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05-29-2013, 11:40 AM   #31
David
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Even though I am not 100% sure that it is to nickel that I react for me it can take a while... Like I can generally wear my jewel during the winter without having issues but anytime it get more humid I'm getting blisters because it allows it to leech I suppose. When it happened last month I switched my ring to another finger and it took about a week before it happened again. I don't know if it's the time it took before It got moist long enough or it's the time for the reaction itself... I think Ill switch to wood lol. Its safer!
Now THIS is interesting to me. A large percentage of people are definitely allergic to nickel and then there may be people like you were the allergy only presents under certain circumstances.

My theory is that magnesium deficiency in the face of nickel over-exposure is the key.
06-04-2013, 02:44 AM   #32
SarahD
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It looks like those of us in the UK have another source of nickel to contend with, though I'm not sure if it'll really be a big problem as I expect exposure time will be small unless you handle money a lot (e.g. cashiers, bankers etc).

A short article about it can be found here.

I'm not sure if you need a log-in to access the paper (I'm at work so automatically get access to a lot of journals), but here it is.

David, have you come across anything that suggests whether we should just be concerned about dietary sources of nickel in relation to IBD or is it possible that skin contact with nickel could also influence IBD? The news coverage this morning suggested that moisturising your skin would help to prevent the nickel exposure and subsequent allergic reactions by forming a barrier between the skin and the nickel particles. I wonder if the same would be possible in the gut, something like slippery elm maybe which becomes a gel-like substance when mixed with water and coats the gut wall.
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Symptoms from the age of 12. Mis-diagnosed with UC at the age of 13, and later diagnosed with Crohn's in January 2012 at 24 years old. Disease mainly in terminal ileum.


Current meds:
Azathioprine, Allopurinol, Calcichew D3-Forte, Fortijuice, Alendronic acid, Ranitidine

Previous meds:
Augmentin, Doxycycline, Lansoprazole, Asacol, Pentasa, Prednisolone, Entocort, Cipro, Flagyl, Elemental Extra 028
06-04-2013, 04:48 AM   #33
Soybean
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I'm allergic to nickel aswell. I don't wear jewellery often cos most of my stuff is costume jewellery, and it causes me to come out in a blistery rash. If I have to wear rings I usually coat them with clear nail varnish first to put a barrier between my skin and the metal. Interesting about the white gold having nickel in it, cos my engagement ring is white gold, and I no longer wear it due to the blistery rash it causes if I leave it on over night.
06-15-2013, 09:10 PM   #34
David
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Like I can generally wear my jewel during the winter without having issues but anytime it get more humid I'm getting blisters because it allows it to leech I suppose.
What you mentioned here really stuck in my mind and I've been wondering if I might come across an answer. I think I have:

Among metals, nickel in alloys is ionized by sweat on the surface of the skin and exhibits particularly marked irritancy and allergenicity.
Source
06-15-2013, 09:16 PM   #35
David
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Our nickel poll doesn't have a ton of responses, but at least 40% have Crohn's and ARE known to be allergic to nickel and I'm guessing some of those who don't know are also allergic or have problems when their magnesium levels drop below a certain point.
06-15-2013, 09:18 PM   #36
David
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David, have you come across anything that suggests whether we should just be concerned about dietary sources of nickel in relation to IBD or is it possible that skin contact with nickel could also influence IBD? The news coverage this morning suggested that moisturising your skin would help to prevent the nickel exposure and subsequent allergic reactions by forming a barrier between the skin and the nickel particles. I wonder if the same would be possible in the gut, something like slippery elm maybe which becomes a gel-like substance when mixed with water and coats the gut wall.
I'm slowly compiling the evidence but I believe that nickel exposure actually causes some forms of Crohn's disease. So if I'm right, the answer to your question is a definite YES. There is of course a very high chance I'm wrong.

In regards to your thought about slippery elm, in my opinion, the key is magnesium. If you have sufficient magnesium levels (not just serum magnesium), it may stop or at least lessen the impact of the nickel.
06-17-2013, 09:07 AM   #37
levi
 
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Hmm...this is an interesting connection: I experienced my first symptoms soon after being cut to the bone in my leg by a piece of stainless steel (about 10 pc nickel content)
06-17-2013, 10:03 PM   #38
kiny
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I'm slowly compiling the evidence but I believe that nickel exposure actually causes some forms of Crohn's disease. So if I'm right, the answer to your question is a definite YES. There is of course a very high chance I'm wrong.
I posted the Titanium dioxide studies because the only thing that makes sense to me is that whatever is causing crohn's disease has managed to enter tissue. Either an antigen like a metal, or a pathogen like AIEC or MAP. I do not believe it is a reaction against the indigenous flora, that doesn't explain the skip lesions, or the transmural nature, or the fistula. Something is causing an immune response and whatever it is, it managed to attach against or enter the gut wall.
06-28-2013, 06:05 PM   #39
crohnsinct
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Yikes! Wonder if O's vegetarian diet has anything to do with her Crohns or her widespread Psoriasis...they say it is Remicade induced psoriasis but maybe they are wrong. I don't know if I can move her to a low nickel diet. Can they test for magnesium levels? I just got them to check her b12 and got them to run the "right" test. In 5 weeks she goes back for next infusion and I will ask about magnesium testing. Going to search the forum for that now
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Daughter O dx 2/1/12 at age 12
Crohns & Remicade induced Psoriasis
Remicade
Methotrexate (12.5mg wkly - oral)
Vit d 2000IU
Multi vitamin plus iron
Calcium
Folic Acid
Previously used - Prednisone, Prevacid, Enteral Nutrition

Daughter T dx 1/2/15 at age 11
Vitaligo, Precoscious puberty & Crohns
Methotrexate (15mg weekly oral)
Enteral Nutrition
Entocort
IBD-AID Diet
Vit d 1000IU
Calcium
Folic Acid
Previously used: Mtx injections

Last edited by crohnsinct; 06-28-2013 at 07:23 PM.
06-28-2013, 07:19 PM   #40
Amy2
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Daughter without Crohn's is allergic to nickel, son with Crohn's could be, but he's never worn any.
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06-29-2013, 12:32 AM   #41
CarolinAlaska
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Very interesting food for thought. My girls and I are all sensitive to nickel, but I thought that nickel was just a common allergy in the general population... My girls and I all have GI symptoms as well, but only one of us has IBD diagnosis so far...
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Osteoporosis, Scoliosis, EDS, Asthma, Lymphedema, Epilepsy, Hla B-27 positive, gluten intolerant, thrombophlebitis, c.diff, depression, anxiety postural tachycardia/POTS and multiple food allergies.
06-29-2013, 10:06 AM   #42
Trysha
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Our nickel poll doesn't have a ton of responses, but at least 40% have Crohn's and ARE known to be allergic to nickel and I'm guessing some of those who don't know are also allergic or have problems when their magnesium levels drop below a certain point.
Just found the poll by chance David
I am very sensitive to nickle and my crohn's dates back to that first reaction
occasioned by a necklace containing nickel.
The rash was very blistery and needed medical attention. I was a very healthy individual at the time.
Subsequent to that months followed and then (unrecognised at the time) crohn's symptoms., diagnosed at that time as IBS.Lots of GI problems.
Took years before the crohn's was defined.,and diagnosed by the third GI in my life.
Cheers!
Trysha
07-31-2013, 04:51 AM   #43
David
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Some patients affected by nickel-contact allergy present digestive symptoms in addition to systemic cutaneous manifestations, falling under the condition known as systemic nickel allergy syndrome (SNAS). A nickel-related pro-inflammatory status has been documented at intestinal mucosal level. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence of lactose intolerance in patients affected by SNAS compared to a healthy population. Consecutive patients affected by SNAS referring to our departments were enrolled. The control population consisted of healthy subjects without gastrointestinal symptoms. All subjects enrolled underwent lactose breath test under standard conditions. One hundred and seventy-eight SNAS patients and 60 healthy controls were enrolled. Positivity of lactose breath test occurred in 74.7% of the SNAS group compared to 6.6% of the control group. Lactose intolerance is highly prevalent in our series of patients affected by SNAS. Based on our preliminary results, we can hypothesize that in SNAS patients, the nickel-induced pro-inflammatory status could temporarily impair the brush border enzymatic functions, resulting in hypolactasia. Further trials evaluating the effect of a nickel-low diet regimen on lactase activity, histological features and immunological pattern are needed.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21658331
08-08-2014, 01:39 PM   #44
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I had a full battery of metal Allergy tests,, both on my back and through the Melisa foundation....
Some of the metals I am allergic to is, Nickel, surgical stainless steel, titanium,Silver, Cobalt, a number of different kinds of mercury, but not all of them.

I am ok with Copper and Aluminium.

I can't cook with pots and Pans with Nickel in them... No Jewelry....
I had to replace my wedding ring with a simple stone ring.... I can wear the fresh water pearls, DH bought me oh so long ago. Nothing else is safe.
Have to be careful.

My Allergist says it only gets worse as we get older. sigh ~~

Have a three page list of foods high in nickel... ad the Colitis, no cow dairy and a diet with 800 to 1000mg of salt a day max... makes it rather hard to eat well.

One reason I have been looking into Hydroponics... maybe I could find a way to grow my favorite veggies... and not have them up take nickel?

Anyway....

About 4 months ago, I ended up in the Hospital. General Colitis... but both my Doc and I, think it was triggered by the Clindamycin. I took 30 days of that... and all my symptoms were classic to that class of drug.

Wonder if the Nickel allergy made it worse? Have never had a problem with my intestines, until that hospital visit. Turned 50 this year.
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