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Crohn's Disease Forum » Support Forum » Does anyone have a service dog for Crohn's?


 
06-24-2013, 07:43 AM   #31
sanni
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My dog is a cross breed that is hypoallergenic, so no allergies
There really is no such thing as a hypoallergenic dog. There are breeds that are less prone to cause reactions. Like your dog may be. This is usually due to the type of fur they have. It tight and curly (like poodle fur) and this holds in the dead skin or dandruf of the dog preventing it from spreading everywhere as easy. Its usually the skin that is causing allergys so all dogs have skin = all dogs cause allergy.

Just want to make that clear since dont want people thinking there are breeds that will not caus allergy and then get one and have to abandon it dut to problems. It just depends on the sensitivity of the person on how they react.
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06-24-2013, 03:39 PM   #32
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I'd never considered that a dog could help with IBD!

But why would you need an expensive specially trained dog? The best thing dogs can do for anyone with troubles, including chronic illness, is providing you with love and being something for you to love back. (This just came up on a thread I started on this forum - "Why do people think we can make ourselves better?")

My dog is wonderful. I'm not sure about knowing when I'm ill, but she absolutely knows when I'm emotionally upset - she tries to climb on my lap (even though she's not a small dog at all!) and whimpers when I cry. I'm not sure a dog could help much with IBD beyond emotional support though.

And sorry to spoil the idea by being practical, but dogs need a lot of attention and space and exercise. If you're going to be housebound or in hospital for any period of time, you need to have other family members or friends to take care of your dog. Even if you're just out at work all day, it's not really right to leave a dog alone all day. My dog starts crying if she's left on her own for more than five minutes. If everyone else is out of the house, and I'm stuck in the bathroom (which, with this illness, can take a while!) I always hear her whimpering outside the door. I think the only time she's more than two feet away from me is when I'm in the bathroom. And since that's the main symptom of Crohn's, I'm not exactly sure how my dog could help me, she just makes me feel guilty for leaving her alone and gives me one more reason for hating being in the bathroom so much!
06-24-2013, 04:01 PM   #33
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There really is no such thing as a hypoallergenic dog. There are breeds that are less prone to cause reactions. Like your dog may be. This is usually due to the type of fur they have. It tight and curly (like poodle fur) and this holds in the dead skin or dandruf of the dog preventing it from spreading everywhere as easy. Its usually the skin that is causing allergys so all dogs have skin = all dogs cause allergy.

Just want to make that clear since dont want people thinking there are breeds that will not caus allergy and then get one and have to abandon it dut to problems. It just depends on the sensitivity of the person on how they react.
A hypoallergenic dog was news to me. But, I agree with you sanni. It seemed to me that some people are just allergic to animals no matter if they had hair or fur. But, in experience with my husband. He does better with those that have hair rather than those that have fur.

I just suggest making sure no matter what that there's no allergies with those owning the animal before spending all that money to house, feed, purchase and keep a dog. Although, I am thankful for those who do have animals already that can comfort them...
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02-17-2014, 11:29 PM   #34
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Hi I'm new to this forum and I just wanted to say I have a service dog for my Crohns. He can indicate on me 30 mins before I have my first symptom, which for me once I get back pain I have less than 5 mins to find a bathroom. I am currently trying to start a research study to train service dogs for crohns disease. My dog Blaze has been a life saver. He comes to work with me every day and he has helped me regain my freedom. So much so that I drove to Michigan with him to teach a class and drove across country to California. He indicates on me in the car and since it is consistently 30 mins before my First symptom I have plenty of time to get to a bathroom. Prior to training Blaze ( I trained him myself) I could NOT work when I got a flare up. Episodes would last for days because of the fear of leaving the house would keep me in it. I have soiled myself on many occasions because I tried to make it to a bathroom and could Not get out of the car. Crohns is horrible. I am hoping to get the University of Pennsylvania (Penn Working Dog Center) to fund a research study because this would give so many suffering from this dis-ease a freedom they may have not had in years.
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02-18-2014, 01:06 PM   #35
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That's great, Blaze!

Out of curiosity, how do you train a dog to sense oncoming symptoms? How exactly does the dog tell you're going to get sick?
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02-18-2014, 04:15 PM   #36
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Hi Sarahbear,

Blaze is so Intuned to me I didn't have to do a lot of work. I train by basically teaching scent detection. Prior to us getting symptoms are body is already putting out changes in our chemical make up and inflammation produces a scent. I don't know Exactly what Blaze is scenting it could be the over growth of bacteria, chemical change, inflammation. This is why I want to do a study on it. I helped Blaze tighten up his indication by showing once he found the scent ( while I was in the middle of a severe episode, he was rewarded when he nudged my arm. Meaning he had to leave the scent come over to me get behind my arm and nudge it. This took a little time but he is incredibly smart so it was fairly easy. He loves to work and loves to be with me so that in itself is training.

He somehow scents/ senses changes in my body and indicates on me consistently 30 before I get a symptom. The ability of dogs to alert and their sense of smell is well beyond what is really known and they have a scent library in their mind and never forget a scent.
02-18-2014, 04:44 PM   #37
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Awesome! I figured it was some sort of chemical change - that's how they sense oncoming seizures. How old was Blaze when you started training? What did you have to do to get him registered as a service dog?
02-18-2014, 05:12 PM   #38
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Blaze was 3 when I realized what he was doing. In hindsight, he was telling me around the age of 2- 2 1/2yrs old but I never put the two together.
Any age dog can be trained. A couple things that the dog should possess a stable personality and high drive.

Unfortunately there isn't a true registry but Blaze had to go through a public access test.( Pat) to be sure he has a stable mind and will be safe in public. This is one part of the training program. I bought the vest off of a working dog site. I have documentation from my doctor showing I am diagnosed with Crohn's.

The dog must be able to preform 3 specific tasks for the handler. Blaze indicates on me, calms me after a episode which helps keep it from becoming severe, and is able to guard me while I'm in the bathroom. I have had to use port o potties in I favorable areas and he guards the door, if someone approaches he just holds his ground and may Bark although he hasn't had to do that often.

As far as obeidence training the dog must be extremely trained. If the handler loses control of the leash te dog must stay with the owner or of the owner passes out the dog must seek help. I was not eating before I trained Blaze because my flares were so bad so there were a few occassions when I passed out and Blaze stayed by me Barking for help. I was on a walking path and he left me got help and brought them back to me. That was a 15 day stay in the hospital. He has saved my life on more than one occasion.
02-18-2014, 05:26 PM   #39
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Pretty interesting. I'm familiar with dog training in general. My boyfriend is learning to be a handler. He will be able to train working and personal protection dogs, and of course any level of obedience. They usually don't start training dogs until at least eight months old though, to ensure that they're emotionally stable. Any dog can't undergo high levels of obedience training. That statement isn't directed at you, btw, Blaze - I just want to make sure no one misunderstands.

We're only allowed to have three dogs within city limits, so for the time being, it's no service dog for me. However, I'd love to have one eventually. It's a little clear exactly how someone goes about registering (for lack of a better term - would certifying be better?) a service dog.
02-18-2014, 05:33 PM   #40
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That is correct not all breeds or dogs are cut out for a high level of obedience. Most service dogs have to be 1 year before going through the PAT test. There is no reason you can't use one of your current dogs. Really registering would be closer. I can't post links yet but once I can I could offer better references.
02-18-2014, 05:38 PM   #41
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The first person I connected with after my daughters diagnosis who had crohns was in the process of training her first Havenese training dog. She shared how great her dog was and why she chose to do this for herself and others. Our lifestyle doesnt lend itself to a dog much, but if it did I can understand the great benefits a service dog can bring for IBD. She is in Ontario, Canada and she knew of others in places like Germany doing it for the same reason. Would love to hear success stories of others that have one!

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02-18-2014, 05:40 PM   #42
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My dachshund definitely could not do it. He's too strong-willed and stubborn to train. Obedience training would break him. One thing they watch for is resentment after the training stops - if the dog immediately goes back to normal and interacts with people happily, then it can train. If the dog keeps it's distance and acts defensive, it can't handle it. He's the defensive type. We're very well synced, though - he doesn't need much training because on most occasions what he wants to do just happens to be what I want him to do - and when it's not, I just pick him up and hold him. My other dog doesn't do that - he responds well to people even during training. At the present he's a little too excitable to keep under control reliably. He's not very old, though (today is his first birthday).
02-18-2014, 06:03 PM   #43
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I have been training dogs for 14 years and know dogs been I. The industry for 24 years. The interesting thing about service dogs is above Obedience the dog must possess a sound mind. There was recently a new cast about what looked like a American bulldog who was a "service" dog and out of no where after several people passed by him he lunged at a man and bit his leg. This was not provoked and to me that is a dangerous dog. No matter what happens Blaze must have a calm stable mind. He cannot seek out attention and all eyes must be on me and the surrounding area. The main problem is people who just want to be able to fly their dog in the cabin and they buy the vests and call the dog a service dog. When Blaze and I were in Chicago and we went to Millenium Park ( strictly off limits to dogs) we were stopped and asked a series of questions and after that the security guards all called ahead and Blaze and I were left to enjoy out time. Blaze also went with me to the Chicago institute of modern art. People who saw him asked about him and commended me on how well behaved he was and some never even realized he was there!!
02-18-2014, 06:10 PM   #44
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That's great! The dogs I've seen trained are police dogs, but the trainer is the one who worked with my dog (although just briefly, as we really just wanted to get him under control) and does train others. These dogs are absolutely incredible - obedience wise, they're above and beyond typical police dogs, even. It's impressive how well behaved they are. If I do get a service dog, it will definitely be trained by the same person and in the same manner. It would just be stressful to have an unruly dog with you at all times.
02-18-2014, 06:18 PM   #45
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That is great!! And true it would be stressful for the dog and you if they couldn't handle the work o a service dog.
06-26-2016, 06:08 AM   #46
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Personally I think it could be more hassle than its worth. I know when I was in a proper flare all I wanted to do is sit around the house and sleep. A dog wouldnt be able to cook, clean etc for me but I would have to take it for walks twice a day, feed it, keep it company. Things that I could not be bothered to do when I was ill (I looked after my parent dogs for a weekend and that was enough)

What exactly do you expect from this dog?
So I was just randomly searching the Internet to see what I could do if anything to train my dog, or if a therapy dog even needs to be trained because in my personal experience with my dog I got around age 11, and he passed around age 11, and be passed 5 1/2 years ago, during my current flare that is the worst of my life and the longest I've ever had. I had read in many places how anyone with chronic illnesses should strongly consider owning a dog, even a cat if that's your thing. So when my dog of 11 years passed I didn't last 4 months before I needed a 4 legged companion.

I know this thread goes back to 2013, but I just came across it and this post stuck out to me the most, so I registered to this forum, I've never been apart of one of these before, but I really wanted to reply to this.

I am 27 years old and have terrifying memories of my Crohn's Disease at age 2, I was diagnosed at age 9. And I've been blessed that my flares have always been treated prompt and quick and I lead a fairly average life. But Spencer, my dog who passed away in the middle of my current flare that's nearing 7 years straight, I about died with him. He was never a hassle. From the day he came home with me - he sensed I was sick. On my really bad days he wouldn't leave my side... Playing, walks, fetch didn't interest him. Be naturally grew up as an indoor dog unless I was outside with him or he was going to the bathroom. I got a dog for the sole purpose for the therapeutic benefits. I didn't take him to training or anything but he just knew when I needed him, and he knew when we could play. My lip swells sometimes as a flare is coming and be would sniff it out, when I'd feel a pain in my stomach he'd be sniffing it out. Plus the cuddles and petting can help calm you when your in distress. My pain never goes away. I read how you said that when you're in a flare and I'll you don't want to move so how can you walk and play and feed a dog when you can't do those things for yourself, well my first dog, I was still a child and my parents did that stuff for me, and Spencer took care of me. When I had a long remission I was able to go off to college on time with the rest of my class, but he couldn't come to the dorms, and my second year it was too expensive of a deposit to have him, and I didn't know special training and/or letters stating my need for him could have helped him come with me. But I was in remission so it wasn't so hard. I never finished college. Soon after turning 21, my full course load, full time job at a casino which means 50+ hours, and an active social life - I spiraled into a flare. I was on Humira and the doctor confirmed it had stopped working, I didn't want to give up my college life so I commuted and tried my best to muscle through it, I've lived with active symptoms and pain my whole life but have never been a candidate for surgery because I was diagnosed so young that medication kept me on the up and up and if something stopped then there was always something else.... But this time the doc tried a few things and my body rejected them. My pain levels were higher than they ever have been and my doctor claimed she saw nothing in scans or scopes to cause that kind of pain - I knew she thought I was faking. As she had me admitted into the hospital for the 5 th time in 5 months, she told me I front of my mom and brother that the only thing left to do was remove my colon. My brother immediately started texting his wife who works at University of Michigan to use her connections to get me the best doctor, because we all knew that with the 20 ulcers in my mouth and active disease in my esophagus and having been diagnosed from the start with "stem to stern" Crohn's you don't just remove someone's colon that isn't blocked, when the disease is in places you can't remove. If we could all just remove our colons I think many of us would gladly take a bag over a colon to feel healthy and human. I think she was trying to see my reaction to see if I was faking and drug seeking. After discharge I never went to my scheduled appts with her again. My current doctor was contacted by someone who works with VIPs and instead of the well known wait lists for this doctor I was in within 3 weeks. He agrees to this day that my dog helps me. I've gotten a bit off track here.

My current dog, Jeffrey (I give my dogs human names &#128578 was 6 months old the day we went to get him. He has never known any different than his mom (me) being stuck in bed most days... And he's 5. He loves being outside and when I have the strength to go play my parents tell me he's never that happy when they go out to play with him. I can imagine living on my own that some dog care responsibilities can be hard, but I am 27 and at age 22, doctors orders I couldn't live on my own and had to leave college and my friends to live with my parents. They're a huge help with my dog - I'm very sick every day, I have tried every medication available. I've been in 4 clinical trials. The medicines either don't work, or I've had allergic reactions to IV treatments like remicade and entyvio. Maybe if Jeffrey had been laying next to my infusion chair he would have been able smell the smells of my body rejecting it before the nurses saw the machines and my skin, I've gone into Rigors 3 times and they had crash carts called each time because they didn't catch what was wrong fast enough that my reaction was so bad the next step was cardiac arrest. My dog goes into deep depression when I am hospitalized, as do I wishing he was laying with me, when my stomach hurts he nuzzles his head right into it. He is an Australian cattle dog, 65 lbs. not exactly a lap dog, when I'm on the couch and my pain is rising he gets up and tucks himself on the couch with me his two right or left legs hanging off and lays there as long as I do. When the pain subsides he gets up and stretches. He does it like he has a job. I would love if there was some way he could accompany me when in the ER and admitted, for infusions and all.

Any small hassle that may come to get up to feed him (which could be only once a month with automatic food and water dishes) is worth what I've benefited from these two dogs that self taught themselves to care for me.

And I am about to start The Makers Diet - it's a book worth reading. Along with another book my mom just read called eat dirt. I will still take my medications that don't work and see my doctor who is head of research and I believe will help me one day, but I'm going holistic. In the book "eat dirt" it even talks about how having a dog is good for you because the dirt you can get into your body from petting your dog after they play outside is good for you, we are missing our good bacteria.

So I don't know how these forums work and if everyone on this 3 year old thread will be notified or what, or maybe I am supposed to make a new post with the info I'm now saying, even though I haven't begun yet but I have high hopes.

I just nod when people talk about my eating habits or say which diets I should try when they don't even know what IBD is, but they tell me their friend was "cured" by such and such. If someone was cured I think we'd all know and be cured too.

But two book recommendations..... The Makers Diet and Eat Dirt. My mom did it for a few months and lost 50 pounds but then I landed in the hospital followed by my dads triple bypass and she lost all her progress, and I was barely eating so I couldn't really participate. But I have a bit more of an appetite these days so we are re starting the makers diet, along with recommendations and all things in the Eat Dirt book. Which strangely talked about "grounding" which I was researching and telling my mom about before she found this book, it's about getting closer to the earth, getting the healthy bacteria in our guts. Taking epson salt and lavender oil baths every night helps you absorb magnesium which every time I'm in the hospital my levels are low.

We are also diving head first into essential oils, I've dabbled and felt relief and so I'm going full in to it. Western medicine is failing me, the holistic approach can't hurt, and that includes my dog, who as I write this not knowing if anyone will see it cas I don't know how these forums work, he's snuggled into my stomach right where the pain is, his body heat eases the pain I think.

Also, Crohn's disease has affected my mouth terribly, the dentist tells me if I brushed and flossed and used a water pick 6 times a day I would still have gingivitis. I have receding gums that are so annoying.... And as I've researched oils and such, I came across oil pulling, they say a healthy gut leads to a healthy mouth, well I can't make my gut healthy so I have to work on my mouth, just google oil pulling and it explains how to do it, it pulls toxins from your mouth and leads to healing of the whole body, it whitens teeth, can decrease and rid gingivitis, can stop your gums from being red and inflamed which Crohn's does to me, it affects my mouth tremendously, but it also can stop your gums from receding any further and even when your gums become healthy and toxin free the gums can grow back, certain oils like peppermint, myrhh, clove, can stimulate blood flow to help regrowth which sounds a hell of a lot better than the surgery I could have to have grafting my gums.


I may repost the info about the books and oil pulling elsewhere to see if anyone else has heard of it and or done any of it and gotten results if I can figure out this website. I've read through plenty when looking for opinions to questions but never joined the conversation.
06-26-2016, 07:46 AM   #47
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My wife has a service dog because she is in a wheelchair. I have heard they have them for people who have Crohns Disease. I think that a lot of times he can sense when I am not feeling well. Also, I have heard that the warmth of their body can be very beneficial up against your stomach like a heating pad. Forgive me if this is repetitive
06-28-2016, 03:14 AM   #48
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My wife has a service dog because she is in a wheelchair. I have heard they have them for people who have Crohns Disease. I think that a lot of times he can sense when I am not feeling well. Also, I have heard that the warmth of their body can be very beneficial up against your stomach like a heating pad. Forgive me if this is repetitive
As I stated in my previous reply with the main point to be that dogs can be very be benificial to IBD patients. I can see how people who own a dog or dogs and raised them maybe while in remission or as their kids dogs and they expect to be walked and played sir and are rambunctious that the only thought would be - that's way too much work during a flare. But even the untrained dogs or dogs of healthy people can sense pain and health issues in guests or other dogs. My brother and his wife had two dogs, Jake and Dude. Dude at an old age was full of lumps and arthritis. The lumps were cancer, but with daily aspirin he was in no pain, so they obviously wanted to keep him and care for him with the best quality of life until the cancer caused him pain and he would either pass on his own or be put down, the vet told them when it was time. But their other younger dog who is also now gone... Knew his buddy was sick, always trying to comfort him. I brought my dog Jeffrey over well before he turned 1 - he's now 5. My previous dog was never socialized as a pup and never played well with other dogs, he was a brat to them lol. So I took Jeff to socialize with my brothers dogs... But dude was so sick he wanted nothing to do with him, and all Jake wanted to do is play with Jeff, but Jeff was a baby and sniffing out all of Dude's tumors, and trying to cuddle. Eventually Dude went and hid from my dog lol and then him and the other played.
But my brother and his wife are healthy people, Jake is your every day pet. I was at their house with my other 4 brothers and their wives and kids and our parents. I miss many family events but I felt ok this day and went, they had this chair that I always claimed because it was a comfy "chair and a half" with an ottoman. Jake was a golden retriever, by no means a lap dog. After eating, my pain was off the charts as usual. I was sitting in the big chair and suffering. Jake usually never calmed down when there is a house full of people.... He stunned his "parents" when they looked over and he had crawled up onto the chair and didn't sit where I moved over to make room, but made sure he was laying with his head on me snuggled up into the blankets, his only concern was me. Everyone was shocked, my family knows that it's my lower right abdomen that usually has the most issue, they witnessed him sniffing that area, then laying his head on the area.

My dog, is an Australian Cattle Dog. They are very smart dogs. Now he isn't trained as a service dog, or a therapy dog or and "emotional service dog" he was just raised with me me from about 6 weeks. I was in this same flare when I got him. He was 1 of 4 left in the litter. And just like my last dog, I didn't look for the one I wanted - he's pure bred so they were equally cute and looked the same. I sat while they played and jumped on me and ran off to play and let a dog choose me. All the other dogs kept running around the farm, but this sweet boy got in my lap, gave me sweet eyes and kisses, ran around me, he then crawled under my car and gazed at me. The breeders said all of those acts they had never seen any pups do that. I told them I was chronically ill and they said well I guess this guy picked you. My mom and I had driven 3 1/2 hours when I found this breed online and these dogs available. I tried to adopt but the hoops to jump through its no wonder so many dogs need adoption. And also, I knew I needed a puppy. There's many older dogs in need of homes but I knew my plan was to raise a puppy and I thought of getting him specifically trained and certified but I was so sick, I decided to just raise him up as my 4 legged caregiver. Our first day home with him, he laid by my side. He sniffed out my pain. I knew I had the perfect dog. His body heat does help my pain. I suffer from anxiety and panic attacks.... Him being close to me his heart rate can regulate mine. I was in a full on panic attack one day - I am 27 and unmarried so I have to live at home, I'm too ill to live alone. But both parents work so I am alone most of the time. This panic attack hit out of no where about 20 mins before my mom had to go to work and she had just taken 12 days off for my hospital stay. And my dad was at work. Somehow Jeffrey knew he was the only one to pull me out of it. I'm used to the ways he will move my hand away from where I'm holding my stomach so he can press against me, or when his 60 lb self crawls ontop of me on the couch that isn't big enough to fit comfortably. But he will lay ontop of me and the warmth and pressure helps, and he tucks his head into my neck and naps... As relief comes he wakes and gets down like he knows, he does know. But this panic attack, what he did was all different. Australian cattle dogs are also known as red or blue heelers. He's a red heeler (I think it's appropriate, because my heeler is my "healer" lol) he tends to heard children and really everyone like cattle, it's in his blood. During this panick attack I couldn't breath and was sweating, it was awful. My mom was sitting on my bed next to me trying to coach my breathing.... He jumped up on the bed and forceably pushed her away from me - her first response was to tell him to get down - he wouldn't. I said the only words I could get out and told her let him be we've seen what he does for me for pain. So she moved aside. He sniffed and he put his torso on mine, heart to heart..... Within minutes my heart rate started to lower... I was coming out of it, be then moved and he put his neck across my neck, where my aortic vein was pulsing, his heart rate calmed me even more. My mom was going to be late, I was out of my dark hole and had my dog, I told her to go. She told her boss the deal when she got to work and said she needs her phone on until I'm completely ok - she was in retail. Everyone she worked with knew about me and she never had issues. I didn't text her for two hours as I couldn't reach my phone, my dog stayed in the same position for two hours because I was still very anxious. I fell asleep finally, when I woke he was "the little spoon" and I felt better. I have no doubt that dogs help IBD patients. When I'm in the hospital or traveling on a plane to visit family is when I wish he was certified and could be with me. I would never put him on a plane in cargo unless necessary like if I were moving and flying to a new state and a truck transporting my belongings.

I'm sure even adopting an older dog and forming a bond that he'd be just as capable as I raised my pup.
08-18-2017, 10:46 PM   #49
Helenmm
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
I have a pitbull/lab/boxer/bird dog mix. Rescue dog, loves everyone & the attention. I call her my lil furry nurse, my fiance' and I un-knowingly trained her to be a service dog for me when I have a Crohn's flare up, asthma attack, when I fall, or just have nerve pain. It started with just having her lay with me when I was too sick to function & she would always have her head on my chest or shoulder with at least one paw touching me. For a few years my fiance' got into the habit as well to put her in bed with me when I didn't feel well, we started noticing her doing it on her own w/o being told & as we put she would assume her position in the bed then snuggle up to me. I taught her to help me when I fall & this was completely by accident, I fell while home alone while having terrible spasms in my legs & of course only person around was my dog, I called her over and asked her to brace and she actually did, now if I'm on the floor even if not hurt she will run to me and brace for me. I have fallen in the shower and she cried and howled outside the bathroom door until my fiance' came in & found me on the floor of the shower. Now that we know how to read her, she even tells us when I am going to have a flare, she follows me every where, can't be distracted by any one or anything - including treats and a ride in the truck, her ears will pin straight back & she will either sit and stair at me or rest her head on my legs & look at me.
My Lilly is so loving & attention hogger that she is always very excited to see people, but when her momma is sick she don't want them.
I've also used Lilly for therapy for a cousins daughter who was petrified of dogs for no reason, surprisingly Lilly would just sit & wait for her to come to her when normally Lilly would be bumb rushing people for attention. Even after my cousin got use to her Lilly would still wait for her to touch her, but watch her very closely wagging her tail waiting to be patted.
I think the loving, caring & nurturing nature is pure instinct for most dogs & doesn't exactly need expensive training to teach them the basics.
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Crohn's Disease Forum » Support Forum » Does anyone have a service dog for Crohn's?
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