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Crohn's Disease Forum » Books, Multimedia, Research & News » New Study Suggests Dehydroascorbic Acid


12-05-2013, 10:28 PM   #1
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New Study Suggests Dehydroascorbic Acid

A new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests that dietary dehydroascorbic acid, the oxidized form of vitamin C, might be useful for some Crohn's patients. Researchers at the University of Manitoba, Canada, studied the gene that codes for the transporter of the common form of vitamin C called ascorbic acid and found that a specific polymorphism was more prevalent in Crohn's patients than in controls. "If, as we hypothesize, intracellular ascorbate concentrations of specific intestinal cell types will decrease by the action of SNPs in SLC23A1, a supplementation with dehydroascorbate would be worthy of study as the therapy of choice to compensate for this shortfall...supplemented externally, dehydroascorbate enters the cell through facilitated glucose transporter of the GLUT family, not SLC23A1...the proposed gene-specific personalized nutritional therapy would boost intracellular vitamin C concentrations and be considered safe."
doi: 10.3945/ajcn.113.068015
12-05-2013, 11:06 PM   #2
Trysha
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Thank you for posting this interesting report

Was there any mention of vitamin C and renal failure?
There are reports of Vit C increasing creatinine levels.
12-07-2013, 06:35 PM   #3
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Was there any mention of vitamin C and renal failure? There are reports of Vit C increasing creatinine levels.
Although it has been hypothesized that regular megadosing of vitamin C could increase the risk of kidney stones (due to increased oxalate excretion), to the best of my knowledge no study has ever shown this to be the case. I have never heard of a study that suggests vitamin C in any doses could cause renal failure or high serum creatinine levels, but would appreciate the reference if you know of one.

This report is a genetic study, not a clinical trial, so none of the 463 subjects were given any vitamin C. The study didn't propose large doses of common vitamin C (ascorbic acid), instead they propose using the alternate form of vitamin C (dehydroascorbic acid). Cells can absorb it even if their transporters for ascorbic acid do not function, because dehydroascorbic acid is absorbed using a different type of transporter. Only typical (RDA) amounts would be needed.
07-22-2014, 11:45 PM   #4
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For those interested in evaluating it, a new video teaches how to make do-it-yourself dehydroascorbic acid for the diet. Google "" to locate this video on YouTube.

Last edited by Jennifer; 07-26-2014 at 07:24 PM. Reason: Search removed
07-23-2014, 01:39 AM   #5
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Exactly how much more common is this polymorphism? Vitamin C is already a particularly overconsumed nutrient because of the shadow of Linus Pauling so I wonder what the exact value of this is.
07-23-2014, 02:04 AM   #6
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Thank you for posting this interesting report

Was there any mention of vitamin C and renal failure?
There are reports of Vit C increasing creatinine levels.
Conclusion

1) High-dose vitamin C can induce hyperoxaluric nephropathy and progressive renal failure, especially if aggravated by diarrhea, oxalate-rich diet, metabolic acidosis, and dehydration. 2) The diagnosis should be suspected in unexplained renal insufficiency when associated with these risk factors. 3) Since prompt treatment could avert end-stage renal disease, we recommend monitoring urinary oxalate in patients on high-dose vitamin C and renal biopsy if necessary.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2235877/

In some people, vitamin C might cause nausea, vomiting, heartburn, stomach cramps, headache, and other side effects. The chance of getting these side effects increases the more vitamin C you take. Amounts higher than 2000 mg per day are POSSIBLY UNSAFE and may cause a lot of side effects, including kidney stones and severe diarrhea. In people who have had a kidney stone, amounts greater than 1000 mg per day greatly increase the risk of kidney stone recurrence.
Special precautions & warnings:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Vitamin C is LIKELY SAFE for pregnant or breast-feeding women when taken in the recommended amount of 120 mg per day. Taking too much vitamin C during pregnancy can cause problems for the newborn baby.

Angioplasty, a heart procedure: Avoid taking supplements containing vitamin C or other antioxidant vitamins (beta-carotene, vitamin E) immediately before and following angioplasty without the supervision of a health care professional. These vitamins seem to interfere with proper healing.

Cancer: Cancerous cells collect high concentrations of vitamin C. Until more is known, only use high doses of vitamin C under the direction of your oncologist.

Diabetes: Vitamin C might raise blood sugar. In older women with diabetes, vitamin C in amounts greater than 300 mg per day increases the risk of death from heart disease. Do not take vitamin C in doses greater than those found in basic multivitamins.

Blood-iron disorders, including conditions called “thalassemia” and “hemochromatosis”: Vitamin C can increase iron absorption, which might make these conditions worse. Avoid large amounts of vitamin C.

Kidney stones, or a history of kidney stones: Large amounts of vitamin C can increase the chance of getting kidney stones. Do not take vitamin C in amounts greater than those found in basic multivitamins.

A metabolic deficiency called “glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency” (G6PDD): Large amounts of vitamin C can cause red blood cells to break in people with this condition. Avoid excessive amounts of vitamin C.

Sickle cell disease: Vitamin C might make this condition worse. Avoid using large amounts of vitamin C.
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/d...ural/1001.html


In the link above it also talks about how it can interact with certain medications and herbs.

Dehydroascorbic acid is an oxidized form of ascorbic acid so I imagine that mega doses could still possibly have similar side effects as ascorbic acid but I can't find any helpful studies yet and can't find the link to where you got the information either Researcher unless this is it but I can only see the abstract: http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/99...2-f70d7a90315e
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07-24-2014, 06:18 PM   #7
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Despite Jennifer's remarkable compilation of every negative aspect of vitamin C that has ever been speculated, it remains a dietary component that is not only absolutely essential for every human being's existence, but is also among the safest to consume. If I suffered from Crohn's Disease, and a scientific research study suggested that I might gain alleviation of some symptoms in such a simple, inexpensive, and safe way, I'm pretty sure I would be willing to give it try. Once again, if you want to try dietary dehydroascorbic acid, you should seek out the YouTube video that teaches you how to make dehydroascorbic acid, do-it-yourself at home, by searching for "."

Last edited by Jennifer; 07-26-2014 at 07:23 PM. Reason: Search removed
07-26-2014, 05:54 PM   #8
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People should be aware of possible side effects of everything and should only use supplements under their doctor's supervision to make sure that they aren't getting mega doses and to make sure that they are capable of taking on extra supplements as it can interact with certain medical conditions, medications and supplements. My job is to look after everyone on the forum and make sure that they are as informed as possible before doing anything that could be potentially harmful. Never blindly supplement. Always use supplements under your doctor's supervision.
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