a tough time digesting it though. I've read a number mention that. For what ever reason coconut doesn't bother me much. Probably if I ate heaping spoonfuls as some do I'd have grumpy gut issues, but a little isn't a problem and adds nice flavoring to dishes. I think the coconut oil gives me more energy, and not to mention shinny hair, sometimes a little to shinny.

Well, I had to try it, i avoided fish oil yesterday. Instead I upped the amount of krill oil I take. I'm surprised, I was doing better yesterday. One day doesn't mean much of anything, but didn't expect anything from avoiding fish oil and instead had a nice day. Figure if anything is to it, might have to do with how unstable fish oil is, oxidizing easily. Then again it simply could be that fish oil can be problematic for me, as coconut oil is for others. Another angle I saw was that the fish oil softgels i take have rosemary extract in it. One of the foods I've been avoiding of late is mint. Rosemary I guess is in the same genus family as mint. If one has an issue with one member of the genus family, there is the possibility others are problematic too. And then there is the gut flora issue, brought up in the mouse study, that might have an effect. Anyway, I'll have to continue this for awhile longer and see what comes of it. It's easy to do. No rock unturned.

I guess when it comes to our health care system, I've sometimes wondered if 200 years from now, will people laugh and wonder how we put up with some of the treatments we have today - much as we do today when looking back 200 years in time.

Something that I think most people do not realize with todays medicine is that most doctors do not receive training in nutrition. During all the years spent in medical school, around 2 weeks is spent on understanding diets and the importance of nutrition. Many treatments with modern medicine are greatly beneficial to a great many, but all to often these ideas can fall short of ideal. An unknown part in today health care system is can unique dietary ideas also be helpful in addressing illnesses?

To further follow up on my story of having a CT heart scan and discovering I had deadly growing plaque in an artery. After the test I went home and began reading into ways to address the problem. There really isn't any modern medical treatments to address plaque growth. Todays answer is, if you survive a heart attack, there is the option of bypass surgery or stents. That didn't come across as an attractive route. I wanted to find a possible healthy way to also address plaque growth. If I have a heart attack, I have the ER. So I learned of Dr. Davis's heart healthy plan. I studied up on it. Then I made an appointment with my local doctor. I wanted to gain his help. There are many tests to be done under Dr. Davis's plan that my doctor could arrange.

When I had the meeting with my doctor, to my surprise he told me that he too has plaque in an artery. He had been tested the year before at the same facility as me. He also was familiar with Dr. Davis's plaque reversal ideas and thought well of them. Then when it came to the nitty gritty, the testing I wanted, my doctor was not helpful. He only suggested that I take fish oil, some aspirin, and prescribed a statin drug. He was willing to arrange a simple cholesterol panel and that was pretty much it. I tried to get more out of him, and later his nurse, why they were not being more helpful. Never could get an answer. I suspect I know why though. The hospital has protocols for addressing different health condition. To go outside of the protocols could result in law suite liabilities.

So in someways the situation makes me chuckle. I suspect there is a decent possibility my former doctor is following the same heart healthy plaque stabilizing plan I am. And yet, he doesn't help others to follow it.

I thought this a nice article by doctor Pauline Chen, about her uneasiness in being taught little about nutrition and dietary ideas.

"Teaching Doctors About Nutrition and Diet"

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/16/he...chen.html?_r=0

& recall this article

"Lies, Damned Lies, and Medical Science"

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/...cience/308269/
I believe it has alot to do with your insurance companies. They do have a protocol they have to follow for them. One step at a time , as for tests, If you have say a back issue, first you go for xrays. If they give any inclination of a problem, then you maybe allowed the MRI. Then next step if MRI shows problems. Physical therapy. If that doesn't work, then home traction. Then Finally if agreed upon, surgery. I know this because I went thru th whole gammet and so did my husband. That is why your Dr. is doing it this way.
02-03-2013, 10:48 AM   #41
Beach
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What ever the cause, insurance protocol or hospital/ doctor concerns over liability, I wasn't getting help or answers on why I wasn't being helped in the manner I wished. The nice part is today it's possible to arrange many of the tests on your own, which in the end is the route I took.
02-03-2013, 02:51 PM   #42
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You're lucky, not for the chest pains obviously, but not having plaque! Fingers crossed on my part. I've was told I was at a 5% risk of a cardiac per year - if I didn't take preventive measures.
The fat found in plaque is mainly polyunsaturated. It really makes you wonder what we have been doing wrong with our diet. Those Islanders eating coconut and fish don't have the plaque problems. In fact, a lot of native diets are heart healthy compared to what we are eating here in the USA.

I'd like to point out an important nutrient that is getting more press as of late -- Vitamin K2. K2 is very important for preventing plaque build-up. As a bonus, it blocks an enzyme that forms PGE2. (Unfortunately, there are other enzymes and ways that yeast can create PGE2. So vitamin K2 isn't a perfect counter to the PGE2 problem of yeast.)

Here is a study of plaque build up caused by Warfarin/Coumadin. Warfarin not only interferes with K1, but also with K2.

http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.fr...-arterial.html

(snip...) "Rats are able to convert vitamin K1 to K2 MK-4, whereas humans don't seem to convert well. Conversion efficiency varies between species. Dr. Vermeer's group treated rats with warfarin for 6 weeks, during which they developed extensive arterial calcification. They also received vitamin K1 to keep their blood clotting properly. At 6 weeks, the warfarin-treated rats were broken up into several groups:

· One continued on the warfarin and K1 diet

· One was placed on a diet containing a normal amount of K1 (no warfarin)

· One was placed on a high K1 diet (no warfarin)

· The last was placed on a high K2 MK-4 diet (no warfarin)

After 6 more weeks, the first two groups developed even more calcification, while the third and fourth groups lost about 40% of their arterial calcium. The high vitamin K groups also saw a decrease in cell death in the artery wall, a decrease in uncarboxylated (inactive), and an increase in arterial elasticity. They also measured the vitamin K content of aortas from each group. The group that received the 12-week warfarin treatment had a huge amount of K1 accumulation in the aorta, but no K2 MK-4. This is expected because warfarin inhibits the conversion of K1 to K2 MK-4. It's notable that when conversion to K2 was blocked, K1 alone was totally ineffective at activating MGP and preventing calcification." (more...)
02-03-2013, 03:12 PM   #43
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Well, I had to try it, i avoided fish oil yesterday. Instead I upped the amount of krill oil I take. I'm surprised, I was doing better yesterday. One day doesn't mean much of anything, but didn't expect anything from avoiding fish oil and instead had a nice day. Figure if anything is to it, might have to do with how unstable fish oil is, oxidizing easily. Then again it simply could be that fish oil can be problematic for me, as coconut oil is for others. Another angle I saw was that the fish oil softgels i take have rosemary extract in it. One of the foods I've been avoiding of late is mint. Rosemary I guess is in the same genus family as mint. If one has an issue with one member of the genus family, there is the possibility others are problematic too. And then there is the gut flora issue, brought up in the mouse study, that might have an effect. Anyway, I'll have to continue this for awhile longer and see what comes of it. It's easy to do. No rock unturned.
Possibly for you, the krill oil is what you need, for another person, it may be the fish oil. I think there has been a lot more study with fish oil than krill oil. I wonder what the differences really are. Krill oil isn't a part of a native human diet. So, I'm a bit wary of it.

As I mentioned previously, fish oil makes platelets less sticky, which can be a good thing. I just read a really informative article about pantethine. It has a lot of good properties. However, for the purposes of this IBD discussion, I would like to point out that pantethine not only helps to get rid of yeast, but it improves the integrity of platelets, making them less sticky.

http://www.wellnessresources.com/tip...etoxification/

"In people with chronic inflammation, platelets become sticky, increasing the risk for excessive clotting and stroke. ...pantethine has been shown to improve the health of the cell membrane of platelets, helping them perform much more normally and in a less sticky manner."
02-03-2013, 03:52 PM   #44
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Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) is one problem associated with Crohn's and colitis. SIBO increases a person's exposure to LPS from gram negative bacteria and increases a person's expose to more D-lactic acid from bacteria. Both of these properties of SIBO make it harder to heal any type of disease in the body. So, it is important to address this problem as well as just the IBD.

Inflammation increases the chance that you will end up with SIBO. Strictures and scar tissue will also increase the chances that you end up with SIBO. So, it is quite likely that IBD increases the chance of a person ending up with SIBO. Here is a little information on what can cause SIBO, and how yeast fit into this picture.

CAUSES OF SIBO

Some of the causes of SIBO can be a damaged vagus nerve, adhesions, intestinal inflammation, scleroderma, hormonal imbalance or nutritional deficiencies. These in turn can be caused by many different things.

Vagus nerve damage. This can be caused by certain bacterial or viral infections, heavy metals, MSG (monosodium glutamate), pesticides, or diabetes. A misaligned neck or hiatal hernia could also pinch or put pressure on the nerve. A lack of vitamin B1 is particularly detrimental to the functioning of the vagus nerve.

Adhesions. These may be due to infections, endometriosis or surgery.

Intestinal inflammation. This may be due to stress, poor food choices or the presence of certain bacteria, parasites, viruses , or yeast. A poorly functioning vagus nerve also leads to increased inflammation.

Scleroderma. This is a rare disorder and its cause is generally unknown. However, learning a little about it is instructive. Tryptophan and 5-HTP can induce this condition. Natural progesterone and MSM sulfur may be of some help. Avoid fluoride.

Hormonal Imbalance. This often due to a poorly functioning liver or thyroid. These in turn might be weak due to infections, nutritional deficiencies, toxins and stress.

Nutritional deficiencies. All nutrients are important for a healthy body and a healthy functioning intestinal system. However, we should take note that vitamins A and D are particularly important for keeping our gut flora healthy. Without vitamin A and D, the gut becomes populated with harmful residents. Zinc is also important. It is needed to release stored vitamin A from the liver. Vitamin B12 is also important here. Unfortunately, the SIBO will interfere with the absorption of B12 and your fat soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K. (K1 may be adequate when SIBO is present because bacteria create this. However, I'm concerned about adequate K2 here.)

As you can see, this is a whole body illness. It isn't just a lack of one nutrient or one hormone. It can even be a mechanical injury like a misaligned neck, or a hiatal hernia that is contributing to SIBO. Even stress comes in here, since that will increase your exposure to free serotonin, which will increase fibrin formation.

YEAST and THE HOUSEKEEPER WAVE

Yeast can be a contributor to SIBO. One mechanism is their production of acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde is the first break down product of alcohol and does much of the damage caused by alcoholism. (Alcoholism is a known cause of SIBO.) Acetaldehyde interferes with the housekeeper wave through multiple mechanisms. The housekeeper wave is a primary way of keeping the bacteria levels down in the small intestine. (The small intestine is not supposed to have a lot of bacteria in it.) Yeast produce acetaldehyde and they even have a few more tricks up their sleeve that interfere with the housekeeper wave and intestinal motility. Here are some of the ways in which yeast do this.

Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) inhibits the housekeeper wave. Yeast make PGE2. Yeast also make acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde inhibits delta-6-desaturase and this inhibition tends to increase the body’s production of PGE2.

Motilin is needed to trigger the housekeeper wave. Some yeast are capable of making somatostatin which inhibits motilin. (Researchers have shown that the yeast called Saccharomyces cerevisiae secretes somatostatin. Other yeast are known to have receptors for somatostatin. http://www.jbc.org/content/263/30/15342.full.pdf )

Thyroid hormone is needed for proper intestinal motility. Yeast products can interfere with the thyroid. Somatostatin from yeast overgrowth could theoretically lower thyroid hormone by lowering TSH. The acetaldehyde from yeast interferes with g proteins that signal the thyroid. Yeast can make estradiol (an estrogen), which lowers thyroid.

Histamine inhibits the housekeeper wave. An allergic response causes the release of histamine. Yeast overgrowth is associated with an increased number of allergies, including allergies to yeast.

A lack of stomach acid interferes with the triggering of the housekeeper wave. Yeast overgrowth can lower stomach acid. One way in which yeast do this is by interfering with the production of acetylcholine, which triggers the production of stomach acid. Another way in which yeast do this is by making an H. pylori infection harder to eradicate. (H. pylori can hide within yeast cells.) H. pylori down-regulates the production of stomach acid.

Acetylcholine produced by the vagus nerve is one of the primary triggers for the housekeeper wave. Yeast lower acetylcholine. Also the vagus nerve’s release of acetylcholine acts through the spleen to help control inflammation in the body. Interfering with this is another way in which yeast increase inflammation in the body. (It is the acetaldehyde made by the yeast that interferes with the creation of acetylcholine.)

Opiates increase histamine and interfere with the housekeeper wave. Yeast make acetaldehyde, which promotes the formation of opiate-like substances. (The acetaldehyde from yeast can react with neurotransmitters like serotonin or dopamine to create opiate-like substances called tetrahydroisoquinolines.)

Serotonin and dopamine are signaling molecules in the intestines. Yeast produce acetaldehyde which forms adducts with serotonin and dopamine and makes them unavailable for their intended purposes.

The vagus nerve triggers the housekeeper wave. The yeast produce acetaldehyde which gets rid of vitamin B1. A lack of vitamin B1 will affect the functioning of the vagus nerve.
03-17-2013, 08:12 PM   #45
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Is there somewhere on the forum that will give me a simplified list of what my son needs for Crohns.. vitamins, supplements, etc. He is on Remicade and is doing ok, but the thought of him being on that scares us. So if there's someone who has brands, dosages, etc... I have been searching and searching and am so overwhelmed with trying to find what he needs, without additives he doesn't in the correct doses, in an easy to absorb formula, etc. I'm also not sure what he doesn't need to take while on remicade, and how to know when we can safely take him off of remicade without him getting worse again.

Thanks in advance
03-17-2013, 10:44 PM   #46
723crossroads
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Is there somewhere on the forum that will give me a simplified list of what my son needs for Crohns.. vitamins, supplements, etc. He is on Remicade and is doing ok, but the thought of him being on that scares us. So if there's someone who has brands, dosages, etc... I have been searching and searching and am so overwhelmed with trying to find what he needs, without additives he doesn't in the correct doses, in an easy to absorb formula, etc. I'm also not sure what he doesn't need to take while on remicade, and how to know when we can safely take him off of remicade without him getting worse again.

Thanks in advance
My advice to you would be to contact David, our administrator. He could help you better than anyone.I sent him a PM to contact you so, you should hear from him shortly.
03-18-2013, 06:21 AM   #47
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While I didn't take the time to read this entire thread (some of the posts were long enough to reach novel status ) I did get the overall "yeast is bad" tone.

IMO, that's using an overly broad brush to paint the picture. Just as there are good/bad bacteria, there are good/bad yeasts. Don't throw the baby out with the bathwater; you want to keep the good yeast/bacteria while getting rid of the bad.

I have been taking Sachromyces Boulardii yeast, and it is second only to prednisone on how well it helps control my CD symptoms.

I'll let the research do the talking...

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10961730:

"Abstract

The possible role of Saccharomyces boulardii, a nonpathogenic yeast with beneficial effects on the human intestine, in the maintenance treatment of Crohn's disease has been evaluated. Thirty-two patients with Crohn's disease in clinical remission (CDAI < 150) were randomly treated for six months with either mesalamine 1 g three times a day or mesalamine 1 g two times a day plus a preparation of Saccharomyces boulardii 1 g daily. Clinical relapses as assessed by CDAI values were observed in 37.5% of patients receiving mesalamine alone and in 6.25% of patients in the group treated with mesalamine plus the probiotic agent. Our results suggest that Saccharomyces boulardii may represent a useful tool in the maintenance treatment of Crohn's disease. However, in view of the product's cost, further controlled studies are needed to confirm these preliminary data."

I'm gonna summarize the information from Here (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20440854) to say that this study found Saccharomyces boulardii to be among the most effective of the yeasts and bacteria tested in this study at controlling inflammation.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19706150:

"Abstract

BACKGROUND: Saccharomyces boulardii, a well-studied probiotic, can be effective in inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases with diverse pathophysiology, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and bacterially mediated or enterotoxin-mediated diarrhoea and inflammation.

AIM: To discuss the mechanisms of action involved in the intestinal anti-inflammatory action of S. boulardii.

METHODS: Review of the literature related to the anti-inflammatory effects of this probiotic.

RESULTS: Several mechanisms of action have been identified directed against the host and pathogenic microorganisms. S. boulardii and S. boulardii secreted-protein(s) inhibit production of proinflammatory cytokines by interfering with the global mediator of inflammation nuclear factor kappaB, and modulating the activity of the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK1/2 and p38. S. boulardii activates expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) that protects from gut inflammation and IBD. S. boulardii also suppresses 'bacteria overgrowth' and host cell adherence, releases a protease that cleaves C. difficile toxin A and its intestinal receptor and stimulates antibody production against toxin A. Recent results indicate that S. boulardii may interfere with IBD pathogenesis by trapping T cells in mesenteric lymph nodes.

CONCLUSIONS: The multiple anti-inflammatory mechanisms exerted by S. boulardii provide molecular explanations supporting its effectiveness in intestinal inflammatory states."

Edit: Darn it, the links to pubmed aren't working anymore. I had the above links/texts saved from a couple years ago when I was researching S. Boulardii, and it looks like pubmed has revamped their cataloging system since that time. The quoted text was accurate from the studies linked to, even though the links themselves no longer point at the studies.

Another Edit: Here's a rather long one that goes in to some very specific detail of how S. Boulardii helps in IBD: http://physiologie.envt.fr/masterEQS...bli_EQSA_2.pdf
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Meds:
Azathioprine - 100 mg.
Pentasa - 1 gm.
S. Boulardi yeast - 1 gm
Vitamin D - 6,000 IU
Magnesium - 500 mg
Calcium - 1,000 mg
Supportive Wife - 1 unit

Last edited by CrohnsDaddy; 03-18-2013 at 06:47 AM.
03-18-2013, 10:14 AM   #48
PollyH
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S. boulardii has its good and bad points. It has been used as a probiotic for over 50 years. It had a nick name of "yeast against yeast." I guess people assumed it replaced a more harmful yeast. As you point out, this yeast may be of use in Crohn's, and can help get rid of a very nasty bacteria called C. difficile. The problem is that this yeast can also overgrow in the intestines. (Report from the Great Plains Laboratory.) It may also end up in the blood as well, making some people very ill. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC262466/ At the very least, if you wish to employ the S. boulardii, I would also try taking some of the bacteria probiotics that are normal intestinal residents, like found in the probiotic VSL#3.

Just because something is an effective probiotic doesn't mean it is entirely safe. There is also a potentially very serious problem with soil-based probiotics. If those overgrow and get into the blood, there are no antibiotics that get rid of them. If you wish to use soil-based probiotics, you might want to employ them for only a brief period of time, and follow up their use with something like the VSL#3 probiotics. Only a small amount of the soil-based probiotics can make a significant difference. From what I've read, there is no need to use high doses.

VSL#3 probiotics have also been shown to keep Crohn's in remission. VSL#3 won't put a person into remission by itself, but it will extend the time of remission. High doses are needed to get this result. VSL#3 consists of bacteria that are normal residents of the intestines. For that reason, I think it is a safer probiotic than the S. boulardii or the soil-based bacteria. However, as with anything, you might not tolerate a full therapeutic dose. Start very slow and work up to an amount you can tolerate. If it seems to be making things worse, stop. Even VSL#3 might make things worse.

I know of two reasons that the VSL#3 probiotic might pose a problem.

1) It will put a high number of bacteria in the small intestine. If the housekeeper wave in the small intestine isn't working as well as it should, then the small intestine will have trouble removing the large amount of bacteria. This can make you ill.

2) Blastocystis, a protozoan, lives off of bacteria in the intestines. Therefore taking a probiotic like VSL#3 might make that infection worse.

By the way, Blastocystis is a very common infection that is underdiagnosed. The newer DNA testing has found a much higher prevalence of this infection than previously suspected. Oregano oil will help get rid of this protozoa. The study I'm referring to employed 600 mg of oil of oregano per day for 6 weeks. [1] The type of oregano used was Oreganum vulgare, which is sometimes advertised as wild oregano. (You don't want to use other oreganos because they are often not as effective against pathogens.)

1. Force M, Sparks WS, Ronzio RA, Inhibition of enteric parasites by emulsified oil of oregano in vivo.Phytother Res. 2000 May;14(3):213-4.

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10815019


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03-19-2013, 12:32 PM   #49
PollyH
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Meds:
Azathioprine - 100 mg.
Pentasa - 1 gm.
S. Boulardi yeast - 1 gm
Vitamin D - 6,000 IU
Magnesium - 500 mg
Calcium - 1,000 mg
Supportive Wife - 1 unit
What, only one supportive wife? My great great grandfather (Mormon) had 10 wives and 50 children. He had a rule: No more than 10 kids in a house at a time.
03-22-2013, 12:52 PM   #50
Ya noy
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My God Polly,

You certainly have done your research. I'm going to need some time to digest all this. Thanks!
03-22-2013, 01:02 PM   #51
723crossroads
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Is acidophyllis a safe one to take alot?
03-22-2013, 02:43 PM   #52
PollyH
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Is acidophilus a safe one to take alot?
Acidophilus is a normal resident of the intestines. It is usually found in the small intestine. It is one of the bacteria found in VSL#3. The same general rules apply to acidophilus as the VSL#3.
03-22-2013, 03:01 PM   #53
723crossroads
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Thanx Polly, wanted to make sure!!!
03-26-2013, 01:12 AM   #54
PollyH
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A clinical trial of antifungal treatment in ulcerative colitis showed significantly reduced mucosal inflammation and reduced intensity of symptoms. Out of 89 colitis patients, 20 patients were selected who had a significant amount of fungus in their stool that was susceptible to Diflucan (an antifungal). These 20 patients were treated for 4 weeks with Diflucan. Another 15 of these patients had a significant amount of fungus in their stool that was NOT susceptible to Diflucan. These 15 patients were treated for 4 weeks with lacidofil (a probiotic).

“Antifungal treatment or administration of lacidofil in these patients significantly decreased the total mean activity index of colonic mucosa inflammation as compared with those not treated antifungally (8.5 +/-1.2 and 7.7 +/-1.7 vs. 10.6+/-1.8 respectively) (Fig. 2).”

M. Zwolinska-Wcislo, et al. EFFECT OF CANDIDA COLONIZATION ON HUMAN ULCERATIVE COLITIS AND THE HEALING OF INFLAMMATORY CHANGES OF THE COLON IN THE EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF COLITIS ULCEROSA

JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 2009, 60, 1, 107–118

http://www.jpp.krakow.pl/journal/arc...00000001,0,849
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