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10-31-2013, 10:42 PM   #91
Searchingforhealth
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Thank you everyone for this informative forum on FMT. My 20 year old daughter was diagnosed with IBD in May. She was just in the hospital for 10 days with a severe C-dif infection that caused her to have a bad flare. She is currently on Vancomycin and Flagyl as well as 40 mg of Pred. Her new GI has aggreed to perform a FMT. I hope it is successful in knocking out the C-dif and her UC. He will be putting donor fecal material in her colon via a colonoscopy. Does this work as well as poop pills?
10-31-2013, 11:19 PM   #92
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Too bad that article is written so poorly, a lot of inaccurate terminology and words used, but the more to the point, atleast it's another win for fmt
11-01-2013, 12:19 PM   #93
kss
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wildbill, did you ever see the research I did using Crohnology's FMT users? There are not only 6 participants but I also included links for a couple of others I found with vidoes on youtube. And 3 of the 6 had UC.
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11-01-2013, 06:19 PM   #94
wildbill_52280
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Thank you everyone for this informative forum on FMT. My 20 year old daughter was diagnosed with IBD in May. She was just in the hospital for 10 days with a severe C-dif infection that caused her to have a bad flare. She is currently on Vancomycin and Flagyl as well as 40 mg of Pred. Her new GI has aggreed to perform a FMT. I hope it is successful in knocking out the C-dif and her UC. He will be putting donor fecal material in her colon via a colonoscopy. Does this work as well as poop pills?
typically repeated enemas are necessary to make a noticable difference in ibd. like 30-60 enemas sometimes to reach remission, but these are in the worst cases. some have had success with less enemas though. one colonoscopic FMT almost certainly will not be enough, and there is a recent study that even showed this not to be enough in UC.

they have not completed the development of a fecal transplant pill, but they have tried a prototype which was effective in eliminating c difficile.

Last edited by wildbill_52280; 11-02-2013 at 07:37 PM.
11-01-2013, 06:22 PM   #95
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wildbill, did you ever see the research I did using Crohnology's FMT users? There are not only 6 participants but I also included links for a couple of others I found with vidoes on youtube. And 3 of the 6 had UC.
yes i did see the article before and thought it was great. this time i decided to put a link to it in the first post of this thread in the first section of general information, but also mentioned there were more testimonys in the article as well, and a reference to your screenname.
11-06-2013, 10:51 PM   #96
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I found another study that is planned for fecal transplants in ulcerative colitis, that would total 10 studies planned so far, with 2 being completed already. 8 more to go from now until 2016.


the most recently completed study on crohn's using fecal transplants was actually estimated to be completed in december 2014, but i found the news releases stating the results. its possible that it will become easier to recruit people to do fecal transplant studies as time goes by and like the recent study, complete these studies early. i kind of hope thats the case.


http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/N...splant&rank=15
11-07-2013, 01:29 AM   #97
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can you post the results? were they promising?
11-07-2013, 03:29 PM   #98
wildbill_52280
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can you post the results? were they promising?
see post # 88 in this thread.
11-07-2013, 10:20 PM   #99
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its an article that says it helped kids with crohns but I couldn't find any results posted?
11-21-2013, 02:37 AM   #100
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just posting some info on a workshop that the FDA held earlier this year to help further the development of fecal transplants for many diseases, and encourage more research.

thought it would be nice to let everyone here know that things are moving in the right direction for this treatment so far.

http://www.fda.gov/biologicsbloodvac.../ucm341643.htm
11-22-2013, 01:36 AM   #101
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i just found another report of a person with crohn's treated successfully with a fecal transplant, in the medical journal titled The Journal of crohn's and colitis dated november 18 2013.

That would be the 4th official report of Fecal transplants being effective to treat crohn's disease.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24239403

http://www.ecco-jccjournal.org/
11-24-2013, 12:51 AM   #102
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Add us to the list of crohn's diagnosis after long term use of doxycycline used for acne but never worked.

Fecal transplant sounds so promising. I'm a donor-in-waiting!
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11-24-2013, 03:17 PM   #103
wildbill_52280
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Add us to the list of crohn's diagnosis after long term use of doxycycline used for acne but never worked.

Fecal transplant sounds so promising. I'm a donor-in-waiting!

you are correct, there is a link between doxycycline use for acne and development of crohn's. Another antibiotic that is linked is amoxicillin-clavulanic acid A.K.A. the brand name Augmentin.


American Journal of Gastroenterology August 2010.
http://www.nature.com/ajg/journal/va...g2010303a.html
11-26-2013, 12:32 AM   #104
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Here is some preliminary news of results of the study for fecal transplants on crohn's patients at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts. the study isn't expected to be done until april 2014 though, but they say so far patients are seeing good results. more info below.

http://www.wcvb.com/Sponsors/bethisr...?absolute=true
11-26-2013, 02:16 AM   #105
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11-26-2013, 12:45 PM   #106
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here it is again then.

Here is some preliminary news of results of the study for fecal transplants on crohn's patients at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts. the study isn't expected to be done until april 2014 though, but they say so far patients are seeing good results. more info below.


Fecal Transplant for Crohn's
Published 3:21 PM EST Nov 25, 2013




Text Size:AAA
There are lots of different types of transplants for lots of different medical conditions. One of the newest is called a fecal transplant, where the stool of a healthy individual is transferred to the intestines of a person with an intestinal disorder. This treatment has had proven success for clearing infections with Clostridium difficile, a powerful bacteria that is difficult to treat. The strategy is thought to revert the bacterial make-up of a person’s intestines to its normal state, with harmless bacteria displacing pathogenic ones.

A handful of doctors have tried the procedure in the clinic for various conditions such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, and numerous patients have tried home remedies using samples from family members or close friends. However, fecal transplants are still considered an investigational, or research, treatment, and it is unproven in patients with Crohn’s or ulcerative colitis.

Dr. Alan Moss, an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and his colleagues are currently conducting the first registered clinical trial that is testing the potential of fecal transplants in patients with Crohn’s disease. “Fecal transplants have certainly taken off in the last couple of years, and some doctors have anecdotally reported they’ve had success in treating Crohn’s disease this way. But we need clinical trial data to objectively test if it’s safe for these patients, and if it improves their condition,” he says. “There are a lot of unknowns in this field—whether fresh stool is better than frozen, which types of donors are associated with successful outcomes, which types of patients could respond etc.” This study is funded by a grant to the Harvard Institute of Translational Immunology from the Leona and Harry Helmsley Charitable Trust.

One of the patients in Dr. Moss’s trial, who wishes to remain anonymous, jumped at the chance to participate. “I’m against taking medicine since there can be many side effects, including unknown long term ones. I’ve been managing my disease with a very restrictive diet: unable to drink coffee or alcohol, eat salads, cheese, spicy foods, fried foods, chocolate, sugar, seeds, nuts...and these are just a few! The diet is so restrictive that it is difficult to maintain,” she says. “Once I was able to get over the gross details of the study, I became so intrigued by the process and excited about it.”

Pharmaceutical companies are also interested in fecal transplantation because if it’s successful, they might be able to isolate the active compounds in the therapy—such as important strains of bacteria or products of bacteria—that could be developed and commercialized. “Working with stool is cumbersome, to put it mildly,” says Dr. Moss. “So it might be easier to treat patients with only the key components of stool in a pre-packaged format.”

Dr. Moss notes that many people are trying fecal transplants at home with protocols they find online. “The most important thing to consider is the donor, who could carry unknown infections in their stool. A patient might feel safe with a donation from a spouse or other family member , but I really worry about people trusting strangers for untested donations outside of the clinical setting.” He even noted that some ads have been placed on Craigslist. “I certainly would discourage people from relying on home transplants using unscreened donor stool, because many viruses, bacteria, and parasites can be found in stool, ” he says. In clinical trials, donors undergo extensive health questionnaires and stool testing to reduce the risk of their stool harboring infections.

The patient in Dr. Moss’s trial is seeing good results so far. “I see this as a major breakthrough in medicine by treating patients naturally, and it makes perfect sense. I’ve been eating and drinking whatever I want, and the Crohn’s symptoms I typically would have at this time are either minimal or nonexistent—symptoms such as sharp pain in my colon, cramps, bleeding ulcers, lethargy, joint pain, and diarrhea.” She says she looks forward to the day when fecal transplants might be an affordable means of managing Crohn’s disease and perhaps other similar conditions.



Read more: http://www.wcvb.com/Sponsors/bethisr...#ixzz2lm61SuX6

Last edited by wildbill_52280; 12-06-2013 at 04:46 PM. Reason: typo's
11-30-2013, 04:26 PM   #107
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I found another testimony on this website of how a Fecal Transplant put them into a remission that posted earlier this year.

Here is a link - http://www.crohnsforum.com/showthread.php?t=48939

and a quote from the post-

Last Fall I went to Sydney Australia on a vacation and while I was there I looked into their programs and research. I found FMT. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation. I was grossed out and said oh hell no. Still, the more I studied and read the more it seemed worth a try. So, I called my doctor here and asked if I could be in one of the clinical studies. Unfortunately there wasn't one here. Only in Portland Oregon. He happened to know the doctor running the study though and offered me another way to treat myself at home. My husbands stool was tested for HIV, Hep A B and C, C Diff, and he passed all the tests with flying colors. So, we bought a retention nozzle, enema bag, tons of Zip lock freezer bags, went through training with our nurses so he could help me complete the series of enemas and my flora was checked and measured by my doctor every other week 7 days after each treatment. I was really sore down there from all the surgeries so instead of 7 days of back to back enemas we changed it to once every other week for 2 months.
I felt it was my last hope and I wanted to try something because nothing else seemed to work and I just wanted to become a guinea pig if I could. 4 months after my (home treatment) I went in for a scope, except some scarring from the past issues I had no inflammation, no diarrhea, no pain, and had started to work out again. I have felt better this past year than I have since I was 26. I have my life back! I have not been on any meds for 6 mos and after my scope today I was told I was in complete remission. (They still don't know how long it may last or if it will.) Right now I feel normal, no pain, no D and I have energy again!

Last edited by wildbill_52280; 12-01-2013 at 03:52 AM.
12-02-2013, 12:23 PM   #108
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here is an interview with a doctor that treated his UC with a fecaltransplant.

http://thepowerofpoop.com/fecal-tran...ccess-story-8/
12-02-2013, 12:45 PM   #109
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I'm taking our daughter to Mayo next week. I'm hoping to get their opinion on fecal transplants and hoping that it's favorable. Our GI doctor isn't using this therapeutically, therefore, we haven't been able to talk to her much about it.
12-02-2013, 01:07 PM   #110
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a few days ago some posted ( I think wildbill ) link re; Japanese study butyrate acid, could that some one repost it , thanks
12-02-2013, 01:40 PM   #111
wildbill_52280
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here is testimony of a woman's fecal transplant experiance to treat UC.

http://glimpse.bahneman.com/category/fmt/
12-05-2013, 02:44 AM   #112
wildbill_52280
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i added some info on how to make saline solution to perform a fecal transplant in the main post of this thread for anyone that may plan on doing a fecal transplant.

I will add more instructions as my own time permits, other wise you will still have to read though the linked documents in the main post to get more details, which do not contain any instructions on how to make saline solution.
12-06-2013, 04:33 PM   #113
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Here is an amazing article about the powerful roles intestinal bacteria play in our health, and where the science is headed. This is why restoring healthy bacteria in IBD with a fecal transplant could cure the condition.

PSA is a molecule produced by the good bacteria bacteroides fragilis.

Now in his own lab at the California Institute of Technology, Mazmanian has learned that PSA induces the development of immune cells called regulatory T cells (Tregs), which tell the immune response when to turn off.3 Dysfunction in Tregs is associated with numerous inflammatory, autoimmune, and allergic disorders in humans, and Mazmanian and his colleagues have shown that feeding PSA to a mouse with inflammatory bowel disease or multiple sclerosis can treat and even cure the ailments.
http://www.the-scientist.com/?articl...obe-Machinist/

here is another article about the same researcher and how autism may be caused by disruption on intestinal bacteria.
http://news.sciencemag.org/biology/2...-symptoms-mice
12-10-2013, 09:22 PM   #114
greypup
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My daughter and I are finishing her visit to Mayo tomorrow morning. Our conversation about fecal transplants with the pediatric GI didn't get very far. The doc said the problem with fecal transplants and crohn's patients is 1) getting it into the small intestine by way of anesthesia on a monthly basis and 2)defining the requirements of the donor. I shouldn't be surprised at this response.
12-23-2013, 03:15 PM   #115
wildbill_52280
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Here is an interveiw with Doctor David Suskind who is studying Fecal transplants in Crohn's Disease @ Seattle Childrens Hospital.

http://kuow.org/post/seattle-childre...-bowel-disease


below is some information on his study from my original post of this thread-
Crohn’s disease and Ulcerative colitis
Seattle Children's Hospital
Seattle, Washington, United States, 98105
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01757964
Estimated Primary Completion Date: December 2014
12-23-2013, 04:19 PM   #116
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Ng tube looks like the way to go
12-23-2013, 07:55 PM   #117
wildbill_52280
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Ng tube looks like the way to go
considering that there was a recent report that one dose of 150 milliliters of solution through nasogastric tube was enough to put a crohn's patient in complete remission, that Highly suggests Oral route either pill or NG tube is the way to go. Doing 30-60 enemas is a serious amount of work to put yourself through to achieve remission like some of the earlier studies have showed. And it would very hard to find a donor that could fit your schedule to meet up and donate 30-60 times, with out them having to quit there job so you could do a fecal transplant.

not to toot my own horn here, but this is what i have been saying in the beginning about my prediction that the oral route would be when we saw real results in crohn's disease. This is why i made the attempt to make a fecal transplant pill which is too much of a technical task for me to achieve at this moment in time.
12-23-2013, 09:05 PM   #118
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Surely there's some sort of way we can petition for more trials. I'd sign it and share it, the more trials they do the more they're going to find that it is helping with people with crohns. Whats frustrating is it's already proven to have put people in remission, even if only 5 of 10 people go into remission that 5 should give enough reason to do more research (which I know they are doing), I guess I'm just impatient! I dream of the day when all of us are cured of ibd
12-23-2013, 09:15 PM   #119
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And I'm just saying that I'm a donor in waiting and happy to contribute to research!

I eat well, have no IBD or any other health conditions. I'm 47 years old. I want my daughter cured!!!
01-05-2014, 01:36 PM   #120
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Here is an article about a company that may be the first to provide the medical industry with a reliable source of frozen stool(a stool Bank) to help people get treated with a Fecal transplant. For starters, to treat people with C. difficile infection and after the research is completed, Fecal Transplants for IBD.

Article is courtesy of Tracy Mac (shes awesome BTW) from The Power of Poop Website.

http://thepowerofpoop.com/openbiome-...al-microbiota/

Last edited by wildbill_52280; 01-05-2014 at 05:51 PM.
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