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Crohn's Disease Forum » Diet, Fitness, and Supplements » Low Fiber/Residue Diet Support Group


 
01-06-2014, 11:48 AM   #91
UnXmas
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Hope it went ok for you! I'm not risking trying beans. I never liked baked beans much anyway. I wouldn't mind being able to eat green beans again though.
01-27-2014, 08:25 AM   #92
Josephine
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Just started residue diet today, due wait for phone back.
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Acid Reflux for 15 years med

Sacroiliitis and add to grew list auto immune diseases.

Now on Lansprazole 15 mg And Gavin son 5mg-10mg 3a day.

Crohns from Oct 2007
Domperidone 10 mg -20 mg, Mebeverine 135 mg,
3 a day.
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Azathioprine is not working, still waiting to find out what next. Still on low dosage Prednisolone

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English my native language and have characterizes of dyslexia.
01-27-2014, 01:20 PM   #93
mccindy
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Hope it went ok for you! I'm not risking trying beans. I never liked baked beans much anyway. I wouldn't mind being able to eat green beans again though.


Oh, I miss baked beans. I always did like them. I miss eating chili too, but can't because of the beans. Darn things. i can eat green beans, though, which is good because they are yummy. Wish I could eat fresh asparagus and brussels sprouts though!
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current diagnosis is undiagnosed (possible Celiac disease)

Colonoscopy done August 2013, no evidence of Crohn's seen, biopsies done and one polyp removed.
Polyp is precancerous adenoma

(Diagnosed with a diffuse astrocytoma (brain tumor) 5/31/13.
Craniotomy with tumor resection performed July 2013. 99% of WHO grade II diffuse astrocytoma removed, MRI scheduled every 6 months to monitor for regrowth.)
01-27-2014, 11:02 PM   #94
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I swear by the low residue diet... and even though I received surgery a few weeks ago... will most likely continue it. I have been on it for probably 6-7 years, and it does really help and make me feel better than foods that are high in fiber/greasy. As I usually tell people, it is the "middle of the road" diet... nothing too healthy, nothing too unhealthy. Of course, I need a properly working medicine to calm my disease down and put me in remission... this diet just makes me better in regards to day to day....

I think the huge thing with this disease though, and what I am learning, is that diets will widely vary person to person. Some people are so gun hoe about the SCD diet that it really irritates me when they believe it will work for everyone. I believe the same for this too (that it is very individual)... and luckily this is a diet IMO that is less restrictive and more my kind of diet (a comfort food diet) than the others.

Baked Beans, actually, seem to be alright for me to eat no matter what... and I really like them during summer grilling, so that is one thing I am happy about....
01-28-2014, 09:02 AM   #95
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I swear by the low residue diet... and even though I received surgery a few weeks ago... will most likely continue it. I have been on it for probably 6-7 years, and it does really help and make me feel better than foods that are high in fiber/greasy. As I usually tell people, it is the "middle of the road" diet... nothing too healthy, nothing too unhealthy. Of course, I need a properly working medicine to calm my disease down and put me in remission... this diet just makes me better in regards to day to day....

I think the huge thing with this disease though, and what I am learning, is that diets will widely vary person to person. Some people are so gun hoe about the SCD diet that it really irritates me when they believe it will work for everyone. I believe the same for this too (that it is very individual)... and luckily this is a diet IMO that is less restrictive and more my kind of diet (a comfort food diet) than the others.

Baked Beans, actually, seem to be alright for me to eat no matter what... and I really like them during summer grilling, so that is one thing I am happy about....
I've been relatively low fibre for years, but since my ileostomy and subsequent blockage the moment I eat even small amounts of fibre, I'm strictly low-fibre, low-residue to the extreme now. It seems kind of unhealthy to me though, in terms of the mainstream idea of healthy eating. Specifically the 5-a-day rule (five portions of different fruits and veg a day, not including potatoes). I can only tolerate bananas, tinned fruit and juice now, and deviating from that doesn't mean I just feel bad, like it would pre-ileostomy, it lands me in hospital. So clearly fruits and vegetables are not healthy for me. But the government has so forcefully pushed the "5-a-day" rule that the complete lack of greenery and fresh stuff in my diet, plus no whole-grains, nuts or seeds, plus a lot of high-calorie (i.e. junk) foods because I need to gain weight, and complete lack of exercise also due to health issues, I don't feel like I'm living very healthily!

I get annoyed with people who push alternative diets too, primarily because I tried many alternative diets trying to heal myself (and I mean really tried, sticking 100% and for long periods of time) and only got sicker. And found the nutritionists and alternative health practitioners who advised me on these diets seemed to become very annoyed and disappear (with my money) when I told them it wasn't working.

I need scientific proof of diets (or any therapy), and most of those claimed to help with Crohn's don't have that. The mainstream medical approach, from what I've seen, advocates the low-fibre/low-residue and "soft" diets, which are supported by solid evidence, and my own personal experiences have backed up my faith that these can in some cases be helpful. The fact that mainstream medicine doesn't present this diet as a complete cure, doesn't usually expect 100% adherence and doesn't present the dietary advice with such a forceful moral message as many of the alternative diets often do sits well with me too. The fact that the first time I tried any food which conventional medical advice warns as those which potentially cause blockages for ileostomy patients I got a blockage (more than once), and that since avoiding any of these high-risk foods I've had no blockages, convinces me.

Btw. apparently soon fruit juice won't be counted as one of the 5-a-day because it contains too much sugar.
01-28-2014, 10:52 AM   #96
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I totally understand the "five a day" thing myself... and like you, stick to canned fruit if I eat any fruit at all. I guess I have just become accustomed to this diet, and my nutrient levels have remained relatively healthy for the last year or so... so I figure I shouldn't mess with what seems to be working.

I have tried cutting things out of my diet, and like you... ended up worse off (or even in the hospital as I wasn't getting enough fluid or enough nutrients and ended up on TPN). This is why when people tell me "go on this, you won't need these meds anymore" irritates me. When I am on something that works... why mess with it?

In regards to my disease, Tysabri seems to be working, as my inflammation levels have dropped and nutrients/vitamins have stablized. However, I had at least three strictures in my intestines that caused me to have partial obstructions and I strongly believe the medicine couldn't rid itself of this due to it being scarred... so I think that now that they are out, starting with my next infusion... hopefully it will put me in remission. That is my ultimate hope...
01-28-2014, 11:44 AM   #97
mccindy
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I've been relatively low fibre for years, but since my ileostomy and subsequent blockage the moment I eat even small amounts of fibre, I'm strictly low-fibre, low-residue to the extreme now. It seems kind of unhealthy to me though, in terms of the mainstream idea of healthy eating. Specifically the 5-a-day rule (five portions of different fruits and veg a day, not including potatoes). I can only tolerate bananas, tinned fruit and juice now, and deviating from that doesn't mean I just feel bad, like it would pre-ileostomy, it lands me in hospital. So clearly fruits and vegetables are not healthy for me. But the government has so forcefully pushed the "5-a-day" rule that the complete lack of greenery and fresh stuff in my diet, plus no whole-grains, nuts or seeds, plus a lot of high-calorie (i.e. junk) foods because I need to gain weight, and complete lack of exercise also due to health issues, I don't feel like I'm living very healthily!

I get annoyed with people who push alternative diets too, primarily because I tried many alternative diets trying to heal myself (and I mean really tried, sticking 100% and for long periods of time) and only got sicker. And found the nutritionists and alternative health practitioners who advised me on these diets seemed to become very annoyed and disappear (with my money) when I told them it wasn't working.

I need scientific proof of diets (or any therapy), and most of those claimed to help with Crohn's don't have that. The mainstream medical approach, from what I've seen, advocates the low-fibre/low-residue and "soft" diets, which are supported by solid evidence, and my own personal experiences have backed up my faith that these can in some cases be helpful. The fact that mainstream medicine doesn't present this diet as a complete cure, doesn't usually expect 100% adherence and doesn't present the dietary advice with such a forceful moral message as many of the alternative diets often do sits well with me too. The fact that the first time I tried any food which conventional medical advice warns as those which potentially cause blockages for ileostomy patients I got a blockage (more than once), and that since avoiding any of these high-risk foods I've had no blockages, convinces me.

Btw. apparently soon fruit juice won't be counted as one of the 5-a-day because it contains too much sugar.
Have you thought about making your own juice? YOu won't get the fiber but you'll still get all the nutrients and calories. My son and his wife bought a juicer and joined an organic veggie/fruit delivery service. They use a combination of vegetables and fruits and make their own juice every morning in place of breakfast. They get multiple servings of some very healthy fruits and veggies that way with no added sugar. They use kale pretty much every day.
01-29-2014, 06:38 AM   #98
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Have you thought about making your own juice? YOu won't get the fiber but you'll still get all the nutrients and calories. My son and his wife bought a juicer and joined an organic veggie/fruit delivery service. They use a combination of vegetables and fruits and make their own juice every morning in place of breakfast. They get multiple servings of some very healthy fruits and veggies that way with no added sugar. They use kale pretty much every day.
I have, but I wasn't sure that it would be any more beneficial than bought juices - finding juices with no added sugar doesn't seem to be a problem where I live. (The government's move to exclude juices from the dietary guidelines includes the natural sugar in fruit juice, not just added.)
01-29-2014, 09:13 AM   #99
mccindy
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The government is stupid. There, I said it.
01-29-2014, 02:59 PM   #100
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Not all of the government moves are good because it's hard to apply a generalization. For example I think there was a push to get the cereal manufactures to switch to whole wheat, whole oat etc. that's great because it's important people eat healthier but what about those of us on low fiber diets? I can't find any cereal that isn't full of fiber or whole this or that.
01-30-2014, 05:33 AM   #101
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Not all of the government moves are good because it's hard to apply a generalization. For example I think there was a push to get the cereal manufactures to switch to whole wheat, whole oat etc. that's great because it's important people eat healthier but what about those of us on low fiber diets? I can't find any cereal that isn't full of fiber or whole this or that.
I've though this too, when there have been proposals talked about in the media to put extra taxes on junk food. I wonder if I shouldn't get a discount if that happens, since I need all the calories I can get. I do find breakfast cereals quite limited because I need low fibre, but I have a bit of choice - Cornflakes, Special K, Rice Krispies and various supermarket-brands of the same cereals.
01-30-2014, 07:44 AM   #102
Josephine
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Please can someone explain what the term 'Hard Meat' mean?
01-30-2014, 04:14 PM   #103
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Wouldn't "hard meat" mean stuff that is harder to digest, like steaks (especially tougher ones) and such? I typically stay to ground beef if I eat red meat... but mainly eat chicken as that is easier for me to digest.
01-30-2014, 05:25 PM   #104
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Wouldn't "hard meat" mean stuff that is harder to digest, like steaks (especially tougher ones) and such? I typically stay to ground beef if I eat red meat... but mainly eat chicken as that is easier for me to digest.
Thank you Silverdiskdj, I am formed a plan of action in my head of what I need buy and now I hope it work.

Last edited by Josephine; 01-31-2014 at 04:41 AM.
02-03-2014, 11:11 AM   #105
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Hi, I am new to the forum and was diagnosed with Crohns in 1989 and Fibromyalgia in 2007. I have never been in remission and have had 2 resections and 1 exploritory. I no longer have the ileosecal valve. It seems the older I get the less I can eat. I keep off meds as much as possible by excercising regularly and watching my diet. I do take trazodone to sleep but that is it. I just deal with symptoms as they come. What I am trying to do is go to a more vegetable diet along with protein bars. But I am finding the protein bars are really "stopping" me up. Which is almost as bad as having diarrhea 5 plus times a day. Plus I get very bloated because nothing is moving. The protein bars seem to be the only "food" that does this to me. Does anyone have any idea what could be in the bars that would affect me like this?
02-03-2014, 11:17 AM   #106
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Which protein bar are you using? Many of them are loaded with fiber so we would need to see the ingredients.
02-03-2014, 12:02 PM   #107
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Hi, I am new to the forum and was diagnosed with Crohns in 1989 and Fibromyalgia in 2007. I have never been in remission and have had 2 resections and 1 exploritory. I no longer have the ileosecal valve. It seems the older I get the less I can eat. I keep off meds as much as possible by excercising regularly and watching my diet. I do take trazodone to sleep but that is it. I just deal with symptoms as they come. What I am trying to do is go to a more vegetable diet along with protein bars. But I am finding the protein bars are really "stopping" me up. Which is almost as bad as having diarrhea 5 plus times a day. Plus I get very bloated because nothing is moving. The protein bars seem to be the only "food" that does this to me. Does anyone have any idea what could be in the bars that would affect me like this?
Are you on a low-fibre/low-residue diet? That could perhaps lead to constipation. Have you thought about trying any laxatives or stool softeners?

The protein bars - I agree with nogutsnoglory, it really depends on their ingredients and fibre content as to whether they could cause constipation.
02-21-2014, 11:49 PM   #108
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Hi Everyone. I'm new to this group, and on a low residue diet for the last two years because of a narrow area in my intestine. I'm not sure if it's scarring or inflammation. It was at the site where I had a resection about 25 years ago, so could be either. I've been on Remicade for about 6 months, but my latest colonoscopy showed that it's not helping the stenosis, so I'll probably be adding Imuran.

The main question I have (and I've asked it elsewhere on the forum, so I'm sorry if I'm being repetitive, but I keep reading different answers, so I thought maybe someone here would know for sure) is: Can we eat raw greens on a low residue diet if they're blended into a smoothie?

I'm trying to decide whether I should buy a juicer, or whether a blender would be enough. I realize that it would still retain fiber, but if it's blended really smooth, would that be safe? My husband is pushing for a blender because it's less expensive, but I don't want to do something that would risk blockage. I really want a juicer, but on the other hand, if I can manage the fiber in smooth form, maybe that would be healthier overall.
02-22-2014, 06:43 AM   #109
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Hi Everyone. I'm new to this group, and on a low residue diet for the last two years because of a narrow area in my intestine. I'm not sure if it's scarring or inflammation. It was at the site where I had a resection about 25 years ago, so could be either. I've been on Remicade for about 6 months, but my latest colonoscopy showed that it's not helping the stenosis, so I'll probably be adding Imuran.

The main question I have (and I've asked it elsewhere on the forum, so I'm sorry if I'm being repetitive, but I keep reading different answers, so I thought maybe someone here would know for sure) is: Can we eat raw greens on a low residue diet if they're blended into a smoothie?

I'm trying to decide whether I should buy a juicer, or whether a blender would be enough. I realize that it would still retain fiber, but if it's blended really smooth, would that be safe? My husband is pushing for a blender because it's less expensive, but I don't want to do something that would risk blockage. I really want a juicer, but on the other hand, if I can manage the fiber in smooth form, maybe that would be healthier overall.
I suspect the reason you get different answers is because it's different for everyone! What specifically do you mean by raw greens? Lettuce? (Sorry, I think the terminology for quite a few veg is different in the UK from the US.)

I used to be able to tolerate lettuce, cucumber, etc. raw as long as I kept it to small amounts - I didn't even need to blend it. However, now I have an ileostomy and it gets blocked at the slightest thing. I can't have anything like that now, no matter how well it's blended. Since you have narrowing of the intestine, I think you should also err on the side of caution here, as that sounds similar to the problem I have with my stoma - the stoma opening is too small.

I don't have a juicer, but I have a blender and I use it for cooked veg like sprouts, broccoli and a few other things. One thing I have found useful is, after blending vegetables, I put them in a sieve and mash them through with a fork. Whatever makes it through the sieve I eat, anything that doesn't, I leave. Again, this is only since the ileostomy.

So really you have to experiment to see what's ok for you, but if you are risking actual blockage, rather than just a temporary deterioration in symptoms, you may not want to experiment too far. Before the ileostomy, I ate moderately low-fibre and I knew that if I ate too much it would just cause me to feel uncomfortable and make the diarrhoea worse, but it was more the overall amount of fibre I consumed over consecutive days that was significant rather than any particular food. Now with the ileostomy I am strictly low-fibre, as eating it causes a blockage. The quantity of fibre eaten is still an important factor, but the foods most likely to cause blockages (some veg - in particular lettuce, cucumber, and other salads, - fruit skin, pips, seeds, nuts, dried fruit) I avoid altogether because even a small amount is a risk.

Have you had problems with fibre already and how severe were they? Knowing your levels of tolerance will help you know if it's worth experimenting with a blender, but since you have narrowing, I would suggest the juicer would be safer, especially if you've already found small amounts of fibre to give you problems.
02-22-2014, 04:39 PM   #110
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I have a Blendtec blender that I love dearly. I'm new to Crohn's so I'm getting a lot of advice. Someone just recommended a Hurom masticating juicer that let's you let a little fiber in. It's the most expensive juicer I've seen but being able to control the fiber seems nice. It was on Williams-Sonoma.


02-22-2014, 11:40 PM   #111
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I suspect the reason you get different answers is because it's different for everyone! What specifically do you mean by raw greens? Lettuce? (Sorry, I think the terminology for quite a few veg is different in the UK from the US.)

I used to be able to tolerate lettuce, cucumber, etc. raw as long as I kept it to small amounts - I didn't even need to blend it. However, now I have an ileostomy and it gets blocked at the slightest thing. I can't have anything like that now, no matter how well it's blended. Since you have narrowing of the intestine, I think you should also err on the side of caution here, as that sounds similar to the problem I have with my stoma - the stoma opening is too small.

I don't have a juicer, but I have a blender and I use it for cooked veg like sprouts, broccoli and a few other things. One thing I have found useful is, after blending vegetables, I put them in a sieve and mash them through with a fork. Whatever makes it through the sieve I eat, anything that doesn't, I leave. Again, this is only since the ileostomy.

So really you have to experiment to see what's ok for you, but if you are risking actual blockage, rather than just a temporary deterioration in symptoms, you may not want to experiment too far. Before the ileostomy, I ate moderately low-fibre and I knew that if I ate too much it would just cause me to feel uncomfortable and make the diarrhoea worse, but it was more the overall amount of fibre I consumed over consecutive days that was significant rather than any particular food. Now with the ileostomy I am strictly low-fibre, as eating it causes a blockage. The quantity of fibre eaten is still an important factor, but the foods most likely to cause blockages (some veg - in particular lettuce, cucumber, and other salads, - fruit skin, pips, seeds, nuts, dried fruit) I avoid altogether because even a small amount is a risk.

Have you had problems with fibre already and how severe were they? Knowing your levels of tolerance will help you know if it's worth experimenting with a blender, but since you have narrowing, I would suggest the juicer would be safer, especially if you've already found small amounts of fibre to give you problems.
Thanks for your reply UnXmas! I haven't really noticed problems before with fiber specifically but was told by my doctor to not eat raw vegetables, nuts and seeds because of the narrowing in my intestines. She said that would help me avoid blockage and surgery. If I was to just eat what agrees with me, I would probably be able to handle a lot of those foods, but I certainly don't want to risk blockage. It seems like a smoothie should be okay, because other chewed up food I eat makes it through, but I just don't understand how the body processes fiber that is in the form of smoothies, and it sounds like it still might be too risky. I guess I'm trying to get around the fiber restriction, but probably shouldn't risk it.
02-23-2014, 06:46 AM   #112
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Thanks for your reply UnXmas! I haven't really noticed problems before with fiber specifically but was told by my doctor to not eat raw vegetables, nuts and seeds because of the narrowing in my intestines. She said that would help me avoid blockage and surgery. If I was to just eat what agrees with me, I would probably be able to handle a lot of those foods, but I certainly don't want to risk blockage. It seems like a smoothie should be okay, because other chewed up food I eat makes it through, but I just don't understand how the body processes fiber that is in the form of smoothies, and it sounds like it still might be too risky. I guess I'm trying to get around the fiber restriction, but probably shouldn't risk it.
Although we are always getting messages about fibre being healthy, such advice is aimed at the general population, and doesn't hold true for those of us who are so far from the average, healthy digestive system. You can get all the vitamins you need without raw veg - maybe a supplement or vitamin pill would provide you with reassurance you are getting all you need.

If you've not been getting symptoms from other foods with fibre, raw veg might be ok, but it's sensible not to risk it if you're at all uncertain.

I don't know much about how the body processes different types of fibre either - it is confusing at times! I know, however, that when I first tried eating fibrous foods after my ileostomy surgery, there were clearly visible differences in the stoma output. Sorry to be graphic, but my stoma output is usually smooth; when I eat anything with fibre, the output contains little hard bits, like it's full of gravel. It was so obvious that my body was just not breaking down fibre at all, even though I'd chewed everything really well, and these unbroken bits can clump together and block the stoma. After one blockage and two further attempts to try fibre which, although I didn't eat enough to cause a complete blockage, did lead to stomach cramps and more gravel-like output which hurt as it came through the stoma, I gave up experimenting and now eat strictly low-fibre, low-residue and my stoma output is always smooth.

I know our problems are different as narrowed intestine is not the same as a stoma, but there is clearly something about fibre that means it isn't processed by our bodies as other food is, and even blended and chewed it can form into clumps and block narrow spaces.

Last edited by UnXmas; 02-24-2014 at 05:04 AM.
02-23-2014, 02:45 PM   #113
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Thank you UnXmas. That helps a lot. Your explanation makes a lot of sense, and I hear ya. I think I'll play it safe and go for a juicer when I can afford it. Thanks also for the assurance about not eating raw veg. That has been stressing me out a little bit, because I feel like I must be depriving my body terribly, but I do take vitamins and supplements, and eat cooked veggies, so hopefully that is enough. I do feel better overall since going on the low residue diet, it's just been confusing because I also eliminated a few other things that were causing problems, like coffee, so I'm never quite sure what it is that has helped the most.

The other reason I've been worrying was I just have the narrowing in this one spot, (the ileum where I had a resection), plus now two fistulas. But the rest of my system, what's left of it, is healthy looking. So I was worried I'd be hurting the healthy parts and causing those to deteriorate without fiber, in an effort to save the damaged parts. I realize that's just how it will have to be though, because doing further damage to the bad parts could kill me, and the healthy parts have withstood the low fiber diet now for over a year and haven't deteriorated.

Thanks for all your advice and sharing your experience.
02-24-2014, 05:23 AM   #114
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I think you've got it exactly - it's about weighing up the different risks and benefits. By not eating much fibre, you may miss out on some optimum health benefits that you'd otherwise have, but the risk of a blockage probably makes that a worthwhile sacrifice to make.
04-12-2014, 10:50 AM   #115
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How are you guys with tortilla chips? I have avoided them for years because it's corn based, hard and rough but it's listed as low fiber.

I have had it a few times now because I love nachos and cheese and I have episodes of pain and times I felt fine. This is still questionable yet exciting for me to possibly incorporate.
04-12-2014, 12:31 PM   #116
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I have little trouble with the chips. It seems the cheese or salsa do me in. So I avoid most of the time. I occasionally indulge right after infusion. I have about a ten day window then when I can have some items I'd normally pay for.


08-05-2014, 08:16 AM   #117
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Hi,
Just a quick question. At what point did your doctors tell you to being trying to normalize your diets?
I would ask my doctor but I have a sneaking suspicion that he really doesn't know much about Crohn's given the previous information and recommendations he's given me. (Primarily telling me it's ok to have salads and fruits but to avoid dairy and cabbage.)

Anyway, just looking to more info as I enter my second month of low res/low fiber dieting.
08-05-2014, 11:26 PM   #118
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Jaron I think each of us differs and you just have to experiment to find out what you can tolerate. According to my GI doctor, it's not the diet per se, but what causes irritation and inflammation for you. I was eating a very restricted diet and still ended up in the hospital. I have only recently gotten to where I can eat any fresh fruits and fresh vegetables. I still am very limited on proteins, mainly very well ground turkey, hot dogs and fish. It took nearly two years and monthly Remicade treatment to get here.
08-05-2014, 11:44 PM   #119
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I've been low residue since Feb and am just introducing fruits & veggies. Am I probably correct in assuming this is why I'm
having reflux/heartburn sometimes? I've been off heartburn meds all summer and now might need them again?
08-05-2014, 11:49 PM   #120
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Hi,
Just a quick question. At what point did your doctors tell you to being trying to normalize your diets?
I would ask my doctor but I have a sneaking suspicion that he really doesn't know much about Crohn's given the previous information and recommendations he's given me. (Primarily telling me it's ok to have salads and fruits but to avoid dairy and cabbage.)

Anyway, just looking to more info as I enter my second month of low res/low fiber dieting.
The low residue diet is supposed to be temporary, not a life long diet. After my first 2 Remicade infusions, I asked if I could eat more fruits/veggies or wheat bread and I was told I could and to pretty much play around with different foods. Just don't do a bunch of foods at once, try one thing at a time for about 2-3 days, before adding something else.

When I started to incorporate more fruits/veggies, I put them in a smoothie to see if my body could tolerate them better. Funny thing is, I've been making these smoothies since May with blueberries in them, I just tried eating blueberries outside of a smoothie and I had an issue, so my belly isn't a fan of whole blueberries. I also don't do well with processed, greasy meats, like pepperoni & sausage.

It's different for everyone and it's good to eventually start to branch out. I'm more about trying out fruits/veggies, I have yet to experiment with oats, granola and nuts. I'm dying for a salad too, but the most I do right now with lettuce, is putting a few pieces on a sandwich/sub. Are you not seeing a GI for your Crohn's?
__________________
Carrie

Diagnosed with Crohn's Disease - January 2014
Verified Crohn's Colitis - April 2014

Current Meds: Cimzia
Azulfidine (for joint pain)

Past Meds: Remicade, 6MP, Pentasa

Supplements: Calcium, D3, B12, Folic Acid, Probiotics


Blog: http://imacrohnie.tumblr.com/
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Crohn's Disease Forum » Diet, Fitness, and Supplements » Low Fiber/Residue Diet Support Group
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