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Crohn's Disease Forum » General IBD Discussion » What do you think 'caused' your Crohn's?


 
06-29-2009, 09:13 PM   #61
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PUTS ON TIN FOIL HAT.......



It was the aliens and their anal probes......
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06-29-2009, 09:40 PM   #62
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Last September I got 'adult' mono, just means it hits you harder, they had me take a tetanus shot, suffered through November, lots of stress through February, mid-March I began to get symptoms. I'm not diagnosed either, but I definitely think the mono wore down my immune system, the tetanus shot immunization didn't help and the stress kicked it all into high gear.
07-01-2009, 10:53 PM   #63
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Well being a mix of eastern european/jewish and irish. Who for some reason have a greater chance of developing it. Seems by definition i was destined to have it.

Also my father had a bad birth defect as a baby he was born without a rectum they had to make him one (this was back in the 50's).

I always thought that family history played a big part. However what actually "triggered" it I don't know. I had many ear infections growing up as well as lung and throat infections. Then when I was 8-9 I was hit hard in the stomach with an aluminum baseball bat. I really think the trauma kicked it into over drive. I remember when i was younger when I was 5-6 when I ran for soccer I'd get a real bad pain in the sweet spot you guys know what I mean.

As for the "trigger" if i had to lay my money down on a table and guess. I would say stress triggers it.
07-04-2009, 06:41 AM   #64
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i actually had/have no other family members that have any forms of ibd, besides my grandma having a slight cause of collitis and my grandfather on the other side having colon cancer.

i was diagnosed with lyme's disease 3 years before which maybe could've affected my immune system pretty bad? it didn't help that i was 14 at the time and ate garbage every day (like literally garbage! free pizza from the garbage cans at school, and dumpster diving at dunkin donuts). then when i was 17 i did spring track at the high school and really pushed my body. this is when i started noticing some symptoms, i had a few perianal abscesses but since i was young and didn't really know what was going on and i brushed them off as hemorrhoids. later that summer a ridiculously sized one led me to a serious lancing and a colonoscopy follow up.
07-05-2009, 08:45 AM   #65
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I went to Glastonbury festival in 1995, the day I came back I was sat in a pub with my mates when I suddenly needed to run to the toilet, on sitting down my guts let go and exploded in what looked like a gallon of D. Although I quickly recovered the following months got slowly worse until I was hospitalised at Christmas and diagnosed then.

I can't help but think that living on a field for 4 days that is normally kept for dairy cows and not being able to wash properly plus sharing a toilet with 80,000 other dirty people might have played a part in me picking up e-coli or some other nasty that acted as a trigger.

Or the fact my mother put me on cow’s milk too early? Either way my doc says it's genetic with an environmental factor that kicks it off.
07-05-2009, 08:02 PM   #66
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Cows are where the Mycobacterium Avium subspecies Paratuberculosis pathogen comes from. The main suspect bacterium in Crohn's disease.

Dan
07-06-2009, 01:31 AM   #67
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D Bergy said:
Cows are where the Mycobacterium Avium subspecies Paratuberculosis pathogen comes from. The main suspect bacterium in Crohn's disease.

Dan
Yup. ParaTB is where it's at. Somewhere along the line we all had a bad carton of milk, and now we're here on the internet comparing stories about how rapidly our bowels evacuate.
07-06-2015, 03:11 AM   #68
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07-11-2015, 07:56 PM   #69
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Probably an accumulation of poor dietary habits growing up in the 90s as a pre-teen, environmental pollution/ second hand smoke, the amount of tap water I'd freely consume after recess in elementary school (fluoride and other nasties displacing iodine), and not enough quality vegetables.

Oh, and my aunt actually has Crohn's disease; a genetic inheritance? Perhaps had some influence.
07-11-2015, 10:48 PM   #70
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I think first and foremost genetics then as u get older there are triggers if u like that set the disease of and it's usually stress and dietary intake put all 3 together and it tends to be a good platform for an attack
07-11-2015, 11:30 PM   #71
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Nobody in my family has IBD. So in my case, I doubt it's genetic (but it still could be).

I see three potential causes:

1- I've taken loads of antibiotics through the years. I was never seriously ill (until my UC) but was often a little sick (the flu, tonsillitis, otitis, etc) + I had acne problems when I was a teenager. Back then, doctors seemed to prescribe antibiotics as if they were candy. So it might have messed up my gut bacterias.

2- I used to eat a LOT of carbohydrates. All through my childhood and my adult life. And I didn't eat much veggies, even though I liked them. I was too carbohydrate-obsessed! I'd say about 80% of my food intake was carbs. I think this also might have messed up my gut bacterias.

3- I've always suffered from anxiety. It has gotten way worse since I've been stuck with UC but even before, I didn't handle stress well. Things that seemed normal for most people were very scary or uncomfortable to me. I think it may have worn me out in the long run and my body just couldn't take it anymore. I don't believe that could be the main explanation but I do think it may have had a part.

Most likely, those three factors came into play and voilà... UC made an apparition.

I'll never really have the answer. But I'm still trying to improve my gut flora because you never know, right?
07-12-2015, 03:57 AM   #72
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I got Crohn's Disease due to IBS.
Before I was diagnosed with Crohn's, I was suffering with IBS for an year. It got worse & by the time we finally went to Hospital, IBS had upgraded itself to Crohn's.

Infact, I read in some places that if IBS is untreated, it gets severe & goes into directions: Ulcerative Colitis (Infects only large intestine) or Crohn's (infects anywhere from throat to end of Large intestine). In my case, unfortunately it was the big Daddy Crohn's.
07-14-2015, 01:47 PM   #73
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I blame my moms side of the family. My grandma has severe IBS and celiac disorder. My mom has IBS. Her brother got colon cancer and died due to complications caused by it.

But I also think environment is equally an important factor. Childhood and prenatal stressors no doubt have an impact on autoimmune diseases.
07-14-2015, 03:08 PM   #74
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Studies show risk factors for developing crohn's include:

Vitamin d deficiency
Antibiotics
low fiber diet
high sugar diet
high meat diet

and possibly sacharrin, sucralose, and emulsifiers like polysorbate 80, carageenan.
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07-14-2015, 06:14 PM   #75
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I personally think the IBS diagnosis is just what doctors call it when they see a GI disorder, but they can't determine what it really is. I was diagnosed with IBS for years before an ER Doc said it is crohns disease.
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07-15-2015, 05:53 AM   #76
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I personally think the IBS diagnosis is just what doctors call it when they see a GI disorder, but they can't determine what it really is. I was diagnosed with IBS for years before an ER Doc said it is crohns disease.
I think so too. I've not heard of IBS being a risk factor for Crohn's, they're described as unrelated in the official advice I've seen (e.g. NHS web pages), but it seems an awful lot of people get misdiagnosed with IBS before further tests reveal Crohn's later on. If someone has IBS and later gets Crohn's, my guess would be that it's actually been Crohn's all along, and Crohn's would have been diagnosed earlier if enough testing had been done. I think that happens with other diseases too. I've heard more than once of someone being misdiagnosed with IBS which later turned out to be colon cancer.
07-16-2015, 10:40 AM   #77
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As a kid I had a lot of ear and throat infections and was put on anti biotics often.

I also ate toothpaste while playing 'doctor' with my cousin.

I used to get heartburn at a young age from wheat-based sweets like donuts.

It triggered in highschool though, one day I was perfectly fine eating french onion dip, had my first flare mid meal and never got better.

I was doing well on remicade until they put me on acutane, I cant prove causation but I got much worse after acutane and biologics stopped working, I got new symptoms and developed food intolerances which previously didn't exist as long as I was on remicade.

My symptoms got worse after both high sugar and exclusive no-carb dieting because I didn't understand the importance of complex carbs on the micorbiome.
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07-16-2015, 01:28 PM   #78
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I had a urinary tract infection as a infant, and the doctor put me on antibiotics for over a year. My parents didn't know any better to realize that was not appropriate length of time to be on antibiotics. I believe the doctor or my parents were not paying attention. At that point a probiotic milk formula maybe would have been beneficial to offset the damage done by the antibiotics. Although back in the 90's I'm sure that didn't exist.

In addition, dietary habits as a kid and stress/environmental factors helped trigger my first flare at the age of 12. I believe I had minor symptoms leading up to that point. I have no family history of IBD.
07-16-2015, 06:22 PM   #79
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I've always had a "sensitive" stomach with lots of D along the way but what set me off were longish trips to Mexico the first time and Thailand the second. Both times I returned with a bad case of D which went on for months. The first time it resolved itself but the second came with the diagnosis of UC.

No one in my family is affected and I didn't grow up on junk food. I did have may ear infections as a child and heaps of antibiotics for that and also lived in a dairy village for a few years where I played in fields with cow pats etc.
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07-18-2015, 06:07 PM   #80
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Well I've always been notorious for getting sick. When I was a child, I constantly had ear infections & the flu. In high school I got strep throat constantly (so yep been on a lot of antibiotics and meds like aspirin). I also had mono 5 times in my life, one time I had mono & the H1N1 virus at the same time (it was pure HELL). But I really think the reason why I ended up with Crohn's disease is due to my family on my mother's side suffering from IBS / IBD and also both sides of my family have been affected by Colon cancer. I was also trailed on over 30 different psychiatric medications (I'm 24). So yeah I believe that's basically why I'm suffering the way I am now. I always ate decently healthy, rarely ate sweets mostly just veg and low fat meats like chicken and fish. Blah
07-18-2015, 09:05 PM   #81
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My husband's GI said its genetic and some factor could have triggered it (In his case, it could be moving from India to USA, the environment change could have been the trigger) but we can never confirm it. Sometimes I think he could have remained healthy had we remained in India

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07-18-2015, 10:52 PM   #82
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My daughter was diagnosed with Crohns at age 12. 15 years ago, My nephew was also diagnosed with Crohns at the same age. They both have Crohns Colitis/Ulcerative Colitis.

What caused her IBD:Genetics and bacteria, not digesting food well and possibly thyroid issues.
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Last edited by Hope345; 07-23-2015 at 12:04 AM. Reason: simplified
07-19-2015, 03:41 AM   #83
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OK, so some think it was genetic, some think it's was a weakened immune system. For others it had to do with vaccines and/or antibiotics and some say stress/trauma played a role.

Maybe the cause is a bit of everything. When I look back at when it started in my case, all these things were the case.
Constipation and stomach aches seemed to run a bit in the family on father's and mother's side.
I had been ill with a bad persistent cough a year long and had antibiotics and lots of codeine (which causes constipation in many people). So my immune system wasn't too good. I went to Indonesia on holiday and needed a lot of vaccines and when I came back we found out that my dad had an affair and things went to pieces.
It all started from then on.
I don't think there is one cause, I think it's a combination of factors. That's why I believe in a more holistic approach to find the solution.
07-19-2015, 09:32 PM   #84
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I agree with you. I don't think there is any single original cause for the disease.

Something, and that can mean a pathogen, antibiotic, chemical exposure, maybe even genetics play a role, alters the immune system/response.

Then exposure to one or more pathogens result in the symptoms of the disease.

I am leaning toward a pathogen in my particular case being the original cause, but I have been exposed to so much in my lifetime I certainly cannot be sure of that.

So I treat the causes of the symptoms the best way I can hope I am right enough to stay in remission.

Time will be the judge.

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07-22-2015, 05:58 PM   #85
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I think my cause I lost 8 teeth during few years while I am still young and I couldn't replace then I was eating pizza two much 😔
07-23-2015, 03:58 AM   #86
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Just been reading an interesting article on Greenmedinfo that might go well with the topic of this thread.

Here is just a part of it.

No one would accuse Yehuda Shoenfeld of being a quack. The Israeli clinician has spent more than three decades studying the human immune system and is at the pinnacle of his profession. You might say he is more foundation than fringe in his specialty; he wrote the textbooks. The Mosaic of Autoimmunity, Autoantibodies, Diagnostic Criteria in Autoimmune Diseases, Infection and Autoimmunity, Cancer and Autoimmunity – the list is 25 titles long and some of them are cornerstones of clinical practice. Hardly surprising that Shoenfeld has been called the "Godfather of Autoimmunology" – the study of the immune system turned on itself in a wide array of diseases from type 1 diabetes to ulcerative colitis and multiple sclerosis.

But something strange is happening in the world of immunology lately and a small evidence of it is that the Godfather of Autoimmunology is pointing to vaccines – specifically, some of their ingredients including the toxic metal aluminum – as a significant contributor to the growing global epidemic of autoimmune diseases. The bigger evidence is a huge body of research that's poured in in the past 15 years, and particularly in the past five years. Take for example, a recent article published in the journal Pharmacological Research in which Shoenfeld and colleagues issue unprecedented guidelines naming four categories of people who are most at risk for vaccine-induced autoimmunity.

"On one hand," vaccines prevent infections which can trigger autoimmunity, say the paper's authors, Alessandra Soriano, of the Department of Clinical Medicine and Rheumatology at the Campus Bio-Medico University in Rome, Gideon Nesher, of the Hebrew University Medical School in Jerusalem and Shoenfeld, founder and head of the Zabludowicz Center of Autoimmune Diseases in the Sheba Medical Center at Tel Hashomer. He is also editor of three medical journals and author of more than 1,500 research papers across the spectrum of medical journalism and founder of the International Congress on Autoimmunology. "On the other hand, many reports that describe post-vaccination autoimmunity strongly suggest that vaccines can indeed trigger autoimmunity. Defined autoimmune diseases that may occur following vaccinations include arthritis, lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus, SLE) diabetes mellitus, thrombocytopenia, vasculitis, dermatomyosiositis, Guillain-Barre syndrome and demyelinating disorders. Almost all types of vaccines have been reported to be associated with the onset of ASIA."

ASIA – or Autoimmune/inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants (also known as Shoenfeld's syndrome) -- first appeared in the Journal of Autoimmunology four years ago. It is an umbrella term for a collection of similar symptoms, including Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, that result after exposure to an adjuvant – an environmental agent including common vaccine ingredients that stimulate the immune system. Since then an enormous body of research, using ASIA as a paradigm, has begun to unravel the mystery of how environmental toxins, particularly the metal aluminum used in vaccines, can trigger an immune system chain reaction in susceptible individuals and may lead to overt autoimmune disease.

Autoimmune disease results when the body's system meant to attack foreign invaders turns instead to attack part of the body it belongs to (auto is Greek for self). If the immune system is like a national defence system, antibodies are like drones programmed to recognize a certain type of invader (a bacteria say) and to destroy them or mark them for destruction by other special forces. Autoantibodies are like drones that are misidentifying a component of the human body and have launched a sustained attack on it. If they mistakenly target a component of the conductive sheath around neurons, for example, nerve impulses stop conducting properly, muscles go into spasm and coordination fails; multiple sclerosis results. If autoantibodies erroneously focus on joint tissue; rheumatoid arthritis results. If they target the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas, Type 1 diabetes, and so on.

Look it up if you want to read the full article.
07-23-2015, 03:56 PM   #87
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Very interesting. I can tell you that all my health issues started after getting a flu vaccine back in 2003. So yes, I agree that any type of vaccine can trigger an immune response that can be catastrophic for some. I just read about a girl who got the Gardasil vaccine and she developed ALS. It is definitely very scary.













Just been reading an interesting article on Greenmedinfo that might go well with the topic of this thread.

Here is just a part of it.

No one would accuse Yehuda Shoenfeld of being a quack. The Israeli clinician has spent more than three decades studying the human immune system and is at the pinnacle of his profession. You might say he is more foundation than fringe in his specialty; he wrote the textbooks. The Mosaic of Autoimmunity, Autoantibodies, Diagnostic Criteria in Autoimmune Diseases, Infection and Autoimmunity, Cancer and Autoimmunity – the list is 25 titles long and some of them are cornerstones of clinical practice. Hardly surprising that Shoenfeld has been called the "Godfather of Autoimmunology" – the study of the immune system turned on itself in a wide array of diseases from type 1 diabetes to ulcerative colitis and multiple sclerosis.

But something strange is happening in the world of immunology lately and a small evidence of it is that the Godfather of Autoimmunology is pointing to vaccines – specifically, some of their ingredients including the toxic metal aluminum – as a significant contributor to the growing global epidemic of autoimmune diseases. The bigger evidence is a huge body of research that's poured in in the past 15 years, and particularly in the past five years. Take for example, a recent article published in the journal Pharmacological Research in which Shoenfeld and colleagues issue unprecedented guidelines naming four categories of people who are most at risk for vaccine-induced autoimmunity.

"On one hand," vaccines prevent infections which can trigger autoimmunity, say the paper's authors, Alessandra Soriano, of the Department of Clinical Medicine and Rheumatology at the Campus Bio-Medico University in Rome, Gideon Nesher, of the Hebrew University Medical School in Jerusalem and Shoenfeld, founder and head of the Zabludowicz Center of Autoimmune Diseases in the Sheba Medical Center at Tel Hashomer. He is also editor of three medical journals and author of more than 1,500 research papers across the spectrum of medical journalism and founder of the International Congress on Autoimmunology. "On the other hand, many reports that describe post-vaccination autoimmunity strongly suggest that vaccines can indeed trigger autoimmunity. Defined autoimmune diseases that may occur following vaccinations include arthritis, lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus, SLE) diabetes mellitus, thrombocytopenia, vasculitis, dermatomyosiositis, Guillain-Barre syndrome and demyelinating disorders. Almost all types of vaccines have been reported to be associated with the onset of ASIA."

ASIA – or Autoimmune/inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants (also known as Shoenfeld's syndrome) -- first appeared in the Journal of Autoimmunology four years ago. It is an umbrella term for a collection of similar symptoms, including Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, that result after exposure to an adjuvant – an environmental agent including common vaccine ingredients that stimulate the immune system. Since then an enormous body of research, using ASIA as a paradigm, has begun to unravel the mystery of how environmental toxins, particularly the metal aluminum used in vaccines, can trigger an immune system chain reaction in susceptible individuals and may lead to overt autoimmune disease.

Autoimmune disease results when the body's system meant to attack foreign invaders turns instead to attack part of the body it belongs to (auto is Greek for self). If the immune system is like a national defence system, antibodies are like drones programmed to recognize a certain type of invader (a bacteria say) and to destroy them or mark them for destruction by other special forces. Autoantibodies are like drones that are misidentifying a component of the human body and have launched a sustained attack on it. If they mistakenly target a component of the conductive sheath around neurons, for example, nerve impulses stop conducting properly, muscles go into spasm and coordination fails; multiple sclerosis results. If autoantibodies erroneously focus on joint tissue; rheumatoid arthritis results. If they target the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas, Type 1 diabetes, and so on.

Look it up if you want to read the full article.
07-24-2015, 03:35 AM   #88
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Yep, it's scary business.........and that is the key word "business".
07-31-2015, 12:21 PM   #89
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I'd never had anything wrong with me until the Crohn's symptoms started. No exposure to antibiotics, and I was so rarely ill that I had a phobia of throwing up (one plus to the Crohn's I guess, getting rid of that). I've read a little about MAP and contaminated dairy products, but I've had a real thing against milk since I was around 5 and refused to go near it.

My symptoms started late last year and honestly, I have no clue. My mother was diagnosed with Crohn's roughly three years ago.
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