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Crohn's Disease Forum » General IBD Discussion » Donating one's body to science


03-21-2009, 08:18 PM   #1
GoJohnnyGo
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Donating one's body to science

This is what I plan on doing. For someone in my circumstance, it actually works out well. I've filled out my form with the local university (which happens to be an important Crohn's research faculty). I won't have a standard funeral, obviously, but I will get two memorial services paid for. I don't even mind medical students poking about with my bits and parts. My hope is that someone will learn something along the way, and what I cannot accomplish in life I can partially contribute in death.

Sorry for being so morbid. I just want to tie up the loose ends ahead of time.
03-21-2009, 08:52 PM   #2
NatalieMT
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It's okay to be morbid, sometimes I don't think people talk about death and the process of dying enough. Everyone seems to want to sweep the subject under the carpet and forget about it. But the matter of it is with life comes death.

I like this idea anyway, I thought about what I'd like to happen when the time comes and honestly I don't like the idea of being buried or cremated, so this seems like a much more constructive plan.

Your line 'what I cannot accomplish in life I can partially contribute in death' gets me, that's really beautiful. I've always felt I will never fulfil my lifes potential so I'd like to think when I'm gone someone can learn and progress from me and my body also. Thankyou for inspiring me with this thread. X
03-21-2009, 09:23 PM   #3
GoJohnnyGo
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Hard to say what becomes of such a thing. I imagine for the most part, the cadaver donation serves as a learning ground for overall anatomy. If someone is then inspired to dwelve more into obstructed intestine, all the better, I suppose.
03-21-2009, 09:39 PM   #4
Colt
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Unfortunately there's practically no use of corpses for scientific research anymore. Even if you have something interesting wrong with you it'll be no more than a passing attraction as they continue through the tour. Donating your body to science really just means one thing, and possibly a second.

1. Medical students will dissect you. They go in, look around, and that's pretty much it. If you've ever taken a college level biology lab and encountered frogs, cats, and such you should be pretty familiar with how this plays out. The students get really nervous and try their best not to run out of the classroom or hurl. They don't always succeed. Then they get a little comfortable and then quickly become too comfortable and start playing with their specimen and giggling all the time so that their professor has to yell at them for being immature and disrespectful.

2. Your bones may end up as decoration in a science classroom where no one will really understand the concept of it being a real person's remains. If they did they would freak out and parents would come marching on the school with torches and pitch forks. (Yeah, I went with the Frankenstein joke. What are you going to do about it? Huh? :P)

It's just not my thing. If my body was actually going to be used to do some research I'd be all for it but I've just not been pleased with how people behave with scientific body donations and I honestly don't think it'll do a lot of good.

All it does is try to get med students over the shock of messing with people's insides and death. I think the same thing can be accomplished by making them clean the corpses after death and by having them sit in on surgeries. I've done both and I assure you it will give you all the necessary nightmares without ruining the organ donation opportunities.

Speaking of organ donation.. I find it odd how obsessed they are with the eyes. Most people's eyes are cut out within a few minutes of death. The eye collectors will even sit just outside the room waiting for you if they think you're going to die soon. They may or may not take anything else, but they always want the eyes. The eyes are usually gone before we get a chance to draw their post-mortem blood. Just plain creepy.
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Last edited by Colt; 03-21-2009 at 09:41 PM.
03-21-2009, 09:45 PM   #5
GoJohnnyGo
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Hey, I'm all for the cheap laughs too. I'm dead. Boom-badda-boom.

Whomever has to handle my estate doesn't have to worry about disposal costs. I'm leaving my estate to the Canadian Crohn's Foundation. I have no heirs. No one will lament my passing.

That's why it works for me.
03-21-2009, 09:50 PM   #6
Colt
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Yeah, frankly it doesn't matter what happens to me either. I don't bother thinking about it because no matter what happens it's going to be impossible for me to care. I just generally don't like how corpses are usually handled in the US. It seems like such a waste. A lot of effort went into making that body. It should feed some starving children or something.
03-21-2009, 09:56 PM   #7
GoJohnnyGo
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I figure I'm pretty much gone in the next couple of years. Just tryin' to cover my bases.
03-22-2009, 12:07 AM   #8
DanM
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GoJohnnyGo said:
I figure I'm pretty much gone in the next couple of years. Just tryin' to cover my bases.
Yeah, well I hope that you will be kicking around for a few more decades. Lets not give up just yet!

Dan
01-31-2014, 11:14 PM   #9
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My sister and I both have Crohn's disease although mine has been in remission for many years. She is currently in the hospital and not expected to survive the night. She wants to donate her body for Crohn's research. She got real bad real quick, it donation of her body even possible at this late stage?
02-01-2014, 12:00 AM   #10
Gmama
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Oh beachready I'm so sorry to hear about your sister! This has to be so hard for you and your family. I'm sorry that I can't answer you question but sending thoughts and prayers your way.
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02-01-2014, 07:08 PM   #11
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I think that people who donate their body to science are incredible really. Its not to everyones taste obviously but if you are fully aware of what to expect to happen to your body and you want to then i think you should! What you said about contributing in death was touching! I hope that you still stay with us for longer than you think

Colt- As a medical student i can say that there are really strict regulations when it comes to respecting the cadavers. In my 3 years of studying cadavers i have never seen a student disrespect a cadaver and it is well known that if you did you would most probs get chucked out of med school (and some students have been).
Yes a few people faint here and there but that is a natural reaction to anything on this level, its not something you see every day!
People assume that we are just given free range to go ahead and dig around but it is quite the opposite. At my university we have a main tutor who guides us through the anatomy of the body, so it isn't just a hey off you go have a rummage.

As far as the bodies we have, they can only be kept up to 3 years and unless you have specifically said hey u can keep my bone for ever, then all remains are cremated and another funeral service held. We even have bins so that any bits being dissected stay with that particular body.

I know its not for everyone, i mean I'm not sure i would even do it! But i can say that personally it has helped my learning at medicine a tremendous amount, its the only time i get to see some real life anatomy other than surgery and tbh if i didn't have anatomy teaching before i went to surgery i wouldn't know what anything was! it never looks like the book says it does haha!
I have helped clean fresh corpses and sat in on many surgeries but nothing can help you understand the human body than seeing it all there for your own eyes, so personally i still think it is pretty useful.

BeachReady - Im sorry to hear your sister is so unwell and i hope she isn't in too much pain. My thoughts and prayers are with you and your family.

i found this off the human tissue authority website:
Under the Human Tissue Act 2004, written and witnessed consent for anatomical examination must be given prior to death; consent cannot be given by anyone else after your death. A consent form can be obtained from your nearest medical school and a copy should be kept with your Will. You should also inform your family, close friends and GP that you wish to donate your body.

Hope that helps answer your question.
08-23-2017, 08:05 PM   #12
Libbylu42
 
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This is what I plan on doing. For someone in my circumstance, it actually works out well. I've filled out my form with the local university (which happens to be an important Crohn's research faculty). I won't have a standard funeral, obviously, but I will get two memorial services paid for. I don't even mind medical students poking about with my bits and parts. My hope is that someone will learn something along the way, and what I cannot accomplish in life I can partially contribute in death.

Sorry for being so morbid. I just want to tie up the loose ends ahead of time.
How do I do this
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