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08-12-2014, 01:48 PM   #241
rollinstone
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Yep it was fresh not frozen, he's well aware of the effects of exposing the bacteria to oxygen they take every caution, they've been doing this for the last 25 years, each time trying to perfect the process, he will openly tell you before you go in he doesn't know how or why it works in some people, the thought is that if your inflammation is being caused by an unknown species of pathogenic bacteria, maybe multiple then the new bacteria acts as a potent anti biotic and kills those pathogenic bacteria, hence we see some instant dramatic improvement in some people.

I think however, if ones problem goes beyond the bacteria in the gut, and moreover is to do with an immune deficiency, I.e faulty macrophages or intracellular MAP infection, you're not going to see the benefits from FMT... Never know if you don't try though.
08-12-2014, 03:52 PM   #242
wildbill_52280
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Yep it was fresh not frozen, he's well aware of the effects of exposing the bacteria to oxygen they take every caution, they've been doing this for the last 25 years, each time trying to perfect the process, he will openly tell you before you go in he doesn't know how or why it works in some people, the thought is that if your inflammation is being caused by an unknown species of pathogenic bacteria, maybe multiple then the new bacteria acts as a potent anti biotic and kills those pathogenic bacteria, hence we see some instant dramatic improvement in some people.

I think however, if ones problem goes beyond the bacteria in the gut, and moreover is to do with an immune deficiency, I.e faulty macrophages or intracellular MAP infection, you're not going to see the benefits from FMT... Never know if you don't try though.
thanks joshuaaa, I was hoping you could be more precise about what it is exactly and precisely they do though. I could assume he would know 99% of the bacteria in the gi tract are extremely oxygen sensitive, but when doing science, we have to make as few or little assumptions as possible, so I'm searching for knowledge on what he is doing with a high degree of certainty. So I want to go a little beyond just making that assumption. It's ok though if you didn't really observe every detail of the process.

We may be laymen here on a website independent of the highly trained world of acedemia, but it is my goal to hold myself to a similar standard, or at least try my best. So lets for a moment assume every precaution was taken to preseve the donors stool from oxygen, then my nexts best guess to explain such variability in results would be the ph of the donors stool, as some of the bacteria we need are highly sensitive to ph fluctuations. PH can be positively affected by the donors diet days prior to sample collection. But there going to be a limit to what I can EVER know without throwing myself back in school to be apart of the research myself!! haha.

So glad you went to borody's clinic to do this, it was definitely worth a shot and may be worth another shot as well. Its truly just the beginning of a new science, we have only recently (perhaps a decade) applied DNA techniques to reveal the secrets of the world of bacteria, and only 2 years since mapping the microbiome. FDA clinical trials on Fecal Transplants began this year 2014 so yea this is the beginning, You are a leader and a pioneer in scientific medicine Joshuaaa.
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http://www.crohnsforum.com/showthread.php?t=52400
08-14-2014, 09:31 PM   #243
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Here is a very good video made by Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America on fecal transplants. Gives good info on recent studies on fecal transplants.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ZjTSNyoH3k
08-22-2014, 03:03 PM   #244
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Here is a Recent paper released discussing the variability in results of fecal transplants, or why its efficacy is sometimes dramatic and other times slow going or takes no effect at all. Finally they talk about donor stool quality as a variable to efficacy, something i have been waiting for people to address more.

My own thoughts are we are not trying to control all the variables that exist such as donor diet or patient diet, so we don't know how that may affect the outcomes. Hopefully some researchers will try to examine this in the coming years, but at least they talk about it a little bit here. the quantitys of bacteria in stool can vary from one donor to another, and one sample to another in the same donor, so the potency can vary quite a bit.

http://journals.lww.com/jcge/Fulltex...ota.6.aspx#R12

Last edited by wildbill_52280; 08-23-2014 at 12:54 PM.
08-23-2014, 10:09 PM   #245
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I found two new studies for Fecal Transplants in Crohn's disease, that will total 15 studies planned in the U.S and around the world. Momentum is still going strong for this treatment, so hang in there!! A few have been completed already but I don't recall which ones. Whats great is i think we have enough suggestive evidence to keep things moving, so things aren't going to slow down anytime soon, and are more likely to pick up with more studies to come.

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/...%2F2014&rank=6

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/...%2F2014&rank=1
08-24-2014, 12:33 PM   #246
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news segment on KZTV10 Corpus Christi Texas about successful treatment of man with U.C. with a Fecal Transplant.
http://www.kztv10.com/player/?video_id=38827
08-24-2014, 08:06 PM   #247
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This is an execerpt from a book called "Think Like a Freak" by Levitt and Dubner (earlier books "Freakonomics" and "Super Freakonomics"). None of these books are medical in nature, they simply view problems through data rather than dogma.

Borody and FMT come near the end.

The point of this quote is that this comes from a NY Times top selling book...the word is getting out into the general media.

You might think that medicine, with such strong doese of science and logic, is on field in which root cases are always well understood.

Alas, you would be wrong. The human body is a complex, dynamic system about which a great deal remans unknown. Writing as recently as 1997, the medical historian Roy Poerter put it this way: "We live in an age of science, but science has not eliminated fantasies about health; the stigmas of sickness, the moral meanings of medicine continue." As a result, gut huncheas are routinely passed off as dogma while conventional wisdom flourishes even when there is no data to back it up.

Consider the ulcer. It is essentially a hole in your stomach or small intestine, producing a searing and surging pain. Bu the early 1980s, the acuses of an ulcer were said to be definitively known: they were inherited or caused by psychological stress anspicy food, either of which could produce an overabundance of stomach acid. To anyone who has ever eaten a pile of jalapenos, this seams plausible. And as any doctor could attest, a patient with a bleeding ulcer was likely to be stressed out. (A doctor might just as seasily not that shooting victims tend to bleed a lot, but that doesn't mean the blood caused the gunshot.)

Since the causes of ulcers were known, so too was the treatment. Patients were advised to relax (to cut down on stress), drink milk (to soothe the stomach), and take a Zantax or Tagamet pill (to block the production of stomach acid).

How well did this work?

To put it charitably: so-so. The treatment did hel manage a patient's pain, but the condition wasn't cured. And an ulcer is more than a painful nuisance. It can easily becom fatal due to peritonitis (caused by a hole going clear through the stomach wall) or complications from bleeding. Some ulcers required major surgery, with all the attendant complications.

Although ulcer patients didn't make out so well under the standard treatment, the medical community did just fine. Millions of patients required the constant service of gastroenterologists and surgeons, while pharmaceutical companites got righ: the antacides Tagamet and Zantak were the first true blockbuster drugs, taking in more than $1 billion a year. By 1994, the global ulcer market was worth more than $8 billion.

In the past, some medical researcher might have suggested that ulcers and other stomach ailments, including cancer, had a different root cause-perhaps even bacterial. But the medical establishment was quick to point out the glaring flaw in this theory: How could bacteria possibly survive in the acidic cauldron of the stomach?

And so the ulcer-treatment juggernaut rolled on. There wasn't much of an incentive to find a cure-not, at least, by the people whose careers depended on the prevailing ulcer treatment.

Fortunately the world is more diverse than that. In 1981, a young Australian medical resident named Barry Marshall was on the hunt for a research project. He had just taken up a rotation in the gastroenterology unit at Royal Perth Hospital, where a senior pathologist had stumbled onto a mystery. As Marshall later described it: "We've got 20 patients with bacteria in their stomach, where you shouldn't have bateria living because there's too much acid." The senior doctor, Robin Warren, was looking for a young researcher to heal "find out what's wrong with these people."

The squiggly bacteria resembled a species called Campylobacter, which can cause infection in people who spend time with chickens. Were these human bacteria indeed Campylobacter? What kind of diseases might they lead to? And wy were they so concentrated among patients with gastric trouble?

Barry Marshall, as it turns out, was already familiar with Campylobacter, for his father had worked as a refrigeration engineer in a chicken-packing plant. Marshall's mother, meanwhile, was a nurse. "We use to have a lot of arguments about what was really true in medicine," he told an interviewe4r, the esteemed medical journalist Norman Swan. "She would 'know' things because they were folklore, and I would say 'That's old-fashioned. There's no basis for it in fact.' 'Yes, but people have been doing it for hundres of years, Barry.'"

Marshal was excited by the mystery he inherited. Using samples from Dr. Warren's patients, he tried to culture the squiggly bacteria in the lab. For months, he failed. But after an accident-the culture was left in the incubator three days longer than intended-it finally grew. It wasn't Campylobacter; it was a previously undiscovered bacteria, henceforth known as Helicobacter pylori.

"We cultured it from lots of people after that," Marshall recalls. "The we could say, 'We know which antibiotic kills these bacteria.' We fitured out how they could live in the stomach, and we could play around with it in the test tube, do all kinds of useful experiments.... We were not looking for the cause of ulcers. We wanted to find out what these bacteria were, and we thought it would be funt to get a nice little publication."

Marshall and Warren continued to look for this bacteria in patients who came to see them with stomach trouble. The doctors soon made a startling discovery: among 13 patients with ulcers, all 13 also had the squiggly bacteria! Was it possible that H. pylori, rather than merely showing up in these patients, was actually causing the ulcers?

Back in the lab, Marshall tried infecting some rats and pigs with H. pylori to see if they developed ulcers. They didn't. "So I said, 'I have to test it out on a human.'"

The human, Marshall decided, would be himself. He also decided not to tell anyone, even his wife or Robin Warren. First he had a biopsy taken of his stomach to make sure he didn't already have H. pylori. All clear. Then he swallowed a batch of the bacteria that he had cultured from a patient. In Marshall's mind, there wer two likely possibilities:

1. He would develop an ulcer. "And then, hallelujah, it'd be proven."
2. He wouldn't develop an ulcer. "If nothing happened, my two years of research to taht point would have been wasted."

Barry Marshall was probably the only person in human history rooting for himself to get an ulcer. If he did, he figured it would take a few years for symptoms to arise.

But just five days after he gulped down the H. pylori, Marshall began having vomiting attacks. Hallelujah! After ten days, he had another biopsy taken of his stomach, "and the bacteria were everywhere." Marshall already had gastritis and was apparently well on his way to getting an ulcer. He took an antibiotic to help wipe it out. His and Warren's investigation had proved that H. pylori was the true cause of ulcers-and, as further investigation woudl show, of stomach cancer as well. It was an astonishing breakthrough.

Granted, there was much testing to come-and an enormous pushback from the medical community. Marshall was variously ridiculed, pilloried, and ignored. Are we to seriously believe that some loopy Australian found the cause of ulcers by swallowing a batch of some bacteria that he says he discovered himself? No $8 billion industry is ever happy when its reason for being is under attach. Talk about gastric upset! An ulcer, rather than requiring a lifetime of doctor's visits and Zantac and perhaps surgery, could not be vanquished with a cheap dose of antibiotics.

It took years for the ulcer proof to fully take hold, for conventional wisdom dies hard. Even today, many people still believe that ulcers are caused by stress or spicy foods. Fortunately, doctors now know better. The medical community finally came to acknowledge that while everyone else was simply treating the symptoms of an ulcer, Barry Marshall and Robin Warren had uncovered its root cause. In 2005, the were awarded the Nobel Prize.

The ulcer discovery, stunning as it was, constitutes just one small step in a revolution that is only beginning to unfold, a revolution aimed toward finding the root cause of illness rather than simpley swatting away the symptoms.

H. pylori, it turns out, isn't some lone-wolf bacterial terrorist that managed to slip past security and invade th stomach. In recent years, enterprising scientists-aided by newly powerful computers that facilitate DNA sequencing-have learned that the human gut is home to thousands of species of microbes. Some are good, some are bad, and others are situationally good or bad, and may have yet to reveal their nature.

Just how many microbes to each of us host? By one estimate, the human body contains ten times as many microbial cells as human cells, which pust the number easily in the trillions and perhaps in the quadrillions. This "microbial cloud," as the biologist Jonathan Eisen calls it, is so vast that some scientists consider it the largest organ in the human body. And within it my lie the root of much human health...or illness.

In labs all over the world, researchers have begun to explore whether the ingredients in this sparwling microbial stew-much of which is hereditary-may be responsible for diseases like cancer and multiple sclerosis and diabetes, even obesity and mental illness. Does it seem absurd to think that a given ailment that has haunted humankind for millennia may be cause by the malfunction of a micro-organism that has been merrily swimming through our intestines the whole time?

Perhaps-just as it seemed absurd to all those ulcer doctors and pharmaceutical executives that Barry Marshall knew what he was talking about.

To be sure, these are early days in microbial exploration. The gut is still a frontier-think of the ocean floor or the surface of Mars. But already the research is paying off. A handful of doctors have successfully treated patients suffering from intestinal malidies by giving them a transfusion of healthy gut bacterial.

Where to these healthy bacteria come from, and how are they sluiced into the sick person's gut? Before going further, let us offer two notes of caution:

1. If you happen to be eating as you read this, you may wish to take a break.

2. If you are reading this book many years after it was written (assuming there are still people, and they still read books), the method described below may seem barbarically primitive. In fact we hope that is the case, for ti would mean the treatment has proven valueable but that the delivery methods have improved.

Okay, so a sick person needs a transfusion of healthy gut bacteria. What is a viable source?

Doctors like Thomas Borody, and Australian gastroenterologist who drew inspiration from Barry Marshall's ulcer research, have identified one answer: human feces. Yes, it appears that the microbe-rich excrement of a healthy person may be just the medicine for a patient whose own cut bateria are infected, damaged, or incomplete. Fecal matter is obtained from a "donor" and blended into a saline mixture that, according to one Dutch gastroenterologist, looks like chocolate milk. The mixture is then transfused, often via an enema, into the gut of the patient. In recent years, doctors have found fecal transplants to be effective in wiping out intestinalinfections that antibiotics could not. In one small study, Borody claims to have used fecal transplants to effectively cure people who were suffering from ulcerative colitis-which, he says, was "previously an incurable disease."

But Borody has been going beyond mere intestinal ailments. He claims to have successfully used fecal transplants to treat patients with multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease. Indeed, while Borody is careful to say that much more research is needed, the list of ailments that may have a root cause living in the human gut is nearly endless.

To Borody and a small band of like-minded brethren who believe in the power of poop, we are standing at the threshold of a new era in medicine. Borody sees the benefits of fecal therapy as "equivalent to the discovery of antibiotics." But first, there is much skepticism to overcome.

"Well, the feedback is very much like Barry Marshall's," says Borody. "I was initially ostracized. Even now my colleagues avoid talking about this or meeting me at conferences. Although this is changing. I've just had a nice string of invitations to speak at national and international conferences about fecal transplantation. But the aversion is always there. It'd be much nicer if we coulde come up with a non-fecal-sounding therapy."

Indeed. One can imagine many patients being turned off by the words fecal transplant or, as researchers call it in the academic papers, "fecal microbiota transplantation." The slang used by some doctors ("shit swap") is no better. But Borody, after years of performing this procedure, believes he has finally come up with a less disturbing name.

"Yes," he says, "we call it a 'transpoosion.'"

--Book: Think Like a Freak (2014)
--Authors: Steven D. Levitt & Stephen J. Dubner
I hand typed this. I did not include italics. Sorry for any typos, there are probably plenty...I didn't go back an proof it.
08-24-2014, 08:26 PM   #248
7vNH
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Here is a very good video made by Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America on fecal transplants. Gives good info on recent studies on fecal transplants.
I don't know anything about ccfa, but I see that they are funded primarily by pharmaceutical companies: AbbVie, Actavis, Covidien, Janssen, Pfizer, Prometheus, ReddHill, Salix, Shire, Takeda.

What would happen to the revenues of these companies if there were an "H. pylori" set of breakthroughs, one for UC and one for CD?

Sorry for being skeptical, but my default is to "follow the money", and I'd say most of these companies would take a serious hit if a real cure happened to be discovered.

I'm only 20 minutes into the presentation (so far it's all fluff), but just looking at the title, I'm a little put-off by the fact that they lumped dietary change in with FMT. The former has been tweaked and tested for a hundred years and we know that it's not going to be a cure for anything.
08-24-2014, 09:30 PM   #249
wildbill_52280
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I don't know anything about ccfa, but I see that they are funded primarily by pharmaceutical companies: AbbVie, Actavis, Covidien, Janssen, Pfizer, Prometheus, ReddHill, Salix, Shire, Takeda.

What would happen to the revenues of these companies if there were an "H. pylori" set of breakthroughs, one for UC and one for CD?

Sorry for being skeptical, but my default is to "follow the money", and I'd say most of these companies would take a serious hit if a real cure happened to be discovered.

I'm only 20 minutes into the presentation (so far it's all fluff), but just looking at the title, I'm a little put-off by the fact that they lumped dietary change in with FMT. The former has been tweaked and tested for a hundred years and we know that it's not going to be a cure for anything.
Well I like some aspects of the way you think and if i ever need a typist ill know who to call since you claim to have typed the entire last post, haha.The idea of intestinal bacteria being the cause of disease has existed way before barry marshall and his h pylori experiments, elie mecthnikoff book in the early 1900's developed a theory of aging and disease implicating intestinal bacteria and a concept of endotoxemia aka autointoxication.
http://books.google.com/books?id=XJM...%20life&f=true

here is his book full text http://books.google.com/books?id=XJM...%20life&f=true

And John harvey kellogg who started kellogg cereals was a doctor who tried applying these theories by giving yogurt enemas to patients.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Ha...eek_Sanitarium
http://books.google.com/books?id=kbM...page&q&f=false

Also my thoughts on Barry Marshalls "proof" that H.pylori was the cause of ulcers I'm wondering where he ever thought people were coming into contact with large amounts of h pylori in the first place to develop an ulcer, as his experiment may never simulate realistic conditions. and how do we know he needed antibiotics to clear this infection or if his body would have eventually recovered on its own? its a start, but that wouldn't be sufficient to prove this is how people developed ulcers in real life, but its a good observation to build a theory. Obviously we now see how barry's conclusions may not have been justified in light of the new techniques we have to study bacteria, and that he simply had a theoretical model which probably should have been refined, well now its being refined as we see.


As far as the skepticism of any company developing a cure, it seems the fecal transplant pill would be the cure all, only if it is based on the full microbiota and not selected bacterial species. There are patents that exist and money to be made off this for sure and they are working on this right now, but as far as i recall its not a full flora, that's the one we will want, but a selection of the right bacteria would do alot for us, but people may have damage all over the place.
08-26-2014, 10:39 AM   #250
7vNH
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There is a free course on coursera.org about the microbiome. The course is from the people who are heading the american gut project. The course starts in October.

Gut Check: Exploring your Microbiome
08-26-2014, 11:04 AM   #251
7vNH
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As far as the skepticism of any company developing a cure, it seems the fecal transplant pill would be the cure all, only if it is based on the full microbiota and not selected bacterial species. There are patents that exist and money to be made off this for sure and they are working on this right now, but as far as i recall its not a full flora, that's the one we will want, but a selection of the right bacteria would do alot for us, but people may have damage all over the place.
In my horrific skepticism, I see anything that is used once for a cure as a nightmare for any of the pharmaceutical companies that have a "take for the rest of your life" drug on the market.

I'm no lawyer, nor have I concentrated very hard on the topic of patent protection, but I thought I heard somewhere that living things can not be patented? If there are companies out there that are trying to isolate various gut microbes to use in a non-full flora cure, maybe that would be patentable. The good news about some patented mix of microbes: the insurance companies would see that even if treatment with this magic juice was really expensive, it would be cheaper than paying for these insanely priced biologics for the rest of one's life, not to mention the surgery when the drugs quit working. We just have to hope that they don't engineer the magic juice to stop working after a few months (i.e. the don't create a cure, instead they come up with something they'd like better: a cash cow for them that would require patients to use it for the rest of their days).
08-26-2014, 12:25 PM   #252
wildbill_52280
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In my horrific skepticism, I see anything that is used once for a cure as a nightmare for any of the pharmaceutical companies that have a "take for the rest of your life" drug on the market.

I'm no lawyer, nor have I concentrated very hard on the topic of patent protection, but I thought I heard somewhere that living things can not be patented? If there are companies out there that are trying to isolate various gut microbes to use in a non-full flora cure, maybe that would be patentable. The good news about some patented mix of microbes: the insurance companies would see that even if treatment with this magic juice was really expensive, it would be cheaper than paying for these insanely priced biologics for the rest of one's life, not to mention the surgery when the drugs quit working. We just have to hope that they don't engineer the magic juice to stop working after a few months (i.e. the don't create a cure, instead they come up with something they'd like better: a cash cow for them that would require patients to use it for the rest of their days).
yea i recall that bacteria are not patentable, or at least probiotics. the mixture that you develop and the method of encapsulation or even the concept of human feces derived bacteria for the use of treating a specific ailment, might be patentable though and i recall Dr Borody holds some patents on this. So there are these concepts of the uses they have that people can patent, THAT is what makes it an invention, but don't quote be verbatim. There may be a way to actually isolate the right bacteria learn to culture them(good luck!!) but you would never legally be allowed to advertise them with the use intended unless you put them through fda clinical trials for the defined ailment, so doing that would merely be a personal project and not a business.

here are some patents that exist
http://www.sumobrain.com/patents/wip...012016287.html
http://www.sumobrain.com/patents/wip...011033310.html

As far as the money to gain from a once use drug think about the recently proven treatment for hepatitis c, the price is really high top of my head 80,000 for a 12 week treatment to cure hep c. so they would probably just raise the price. this is really not my area of expertise though, so just off the top of my head.


there are companies that are making the type of drugs that are based on the metabolites of the good bacteria, rather then the good bacteria itself, so this would be more along the lines of a continuous treatment for life rather then the possibility of a cure. all sorts of stuff going on nobody knows how things will pan out, im pretty certain for IBD we replace the bacteria and were done for life, seems the evidence is slowly pointing in that direction especially with borodys word for word quote in recent medical journals stating some patients seem cured of UC and Crohn's.

Last edited by wildbill_52280; 01-21-2015 at 01:40 PM.
08-26-2014, 03:05 PM   #253
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I've got some Coursera moocs on the go. Bet that one will get my brain in a fluff, lol.
08-27-2014, 11:19 AM   #254
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Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Induces Early Improvement in Symptoms in Patients With Active Crohn's Disease
Byron P. Vaughn, Dirk Gevers, Amanda Ting, Joshua R. Korzenik, Simon C. Robson, Alan C. Moss
http://www.gastrojournal.org/article...14)62143-0/pdf

The question is: can the remission be sustained?
08-27-2014, 12:10 PM   #255
wildbill_52280
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Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Induces Early Improvement in Symptoms in Patients With Active Crohn's Disease
Byron P. Vaughn, Dirk Gevers, Amanda Ting, Joshua R. Korzenik, Simon C. Robson, Alan C. Moss
http://www.gastrojournal.org/article...14)62143-0/pdf

The question is: can the remission be sustained?

Read the first post of this thread for reports of sustained remission up to 12 years in crohn's disease. This prompted Professor Borody to suspect the patient may have been cured. what is new about the report you provided is that i believe this is one of the first times a crohn's patient achieved a remission with a single colonoscopic FMT. The 12 years remission occured with a nasoduodenal tube.
08-27-2014, 07:47 PM   #256
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Borody says 1 in 30 itl sustain remission for CD, if it doesn't then it's probably because your cd isn't primarily caused by a disbiosis but rather an infection, probably AEIC or MAP, if it is caused by a disbiosis then you'll probably see the results your after. But it's still early early days, hopefully they'll discover how to make it more successful
For cd soon
09-03-2014, 11:22 AM   #257
wildbill_52280
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A recent news article on the regulation of fecal transplants.

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/ar...dicine/379491/
09-09-2014, 12:48 PM   #258
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So one of my original intentions for this thread was for people who wanted to find donors to do a fecal transplant, could help each other do this, so I'm bringing this issue back up i guess, any comments or ideas?

With 15 f.d.a. clinical trials underway and official documented cases being cured, I'd think it's pretty clear this idea is real and has promise. I suppose some people are fine with waiting 3-5 years for this treatment to be available, while some are not.

Last edited by wildbill_52280; 09-09-2014 at 01:21 PM.
09-09-2014, 03:08 PM   #259
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I understand that there are clinics that will be opening in travel destinations near, but not within th US.

In other words, you take a vacation and work-in adopting a new micribiome!
09-11-2014, 01:25 PM   #260
wildbill_52280
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Hot off the Press!!
23 out of 30 patients achieve remission with fecal transplant via naso-duodenal tube( aka mid gut).note also that these were all the worst cases of crohn's disease resistant to medications(refractory). Also note this was achieved with one dose of oral FMT rather then 30-60 enemas or colonoscopic FMT.



J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014 Aug 28. doi: 10.1111/jgh.12727. [Epub ahead of print]
Fecal microbiota transplantation through mid-gut for refractory Crohn's disease: Safety, feasibility and efficacy trial results.

Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIM:
The gut microbiota plays a pivotal role in the intestinal diseases. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) might be a rescue therapy for refractory inflammatory bowel disease. This study aimed to evaluate the safety, feasibility and efficacy of FMT through mid-gut for refractory Crohn's disease (CD).
METHODS:
We established standardized laboratory protocol and clinical work flow for FMT. Only refractory CD patients with Harvey-Bradshaw Index (HBI) score ≥ 7 were enrolled for this study. All included patients were treated with single FMT through mid-gut and assessed during follow-up.
RESULTS:
Metagenomics analysis showed a high concordance between feces sample and purified fecal microbiota from same donors. Standardized fecal microbiota preparation and clinical flow significantly simplified the practical aspects of FMT. Totally 30 patients were qualified for the present analysis. The rate of clinical improvement and remission based on clinical activity at the first month was 86.7 % (26/30) and 76.7 % (23/30) respectively, which was higher than other assessment points within 15-month follow-up. Patients' body weight increased after FMT, and the lipid profile improved as well. FMT also showed a fast and continuous significant effect in relieving the sustaining abdominal pain associated with sustaining CD.
CONCLUSIONS:
This is a pilot study with the largest sample of patients with refractory CD underwent single FMT. The results demonstrated that FMT through mid-gut might be a safe, feasible, and efficient rescue therapy for refractory CD.
This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Last edited by wildbill_52280; 09-11-2014 at 04:39 PM.
09-12-2014, 09:03 AM   #261
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Oh, WOW! I want a FMT! Get me well NHS. this is so promising. I so want to achieve remission.
09-24-2014, 11:04 AM   #262
wildbill_52280
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An link to the september issue of the journal of the san francisco medical society which is focused on microbiome science.

http://issuu.com/sfmedsociety/docs/s...352192#/signin
10-02-2014, 10:33 PM   #263
wildbill_52280
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a scientist gives himself a fecal transplant from a donor in remote african tribe to increase his microbial diversity.

http://www.popsci.com/article/scienc...ers-microbiome

http://humanfoodproject.com/rebecomi...nter-gatherer/
10-05-2014, 09:37 PM   #264
Jennifer
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wildbill_52280 I see that you haven't done this a second time. Have you spoken to your GI about trying it? What did they say? You also never mentioned (or at least I didn't see it) how you got into contact with your first donor.
__________________
Diagnosis: Crohn's in 1991 at age 9
Surgeries: 1 Small Bowel Resection in 1999; Central IV in 1991-92
Meds for CD: 6MP 50mg
Things I take: Tenormin 25mg (PVCs and Tachycardia), Junel, Tylenol 3, Omeprazole 20mg 2/day, Klonopin 1mg 2/day (anxiety), Restoril 15mg (insomnia), Claritin 20mg
Currently in: REMISSION Thought it was a flare but it's just scar tissue from my resection. Dealing with a stricture. Remission from my resection, 17 years and counting.
10-05-2014, 09:42 PM   #265
nogutsnoglory
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Mixed results in trials. It's interesting but far from definitive.
http://m.gastroendonews.com/Article....ab=MostEmailed
10-05-2014, 10:04 PM   #266
wildbill_52280
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Mixed results in trials. It's interesting but far from definitive.
http://m.gastroendonews.com/Article....ab=MostEmailed
this link isnt working but i think i read this article already.
there's going to mixed results for some time. check out post #260 of this thread. there are also other examples of success, these protocols are not perfected yet. the fact that some studies have shown little effect does not make other more successful studies less true, its a matter of explaining why some are successfull and some are not, it doesn't negate the results of other studies, they are BOTH true. Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't, more studies are need to determine why, but it's working that's a fact.

Last edited by wildbill_52280; 10-05-2014 at 11:54 PM.
10-12-2014, 10:12 PM   #267
wildbill_52280
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frozen fecal transplant pills

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014...m_content=2035
10-12-2014, 11:06 PM   #268
HelenMelb
 
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That's brilliant. Hopefully, trials using these for Crohn's/IBD aren't too far away.

Thanks for the article wildbill.
10-15-2014, 11:14 PM   #269
wildbill_52280
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http://www.boston.com/health/2014/10...npM/story.html
10-22-2014, 12:16 AM   #270
Malgrave
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Has diversion colitis ever been treated with FMT?
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