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11-06-2013, 02:17 PM   #31
33WIV
 
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I totally now what it's like to be limited I was in the middle of training for a marathon when I started gettin sick. Now I've had to put my active life on hold for the moment till I can get everything under control. I was also told that I may run into issues with applying for peace corp but I still have hopes.
11-06-2013, 02:42 PM   #32
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Are you able to do any type of exercising at all? I like to workout because it helps take my mind off of things and relieve stress but I haven't been able to figure out which ones are okay. I have arthritis also so running hurts my joints. I have a lot of bottom problems so I can't bicycle and I can't do anything to hard on my abs because it just makes my tummy pain worse.
11-06-2013, 02:54 PM   #33
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I myself haven't been able to, other then easy low incline half a day hikes. I have yet to try swimming. Some easy laps at a slow speed should be fine. Swimming might help arthritis if you care to give it a try.
11-06-2013, 03:02 PM   #34
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I would have to learn to swim first Lol. I've also heard yoga is good at easing pain but I'm kind of afraid to try it.
11-06-2013, 07:58 PM   #35
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Yoga does help! I'm in school full time and get very stressed out. Yoga helped me de-stress and relax. The pain was so much less when I was taking a yoga class. My husband says yoga NEEDS to be a part of my life now! ha
11-06-2013, 08:50 PM   #36
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Thanks! I'll have to go ahead & try it. Is there any form or yoga that's best?
11-07-2013, 12:19 PM   #37
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I am 26 years old and I would consider myself a "young adult". I have had Crohn's for half of my life now (began suffering symptoms at 13). It looks like there are people who have had Crohn's from a young age all the way to being newly diagnosed in this forum.

I have had a wide range of experiences with medications and surgeries. I have had three small bowel resections, appendectomy, and a Cholecystectomy. I have had strictures, ulcers, etc.. I have been on Pentasa, 6mp, Remicade, and Humira (just to name a few).

That being said....
- What "young adult" type situations has IBD/Crohns affected for you?
I feel Crohn's has affected me as a young adult differently than it did when I was younger. As I grow up I am focused more on my entire future and quality of life. I am single young female and meeting someone who understands the possible consequences of Crohn's disease in the long term future is very important. There is no cure (although remission is possible). Crohn's disease can attack from your esophagus all the way through the rectum.
- Has IBD affected your educational opportunities and choices?
I graduated college and was hospitalized several times, but it never affected my education.
- Has IBD affected your independence from your family?
No, this may be because I was diagnosed at a young age. I had already learned to live with the disease.
- Has IBD affected your social relationships, dating, or your body image?
Yes, definitely does. Road trips, restaurants, house parties, etc. It is a constant worry about having to urgently use the restroom. Dating.... When entering a relationship it is hard to convey your condition to the other person w/o being embarressed. Which you should not be embarressed about.
- How do you think dealing with IBD as a young adult is different from dealing with it as a child or an adult?
Being diagnosed at a young age, you know that you are sick and it is something that you have to deal with. As an adult you come to fully realize the long term consequences and trouble that the disease can cause. You have to work consciously to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Here is one thing about Crohn's disease that I have had to deal with lately...
Crohn's disease is always changing. Your symptoms change. 13 years after showing my first symptoms of Crohn's disease, I started suffering from symptoms I had not experienced before. After a routine colonoscopy (Yes, you need ROUTINE procedures) my Crohn's disease has spread from my small bowel to the perennial region too. My doctor and I are discussing new treatment options. Cimzia seems to be the next drug in line.

I hope everyone knows they should not be embarrassed about their condition. This was one thing I learned from my teenage years moving into adulthood.
11-07-2013, 01:33 PM   #38
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- What "young adult" type situations has IBD/Crohns affected for you?
For me I'm not sure what to classify as a "young adult" situation. I wasn't able to go out and party for my 21st birthday (or any other birthday)

- Has IBD affected your educational opportunities and choices?
Definitely. Since I had my first flare mid semester my freshman of college I was dropped from my classes because I could't get there to fill out medical leave papers. Being dropped resulted in F's in my classes so I'm no longer eligible for financial assistance so I have to pay for it on my own and I can only afford 1 or 2 classes at a time.

- Has IBD affected your independence from your family?
Yes. I had just moved out on my own when I got sick and i lost my job and had to move back in with my mom. She loved it but I hate it because now she treats me like I can't take care of myself. I'm in the process of moving out now and she's sad which makes me sad.

- Has IBD affected your social relationships, dating, or your body image?
Yes and No. I can't go everywhere I want to go and I'm not a fan of my body anymore because I feel like I'm either always to skinny from being sick or too fat from dreaded preds. As far as dating goes though I was already with my boyfriend when I started going through all of this so he pretty much went through it with me so to speak. He's very supportive and goes to all of my appointments with me and tries to learn as much as he can so he can take care of me when he needs to.

- How do you think dealing with IBD as a young adult is different from dealing with it as a child or an adult?
I'm pretty sure I had Crohn's when I was younger because I remember having a lot of these symptoms just milder. The difference for me would be is that now people believe me. When I was younger my pediatrician told my mom I just wanted attention (I think that's why my mom is so overly caring now). Turning into an adult it's easier to deal with. I know NOW that it's nothing to be embarrassed about and I'm not afraid to ask for help when I need it.
11-07-2013, 03:26 PM   #39
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I'm a 21 year old guy from the UK, got diagnosed in august after finishing university in june.

- What "young adult" type situations has IBD affected for you?
This post-uni year was supposed to involve firstly getting a job, then saving up to travel for 3-4 months. While workingi was going to spend the weekends visiting my friends at their various universities. I have very few friends in my home town but loads who are in other cities. The uncertainty and fear that crohns has given me has meant that i havnt visited a single one of those friends. Maintaining those friendships is difficult since my only contact is now online through facebook etc.

Meanwhile, the plan to go travelling is down the drain, or more optimistically on hiatus.

I'm working a 9-5 job mon to friday living at home but my weekends pretty much involve staying at home watching movies etc, with the occasional meet up with the few friends i have around here when they're not busy.

- Has IBD affected your educational opportunities and choices?
Fortunately i finished university before i got diagnosed, doing my final year of uni with this disease simply wouldnt have happened. It was the hardest thing i've ever done in my life and that was when i was 100% healthy. That's one thing i can always be thankful for when it comes to this disease.

- Has IBD affected your independence from your family?

The plan was always to be living at home at this stage anyway, but with the prospect of travellingin a few months it wouldn't have been so bad. I'd be bored but i'd have something to look forward to. Now i'm living at home and i'm bored with nothing to look forward to.
That said, my mum has been doing everything she possibly can to help me with this disease - cooking for me, helping me make my SCD food, shopping, cleaning. I get home from work and I crash - i can't possibly imagine doing all those chores on my own whilst having my current job. I feel pretty dependent and as a result, despite being bored here and having no life, my desire to move out has dropped dramatically and im extremely thankful for what my parents are doing for me.

- Has IBD affected your social relationships, dating, or your body image?

Social relationships as mentioned before, it's hard to maintain relationships with my old uni friends since i've made so many empty promises to go and visit them and it's never been possible.
Dating - well i pretty much just dont have any interest in women at the moment, I just don't have the energy or desire anymore, which is kind of tragic is suppose.
Body image is a huge one for me. I spent the 2 years before my diagnosis working out, lifting weights, and went from a skinny little runt to a fairly muscular, healthy looking physique. In less than 2 months all of that progress was lost and i am back to being skinny and small. It's devastating that i've lost something that became such a big part of my life (sounds lame but going to the gym was one of my favourite hobbies).

- Do you feel as if IBD has matured you beyond your age or for kept you from maturing in any way?

Not sure about this one, except that i'm like an old man when it comes to my leisure time lol. Would much rather have a relaxed night in than go out. That's another aspect of my personality i lost actually - I absolutely loved going clubbing and to gigs, now the idea of going out makes me think of discomfort, pain, and uncertainty.

- How do you think dealing with IBD as a young adult is different from dealing with it as a child or an adult?

I suppose i'm fairly lucky in some ways that i only became ill this year, a childhood with crohn's sounds like a sad time and i feel sorry for those poor kids As for adults i dont know really, unfortunately i don't know any adults with crohn's who are coping with life/employment/family etc. I'd be interested in talking to any older people with crohn's about their lives (by older i mean anyone older than me, not necessarily 40+ etc)
11-07-2013, 03:43 PM   #40
rygon
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- What "young adult" type situations has IBD affected for you?
I guess the only differences in me being an adult is job wise. I was diagnosed at 24 so only been affected as a young adult. Luckily work have helped me (although some individuals could have cared/helped more). I think the hardest part is, these years are supposed to be the best years of your life, yet all i'm bothered about is where the nearest toilet is

- Has IBD affected your educational opportunities and choices?
Had to take 2 years off from my distant learning maths degree. Knock on effect is that I have forgotten most of it now i've started up again and having to take time (i havent got) to relearn it all
-Has IBD affected your independence from your family?
No I've always been fiercely independent. My parent live in Aus (im in UK) and I have lived on my own for a fair few years so I'm used to it. Luckily I stayed employed so could keep living in my own house.

- Has IBD affected your social relationships, dating, or your body image? Gets quite a bit disheartening when ppl say you have piled on the pounds when all it is is bloating. Also sucks when you are driving with a girl you fancy, only to have to stop at the nearest woods to go to the toilet. Definitely hard to be confident and date when knowing you are either ill, or could become ill at any time

- Do you feel as if IBD has matured you beyond your age or for kept you from maturing in any way?
I'm more cautious, but I'm still the same naive me

- How do you think dealing with IBD as a young adult is different from dealing with it as a child or an adult?
As a child you have others to help and comfort you. As an adult you hope you have a stable job and relationship, and understand who you are, what you want to be etc. As a young adult you are supposed to have the whole world ahead of you. Its an exciting time where you want to do the best you can, and do what you want care free.
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11-07-2013, 03:44 PM   #41
valleysangel92
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I'm 20 , will turn 21 next month , I was diagnosed last year at age 19 after dropping out of university due to my symptoms.

- What "young adult" type situations has IBD affected for you?

University - during the short time I was there, it was hard to concentrate in lectures, and my flat mates werent very understanding of my situation, they would come in making lots of noise at 3 am even when I'd just been let home from hospital.

It then meant I had to leave university and has kept me from being able to return.

- Has IBD affected your educational opportunities and choices?

Yes, I was at university when it hit badly.. I had to leave and lost my chance to return , and my education is still on hold.

- Has IBD affected your independence from your family?

Yes. I had to move back home from a uni flat and I can't cook for myself or anything, it's taking a long time to get my independence back.

- Has IBD affected your social relationships, dating, or your body image?

I dont see my friends as often as I used to. It has caused me and my boyfriend a lot of stress, but we have got through it together and we are stronger for it, it's made me rely on him more than normal at early stages of the relationship but it has shown us that we can cope with whatever gets thrown at us.

- Do you feel as if IBD has matured you beyond your age or for kept you from maturing in any way?

I feel I was already matured more than normal since I had other health conditions, but I think the symptoms of IBD contributed to that.

- How do you think dealing with IBD as a young adult is different from dealing with it as a child or an adult?[/QUOTE]

I think as a child, many of the choices are made for you, you may not get as much of a say in your treatment and it can be harder to communicate your needs. I think as a young adult, you may not always feel ready for the choices that you have to make and there is additional pressure to go out, party, drink etc which some find hard to handle. I think younger people can feel more pressure to look a certain way and it can be harder to find someone who is ready to deal with your illness as a friend or partner .
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coeliac disease/Osteopenia /Crohns/Arthritis/
laperoscopic hemicolectomy 25/06/ 2013

Meds- Vedolizumab, sulfasalazine, Lansoprazole, Vitamin D, prochlorperazine, Oramorph, MST, B12 shots My journey with crohns: http://glutenfreecookiemonster.wordpress.com/

Allergic to - inflectra, aza

Non CD meds - Gabapentin, paracetamol, ventolin

Last edited by valleysangel92; 11-19-2013 at 06:48 AM.
11-07-2013, 04:14 PM   #42
hingrum
 
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DamnitCrohns - It sounds like you need to get your energy level up. Once you are able to do this, visiting your friends, travelling, and exercising will be easier. Happiness is key in healthiness. It is proven that exercise improves happiness. I do not want to sound like a hypocrite, bc I too have to make a effort to connect with my friends. When I get home from work, I do not want to leave and I am exhausted! I would encourage you to talk to your doctor about taking supplements to improve your energy. Also, look at foods that promote energy. With Crohns disease your digestive system does not work properly and you do not absorb all the nutrients like a normal system. I have been anemic most of my diagnosed life. I take iron supplements, B12 shots or supplements. Hopefully, once you are able to gain some energy you can continue to do what you love at the gym. Don't be discouraged you will learn the best way to cope with your illness and return to activities you love. It just takes time to adjust to your new life.
11-19-2013, 06:53 AM   #43
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I just wanted to add that some doctors and even other patients can see you as a child still, and therefore may sugar-coat things or maybe even be a little patronizing. Doctors can sometimes look at me and see a young looking girl and think I wont know when I'm being messed around. What they don't realise is that my grandmother was a medical secretary, my uncle is in charge of a team of 250 doctors and nurses and I've been in the health system since I was 12. Plus I did a 2 year health and social care diploma and started a nursing degree. Its quite interesting how things suddenly speed up in the hospital when your uncle has a few stern words with the clinical director .


I've also had nurses walk straight past me thinking that my mum or dad were the patient, since I 'look too young' to be in an adult ward or need such a big operation. I tend to get mothered a lot by the other patients on the ward, some in a nice, caring, sweet way, some in a nosey, interfering way.
11-19-2013, 11:41 AM   #44
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Hey guys. I'm 21 and currently in college. I was just diagnosed a month ago, and it has turned my world upside down. What I was hoping would be my last year of partying and being a college student is gone for sure, and since I go to a small college (fewer than 2000 students), it's very difficult to escape the party scene. Friday and Saturday nights I can't fall asleep before 3-4 in the morning due to the noise, but I'm afraid to move out of my apartment because I don't want to distance myself from my friends further than I already have to. I'm falling behind in my schoolwork, research, and job search as well...its hard to use all my energy on these things when I'm not getting the chance to do the things I love.

I want to turn this into a good thing. Before I was diagnosed I was not productive: I drank and partied too much and it got in the way of other things I wanted to accomplish. I want to refocus myself, but I've underestimated how much these flares impact my day to day life.

I went through a period of depression a couple years ago, and was doing so much better...just trying hard to stay on top of all this and do what I can to keep my energy up...but obviously it's tough. Going through this alone sucks...
11-19-2013, 11:45 AM   #45
SarahBear
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Hey guys. I'm 21 and currently in college. I was just diagnosed a month ago, and it has turned my world upside down. What I was hoping would be my last year of partying and being a college student is gone for sure, and since I go to a small college (fewer than 2000 students), it's very difficult to escape the party scene. Friday and Saturday nights I can't fall asleep before 3-4 in the morning due to the noise, but I'm afraid to move out of my apartment because I don't want to distance myself from my friends further than I already have to. I'm falling behind in my schoolwork, research, and job search as well...its hard to use all my energy on these things when I'm not getting the chance to do the things I love.

I want to turn this into a good thing. Before I was diagnosed I was not productive: I drank and partied too much and it got in the way of other things I wanted to accomplish. I want to refocus myself, but I've underestimated how much these flares impact my day to day life.

I went through a period of depression a couple years ago, and was doing so much better...just trying hard to stay on top of all this and do what I can to keep my energy up...but obviously it's tough. Going through this alone sucks...
I'm sorry to hear what you're going through, but it definitely gets better. A month isn't very long to adjust and cope - you'll get the hang of things. How long were you showing symptoms before your diagnosis?

Is the inability to sleep affecting your schoolwork, or is it only a minor issue since it's on the weekend? Have you tried a mild sleep aid?
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11-19-2013, 01:31 PM   #46
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I agree with Sarah Bear. I would not expect anyone to be able to cope with the diagnosis after one month. I find myself 13 years later still coping with symptoms of Crohn's disease. The way I cope now has definitely changed from the time I was first diagnosed.

Just because of your diagnosis does not mean you have to stop doing what you love. A huge part of Crohn's disease is knowing your limits. I have found a lot of my medications have a side effect of drowsiness. It is important for me to get good sleep at night so I can save my energy for what I have to do during the day. You can still go out with your friends, but you may have to go home earlier and/or not drink as much or at all. It is hard to discipline yourself with limits. I struggled with this too in college. Good Luck! I hope you are able to get back on track!
11-20-2013, 01:00 PM   #47
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SarahBear - I was diagnosed within a couple weeks of showing symptoms. Both of my parents have an IBD so the red flags went up fast. I think the bigger thing than sleep affecting my schoolwork is just stress about food (or the lack of food), and the general lack of energy. I know I've only been dealing with this for a short time, I'm really still in part of the initial shock and readjustment stage.
11-20-2013, 01:26 PM   #48
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SarahBear - I was diagnosed within a couple weeks of showing symptoms. Both of my parents have an IBD so the red flags went up fast. I think the bigger thing than sleep affecting my schoolwork is just stress about food (or the lack of food), and the general lack of energy. I know I've only been dealing with this for a short time, I'm really still in part of the initial shock and readjustment stage.
That is an incredibly quick diagnosis! Sorry to hear your parents have to deal with this as well.

Are you having trouble with your appetite, keeping food down, or general broke college student problems in that area? If it's Crohn's related, you may be able to find advice around the forum to help (I'll link you if I find any threads). Otherwise… let me know if you figure that one out, because I'm in the same boat.

Hopefully being familiar with the condition will help you adjust more easily.
11-29-2013, 04:09 AM   #49
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Hello! Happy to find this group. I am 24 and newly diagnosed with crohn's...

Before my diagnosis earlier this month I was severely anemic and had to get a blood transfusion. I had a nurse say: "What are you doing here? Usually the people who need blood transfusions are really old."

Thanks. Comforting.

I am lucky that I made it through undergrad before I started having symptoms. I really feel for those of you still in school dealing with this! That would have been a huge challenge during an already challenging time!

I moved back home with my mom this year...Was planning to save money and pursue an MFA next year. While it feels like crohn's picked a pretty good time to show up, when I've already graduated and am with my family, I feel pretty freaked about moving forward and trying to go to school next year.
11-29-2013, 04:39 AM   #50
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Welcome! We are thankful to have you join us Magnolia!
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Pentasa 1000mg 2xday or Mesalamine DR 1.2gm 2xday, Canasa Suppositories (when needed) 1000mg 1xday, Tylenol 3 with codeine 300-30mg (when needed)

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600+D Calcium 2xday, Multivitamin, 65mg Iron 1xday, Fish Oil 1000mg, Vitamin D3 5,000 I.U., Eye Drops 2xday


UP Support Group http://www.crohnsforum.com/showthread.php?t=68350
11-29-2013, 01:52 PM   #51
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I have a friend who has been researching crohns for a year now he has a YouTube blog called life in the crapper. he's been doing some interesting treatments if you want to check it out he also suggested a book called breaking the visions cycle. It pretty good.
12-01-2013, 04:23 PM   #52
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Heyyy everyone! 23 year old from Kent, UK. My crohn's disease started when I was 4 but I wasn't diagnosed until I was 11. Okay, I'll have a go at the questions too...

- What "young adult" type situations has IBD affected for you?
--> I have never been in remission since my disease started unfortunately, so I just try to manage it as best I can. I do most things I want to, I just have to adapt. I cannot go out two nights in a row like my friends can as I tend to suffer with mouth ulcers after too much drinking, and I am always tired for a week after! I work part time as I found working full time too exhausting.

- Has IBD affected your educational opportunities and choices?
--> I struggled through my A Levels and wanted to go to university so managed that too. I am quite stubborn so I was determined not to let it beat me! It has definitely affected my career opportunities more than it did during my years at school/university. Ideally I would like to work in London but I think the commute would be too tiring.

- Has IBD affected your independence from your family?
--> I still live at home and haven't thought too much about moving out yet - I guess I will deal with that a little later. My family are extremely supportive though which is great.

- Has IBD affected your social relationships, dating, or your body image?
--> Luckily I haven't let it stop me - my ex boyfriend was very understanding so there were no real issues. I try not to let it take over my life - I guess as I cannot really remember a time before I had the disease I don't know any different. I know a few people that have been diagnosed as adults who feel quite differently though.

- Do you feel as if IBD has matured you beyond your age or for kept you from maturing in any way?
--> I guess it has matured me in a sense, as it stops me being as spontaneous as I would like to be sometimes - living with the disease requires more planning and being cautious. But I believe it shouldn't stop you doing anything you want to do within reason... just a case of adapting. For example, I attend festivals for days but do not risk camping for the entire weekend in case I am feeling too unwell.

- How do you think dealing with IBD as a young adult is different from dealing with it as a child or an adult?
--> I was always a pretty easy going child so just accepted what the doctors and my parents told me and didn't really question things too much. I found it easier as a child - as an adult I feel it affects me more, I am very aware of the limitations it imposes. It has stopped me being able to work full time, which is very frustrating to say the least!

Nice to read other people's thoughts! Hope you're all good x
12-03-2013, 12:08 PM   #53
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Does anyone have crohns and learning disability's?
12-03-2013, 04:01 PM   #54
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I'm not sure if I had a learning disability. But, I did have a horrible time in school. While in college, I was sent to some sort of place where they test your learning abilities. I believe if I remember right that they told me that I seemed to use the right side of my brain more than my left.
12-03-2013, 06:40 PM   #55
JustAYoungLad
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Crohn's robs us all of our dreams. I'm trying to get better and then experience life.

I would be interested to know how has Crohns affected you all with fulfilling your ambitions in life? Work, travel, relationships, social, moving out?

My goal is when I'm better to just hit the road, drive to Dover in the south of UK and hit the open road in Europe, a see where I end up type situation. That's one of my ambitions but it's not going to happen any time soon :/ Its on the list though.
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12-03-2013, 06:53 PM   #56
valleysangel92
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Crohn's robs us all of our dreams. I'm trying to get better and then experience life.

I would be interested to know how has Crohns affected you all with fulfilling your ambitions in life? Work, travel, relationships, social, moving out?

My goal is when I'm better to just hit the road, drive to Dover in the south of UK and hit the open road in Europe, a see where I end up type situation. That's one of my ambitions but it's not going to happen any time soon :/ Its on the list though.
At the moment, crohns has had a pretty big impact on my ambitions, like it's been my dream to be a specialist nurse for children since I was about 13/14 and I was just getting settled into uni with that dream becoming a reality, and then wham, massive flare (I was undiagnosed at the time) . I may never be able to train as a nurse now, but I will still work with children in some way if I can, I am determined of that. If it is possible to be a nurse then I will.

Relationships wise, it's made it hard to see my boyfriend regularly and do 'couple ' things like eating out and going to movies, but we are strong , and if you find the right person you can really make it work. moving out will be difficult, especially since I'm very close to my family, but I think we can find a way to deal with that .

I think it is good to have goals, I still want to do all the things I did before, go to uni (to be a nurse if I can) , be independent, have a good job , get married, have kids etc, it just might take me a little longer to get those things than it would of before. I think we should make the most of our good days /weeks /months because we can't be sure how long they will stay good for, and I think having goals to work toward is part of that.

For example, I'm going on holiday without my parents for the first time at New year (my bf is taking me) and although I've stayed away from them before (uni, school stuff), this is the first time since I was diagnosed, and it's been keeping me going lately while I've been flaring, as something to get to and something I can enjoy and just be like a normal 21 year old (Im 21 on the 26 th of this month) . To 'normal ' healthy young adults, this might not be a big deal, but to me it's a light at the end of the tunnel and it's keeping me positive. So no matter how big or small, goals and things to reach are good.
12-03-2013, 07:18 PM   #57
JustAYoungLad
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At the moment, crohns has had a pretty big impact on my ambitions, like it's been my dream to be a specialist nurse for children since I was about 13/14 and I was just getting settled into uni with that dream becoming a reality, and then wham, massive flare (I was undiagnosed at the time) . I may never be able to train as a nurse now, but I will still work with children in some way if I can, I am determined of that. If it is possible to be a nurse then I will.
There is definitely a good chance of you becoming a nurse. In fact one of the nurses on my ward had Crohn's, so I believe the NHS definitely employee nurses with Crohn's. Although I don't know, if he was a nurse before hand. I imagine its just getting the training over with, I'm not sure how long a nursing degree is but any degree is a big commitment and has potential stress from exams and coursework. I would keep very optimistic, you never know where you will be in a years time.

A back up could be a primary school teacher, potentially? I know it's much easier than training to be a nurse. I did some teaching as a placement from university for 8 weeks and it really opened my eyes to the school environment as an adult and would probably consider it in the future.

For example, I'm going on holiday without my parents for the first time at New year (my bf is taking me) and although I've stayed away from them before (uni, school stuff), this is the first time since I was diagnosed, and it's been keeping me going lately while I've been flaring, as something to get to and something I can enjoy and just be like a normal 21 year old (Im 21 on the 26 th of this month) . To 'normal ' healthy young adults, this might not be a big deal, but to me it's a light at the end of the tunnel and it's keeping me positive. So no matter how big or small, goals and things to reach are good.
So you get Christmas day and then your birthday? December must be your favourite month

I know what you means, you don't realise all the little things you take for granted. That will be nice though, going away for the new year with your bf. Starting 2014 as you mean to go on!
12-03-2013, 07:31 PM   #58
valleysangel92
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It's not the working, it's getting a uni to accept me, like I got rejected this year (after my op, before I started flaring again) because I failed the occupational health assessment , plus there's money, I can't afford to pay the prescription charges in England and the Welsh unis seem less understanding about health issues, you miss time = they kick you out.. My uni was amazing, but they just couldn't hold my place, the course is 3 years and you do a mix of theory and placements, it's a very intense course and I'd not be able to cope with the placements while flaring if it was a bad flare, plus my uni expressed concern over my immune system (I have another auto immune condition) and the occupational health team are concerned about my other health issues ( possible arthritis, tachycardia, high levels of calcium in my blood stream etc) and they were also concerned about working on a kids ward if you're taking immunosuppressive meds ( high incidence of meningitis etc) .. I'm not sure about teaching, it's hard to get jobs these days and it's a lot of work. I haven't given up on being a nurse, but there are a lot of hurdles to get past. I've done placements in schools when I was in college , and loved it, but teaching itself is sooo different, although a classroom assistant appeals to me.. Or working with special needs children.. I've also considered being a play therapist. So I have options and I will keep an open mind



Haha yeah and my brother is 2 day's after me :P expensive for our family.

Yeah exactly, some people think it's so easy to do all this stuff, like I envy people who can just get up and go.. Yeah I'm gonna go shopping/cinema/school/etc today .
12-03-2013, 11:10 PM   #59
Essieluv
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I'll be twenty soon. I was diagnosed when I was sixteen, and I can honestly say that I am not the same person anymore. Not that that's a bad thing, lol. I think what messes with me the most is that I can't drive because of how sick I am. I am a very independent person, so that is really hard for me to accept. And then my friends are always pestering me about why I should drive, it's hard because they don't understand. Sorry, that turned into a little vent session.
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12-04-2013, 11:32 AM   #60
hingrum
 
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I have been very lucky. I finished college and have a great job that allows me to be out whenever I need without any consequence. I am not sure what "occupational health assessment" is at a University, but it sounds like BS. I travel some, but I do not let sickness get in the way of it. I make sure if I get the "urge" to go, I go ahead and stop at a rest stop rather than try to wait. There have been a couple of times where I had to stop on the side of the road! Embarrassing! I have never told anyone ever! I moved on though. Shit happens.
Crohn's disease has not robbed me of my dreams.....yet. I do worry it one day will. I am 26 and I want to get married and have children. If the newest form of treatment I am on does not work, I will need to seek help from experimental drugs where the effects are unknown. I fear that could have a negative impact on my ability to have kids.
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