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Crohn's Disease Forum » Diet, Fitness, and Supplements » New study on Fiber and IBD


07-10-2013, 12:47 PM   #1
RedWhiteNews
 
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New study on Fiber and IBD

I just read this and am curious what you all think. They didn't mention Crohn's, instead talking about Celiac Disease, but my guess is that it could be similar.
.....

sciencenews.orghttp://www.sciencenews.org/view/generic/id/351462/description/Bacterial_molecules_may_prevent_inflammatory_bowel _disease
Bacterial molecules may prevent inflammatory bowel disease | Genes & Cells

Common compounds produced by gut microbes quench colitis in mice

By Jessica Shugart

Web edition: July 9, 2013

Common molecules made by bacteria in the gut may act as chill pills for the immune system. Molecules secreted by intestinal bacteria work to prevent misplaced immune attacks in inflammatory bowel diseases like colitis, a new study finds.

“It is a huge advance,” says Sarkis Mazmanian of Caltech. “This opens up the notion that a very easy and potentially very safe therapy for inflammatory bowel disease could exist.”

Decades of research have hinted that microbes play a role in immune-related diseases such as obesity, allergy, inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer. But scientists have had difficulty pinpointing direct links between the bacteria in the gut and the army of immune cells that live there.

Some researchers have focused on individual microbial species among the gut’s teeming hordes to see how they affect the immune system. But Wendy Garrett’s team at Harvard University decided to look instead for possible immune tamers among the various molecules that many different bacteria make. The team chose to investigate short-chain fatty acids because bacterial species that make large amounts are in short supply in some people with inflammatory bowel disease.

To see whether the microbial molecules play a role in quieting the immune system, the researchers added them to mice’s drinking water. The animals developed elevated levels of inflammation-dousing regulatory T cells in their colons, the team reports July 4 in Science. The cells work like wet blankets, dampening autoimmune flare-ups before they burn out of control.

The team also found that those short-chain fatty acids protected the mice from an experimental form of colitis, an immune disease that destroys the colon.

Garrett hopes that the acids play the same role in tamping down inflammation in people. Many bacterial species that inhabit the guts of humans also produce the acids. And people might not even have to take the fatty acids as drugs. Eating higher amounts of dietary fiber might also do the trick because the microbes consume fiber to make the acids.

Studies have shown that, compared with people in some developing countries, westerners tend to consume lower amounts of dietary fiber and have lower amounts of short-chain fatty acids in their guts. They also have higher — and increasing — levels of inflammatory bowel disease.

The study suggests that a lack of dietary fiber could reduce levels of short-chain fatty acids in the gut and might explain that elevated prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease, says gut microbiologist Justin Sonnenburg at Stanford University. “A really good hypothesis at this point is that reduced short-chain fatty acid production over time is bad for colonic health.”

Citations

P. Smith et al. The microbial metabolites, short chain fatty acids, regulate colonic Treg cell homeostasis. Science online, July 4, 2013, doi: 10.1126/science.1241165, [Go to].

Suggested Reading

T. Saey. Inside Job. June 18, 2011, Vol. 179, p. 26 [Go to]

G. Dickey. Gut bacteria reflect dietary differences. Vol. 178, August 28, 2010, p. 9 http://www.sciencenews.org/view/gene...ry_differences

C. De Filippo. Impact of diet shaping gut microbiota revealed by a comparative study in children from Europe and rural Africa. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Vol. 107, August 17, 2010. p. 33, doi:10.1073/pnas.1005963107[Go to]
07-10-2013, 01:00 PM   #2
nogutsnoglory
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I think fiber is great as a possible preventative but that once you develop IBD it becomes tricky. Fiber can irritate an inflamed gut but should be fine if one is in complete remission.
07-10-2013, 03:20 PM   #3
crohnsbegone
 
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Does too much fiber cause excessive flare-ups and gas?
07-10-2013, 03:26 PM   #4
RedWhiteNews
 
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Not that I have ever heard of. While having a flare, fiber should be avoided as it is hurts when it passes by the inflamed area. This study suggests that high fiber MIGHT help keep Crohn's in remission.
07-10-2013, 04:29 PM   #5
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Crohnsbegone certain fibrous foods can exacerbate gas but not fiber itself.
07-11-2013, 02:10 AM   #6
hugh
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I like it,
Certain Bacteria secrete molecules that moderate the immune system response.
no surprises there,

This part is just a leap of faith , it shows a correlation, but definitely no causation, and may easily have an adverse effect.
"Studies have shown that, compared with people in some developing countries, westerners tend to consume lower amounts of dietary fiber and have lower amounts of short-chain fatty acids in their guts. They also have higher — and increasing — levels of inflammatory bowel disease."

Fibre is food for bacteria, no arguments there but that's not necessarily a good thing. the 'wrong' bacteria will produce a bad effect, the 'good' bacteria will produce a good effect

"There are three problems: helping bacteria feed and multiply may be undesirable; fiber, such as the brans of cereal grains, often contains toxic proteins; and, finally, whole grain fibers and other “roughage” scrape and injure the intestinal wall.
Softer soluble fibers from fruits and some vegetables are much more likely to help than wheat bran, but even they may be a good thing only in moderation, or only in a healthy bowel. Fiber feeds pathogenic bacteria as well as probiotic bacteria, and increases the populations of both. When the gut is damaged and leaky, more bacteria mean more bacterial toxins and more pathogens infiltrating the body. A low-fiber diet, leading to reduced bacterial populations in the gut, may be desirable for bowel disease patients
"[until balance is restored]
http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2010/07...g-food-toxins/
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