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01-24-2014, 03:25 PM   #1
strawberrys78
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Thinking of going Paleo!

What do you guys think? Should I go Paleo? Before, I would only get sick if I ate something I know would hurt me.. ex: greasy pizza, mcdonald's, chinese, red meat, gravy, poutine, etc. I began eating healthier but ended up in the hospital with a partial obstruction (that seemed to came out of nowhere, pain/vomiting commenced 9PM 2 Saturdays ago). I see my GI on Jan 28, can't wait!

Right now I use the app GI Moniter and I keep track of every single thing I'm hurting and how I feel afterwards. I'm thinking of going 100% paleo.. I've found tons of great recipes on pinterest, and I might just go paleo and then record how I feel, and if there are paleo foods (ie: dairy or something) that irritate me then I will just cut it out.

What's everyone's thoughts?
__________________
Diagnosed with Crohn's Disease May 2013 after a 2 yr battle. Colonoscopy Dec 2012/MRI Apr 2013. Partial Obstruction discovered Jan 2014, 6 day hospital stay. 30 CM of small/a couple of inches of large intestine removed in laparascopic surgery Sept 10/14 due to not responding to medication.

Currently taking:
Remicade

Previously taken:
Asacol
Pentasa (hair loss)
Cipro (allergy)
Morphine
Flagyl
Imuran (Reaction)
Prednisone
Ranitidine
Atasol 30
Tramacet
Toradol
01-24-2014, 03:56 PM   #2
carrollco
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I do a modified paleo as I cannot do dairy at all. I use almond flour for baking, if that upsets me, which it can sometimes, I take a break. Other than that I eat fresh food only, no processed, and organic when I can. I drink a lot of smoothies as they are easy to digest. Good luck!

__________________
Louann
First diagnosed 12/4/10
Humira 4/7/11 and lovin' it


Previous Meds:

Methotrexate--had kidney/liver damage
Lialda--allergic to aspirin--but didn't know until my Crohn's got much worse.
Prednisone--only when I have to!
01-24-2014, 04:00 PM   #3
strawberrys78
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I do a modified paleo as I cannot do dairy at all. I use almond flour for baking, if that upsets me, which it can sometimes, I take a break. Other than that I eat fresh food only, no processed, and organic when I can. I drink a lot of smoothies as they are easy to digest. Good luck!
Awesome. I also love smoothies. I used to drink a lot of whey protein smoothies but I am thinking I might have an intolerance to dairy because the other night I had a frozen yogurt with a couple crushed oreos on top and I ended up getting really bad pain in my tummy (it was either from that or I had like one bite of skin off chicken breast) so I'm going to have to cut those whey smoothies out and just drink regular smoothies. I also use almond flour to make "healthy chicken fingers" I just buy the almonds blanched and ground them up in my blender to use as flour, much cheaper.. I read online that people with Crohn's should avoid nuts, but does that still count if they're ground up? And I also read we should avoid fruits with skins and seeds like strawberries and blueberries.. should I give these up? I hate to!!

And one more question for you.. does paleo mean cutting out bread? Like I usually eat whole wheat bread (another thing I read is bad for people with Crohns - sometimes I find it is hard to eat healthy because half of the things that are considered "healthy" I'm apparently supposed to avoid!!)
01-24-2014, 05:45 PM   #4
Charleigh
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My DS has done great on paleo minus the dairy (with dairy is actually not paleo but primal). He also doesn't tolerate rice even though some on paleo think white rice is ok. We saw a great improvement in symptoms but after moving to the auto immune paleo protocol we saw eve more improvement and labs improved too. I would start with just the paleo. If you adjust ok and want to try for even more improvement then move to the auto immune paleo. Jumping straight into the AI Paleo is tough.
For E he had to go easy on raw foods, etc at first but as he healed he could have more and more fruits and veggies and even eat them raw. Maybe go easy on the raw stuff to start. Stick with meat, cooked veggies, sweet potatoes, and easy to digest fruits. Then branch out . If nuts bother you, don't use them yet......they are not allowed with AI Paleo anyway. Good luck
__________________
Mom to 4 incredible kids ~ 17, 15, 13, & 7
Including Incredible "E" ~ 15 year old Crohn's kid
Diagnosed at 11.
Enteral Nutrition
01-24-2014, 06:13 PM   #5
strawberrys78
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My DS has done great on paleo minus the dairy (with dairy is actually not paleo but primal). He also doesn't tolerate rice even though some on paleo think white rice is ok. We saw a great improvement in symptoms but after moving to the auto immune paleo protocol we saw eve more improvement and labs improved too. I would start with just the paleo. If you adjust ok and want to try for even more improvement then move to the auto immune paleo. Jumping straight into the AI Paleo is tough.
For E he had to go easy on raw foods, etc at first but as he healed he could have more and more fruits and veggies and even eat them raw. Maybe go easy on the raw stuff to start. Stick with meat, cooked veggies, sweet potatoes, and easy to digest fruits. Then branch out . If nuts bother you, don't use them yet......they are not allowed with AI Paleo anyway. Good luck
Thank you! I've never heard of the Auto Immune Paleo before. I've never noticed that nuts or even fruits triggered me off before, but I don't know if I maybe wasn't taking good enough notice, there are certain things I KNOW I can't eat, like gravy; however, I do not want to irritate my stomach and cause another blockage without knowing I'm doing it (i.e building it up over time by eating things that irritate just a little [even if they are fruit or nuts] each time I eat them).

On the Paleo diet, would I be allowed to drink almond milk? I buy the vanilla, chocolate and regular kinds.. the brand is almond breeze, and it's in the organic section but things from there can be tricky sometimes! Also, do you have any tips or tricks of anything you do with veggies or meat to make them taste good? I can't tolerate red meat although I love it (thinking I might try a small amount of extra lean meat sometime because I usually have it in spaghetti or something of the kind, and it may actually not be the meat but the sauce that is triggering me), and I hate all vegetables except carrots and sometimes asparagus lol.

Oh, and am I supposed to cut out wheat/bread/pasta, etc. Should I buy gluten free versions or is this cut out altogether?

Sorry for so many questions! I'm only 20, and I'm not the most experienced person with crohn's and I'm not overly experienced in cooking either lol, college student probs.
01-24-2014, 07:45 PM   #6
Charleigh
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Thank you! I've never heard of the Auto Immune Paleo before. I've never noticed that nuts or even fruits triggered me off before, but I don't know if I maybe wasn't taking good enough notice, there are certain things I KNOW I can't eat, like gravy; however, I do not want to irritate my stomach and cause another blockage without knowing I'm doing it (i.e building it up over time by eating things that irritate just a little [even if they are fruit or nuts] each time I eat them).

On the Paleo diet, would I be allowed to drink almond milk? I buy the vanilla, chocolate and regular kinds.. the brand is almond breeze, and it's in the organic section but things from there can be tricky sometimes! Also, do you have any tips or tricks of anything you do with veggies or meat to make them taste good? I can't tolerate red meat although I love it (thinking I might try a small amount of extra lean meat sometime because I usually have it in spaghetti or something of the kind, and it may actually not be the meat but the sauce that is triggering me), and I hate all vegetables except carrots and sometimes asparagus lol.

Oh, and am I supposed to cut out wheat/bread/pasta, etc. Should I buy gluten free versions or is this cut out altogether?

Sorry for so many questions! I'm only 20, and I'm not the most experienced person with crohn's and I'm not overly experienced in cooking either lol, college student probs.
Unfortunately, to be true to paleo you will need to cut out all grains (which means no pasta, bread, etc....even gluten free). No rice, wheat, corn, oats, etc. . I know, it sounds tougher than it actually is....once you get used to it anyway!

E could not handle red meat at first, but as he healed he could tolerate ground beef or stew beef that has been cooked for a long time.

Technically almond milk would be a no,no because of the sugar but I know that some people will still use the regular almond milk (and skip the extra sweet chocolate and vanilla ones). You could try that at first?

Do you have a trader joes? They have a great canned coconut milk that is just water and coconut milk, and it is great for smoothies and ice cream. E has a smoothie almost every morning. We blend bananas, sunbutter, coconut milk, and ice and it is very yummy and packs good calories. The other treat that E likes from there are the plantain chips - just plantains and sunflower seed oil. They have wonderful roasted salted sunflower seeds too

Sweet potatoes are a staple and the great thing is that they are easy peasy. Just scrub them up, wrap in foil, and bake. After baking you can add some coconut oil or dairy free butter (E does fine on original Earth Balance) and some honey if you like sweetness. Sweet potatoes are so easy to digest, they are super yummy when baked, and they pack good carbs/vitamins, etc. They really should be a Crohn's "go to" food!

Meat - don't fear fat. If you like the flavor of dark meat chicken better then get that. Use plenty of olive or coconut oil and all the spices you want. Just watch for spice mixes and seasoning blends because they sometimes have wheat, etc added.

I highly suggest that you cook up lots of meat when you have a meal and store the rest for quick meals and lunches.

More veggies would be ideal and maybe you could try some new things? But, E is not a huge veggie fan either so he doesn't eat a crazy amount of them like some paleo dieters do. He eats a good bit of meat and fruit and then I make him eat veggies too . If he makes his own lunch it is meat and plantain chips or meat and fruit though!
Questions are not a problem
01-24-2014, 07:54 PM   #7
strawberrys78
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Unfortunately, to be true to paleo you will need to cut out all grains (which means no pasta, bread, etc....even gluten free). No rice, wheat, corn, oats, etc. . I know, it sounds tougher than it actually is....once you get used to it anyway!

E could not handle red meat at first, but as he healed he could tolerate ground beef or stew beef that has been cooked for a long time.

Technically almond milk would be a no,no because of the sugar but I know that some people will still use the regular almond milk (and skip the extra sweet chocolate and vanilla ones). You could try that at first?

Do you have a trader joes? They have a great canned coconut milk that is just water and coconut milk, and it is great for smoothies and ice cream. E has a smoothie almost every morning. We blend bananas, sunbutter, coconut milk, and ice and it is very yummy and packs good calories. The other treat that E likes from there are the plantain chips - just plantains and sunflower seed oil. They have wonderful roasted salted sunflower seeds too

Sweet potatoes are a staple and the great thing is that they are easy peasy. Just scrub them up, wrap in foil, and bake. After baking you can add some coconut oil or dairy free butter (E does fine on original Earth Balance) and some honey if you like sweetness. Sweet potatoes are so easy to digest, they are super yummy when baked, and they pack good carbs/vitamins, etc. They really should be a Crohn's "go to" food!

Meat - don't fear fat. If you like the flavor of dark meat chicken better then get that. Use plenty of olive or coconut oil and all the spices you want. Just watch for spice mixes and seasoning blends because they sometimes have wheat, etc added.

I highly suggest that you cook up lots of meat when you have a meal and store the rest for quick meals and lunches.

More veggies would be ideal and maybe you could try some new things? But, E is not a huge veggie fan either so he doesn't eat a crazy amount of them like some paleo dieters do. He eats a good bit of meat and fruit and then I make him eat veggies too . If he makes his own lunch it is meat and plantain chips or meat and fruit though!
Questions are not a problem
Thanks so much! Nope, no Trader Joe's where I'm from (Canada), I live in a small area and I find that it is hard to find good true organic food. I just made a smoothie out of pomegranate and banana and I'm feeling kind of crappy.. maybe it was too soon for pomegranate. Boo lol. I think it will be hard for me to give up wheat but I found some great paleo pancake and muffin recipes online that use almond flour and bananas that I wanna try! I'm going to try and go as paleo as I can, and hopefully at some point I will be able to eat 100% paleo. It's such a life change, going from eating out all the time, and eating greasy processed food to trying to discover healthy alternatives (which even sometimes can be hard considering half of the healthy things that are out there I can't eat!!) Maybe when I start feeling better someday I will be able to tolerate spinach again... I dream for the day when I can eat a spinach salad. Lol
01-24-2014, 07:55 PM   #8
strawberrys78
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Unfortunately, to be true to paleo you will need to cut out all grains (which means no pasta, bread, etc....even gluten free). No rice, wheat, corn, oats, etc. . I know, it sounds tougher than it actually is....once you get used to it anyway!

E could not handle red meat at first, but as he healed he could tolerate ground beef or stew beef that has been cooked for a long time.

Technically almond milk would be a no,no because of the sugar but I know that some people will still use the regular almond milk (and skip the extra sweet chocolate and vanilla ones). You could try that at first?

Do you have a trader joes? They have a great canned coconut milk that is just water and coconut milk, and it is great for smoothies and ice cream. E has a smoothie almost every morning. We blend bananas, sunbutter, coconut milk, and ice and it is very yummy and packs good calories. The other treat that E likes from there are the plantain chips - just plantains and sunflower seed oil. They have wonderful roasted salted sunflower seeds too

Sweet potatoes are a staple and the great thing is that they are easy peasy. Just scrub them up, wrap in foil, and bake. After baking you can add some coconut oil or dairy free butter (E does fine on original Earth Balance) and some honey if you like sweetness. Sweet potatoes are so easy to digest, they are super yummy when baked, and they pack good carbs/vitamins, etc. They really should be a Crohn's "go to" food!

Meat - don't fear fat. If you like the flavor of dark meat chicken better then get that. Use plenty of olive or coconut oil and all the spices you want. Just watch for spice mixes and seasoning blends because they sometimes have wheat, etc added.

I highly suggest that you cook up lots of meat when you have a meal and store the rest for quick meals and lunches.

More veggies would be ideal and maybe you could try some new things? But, E is not a huge veggie fan either so he doesn't eat a crazy amount of them like some paleo dieters do. He eats a good bit of meat and fruit and then I make him eat veggies too . If he makes his own lunch it is meat and plantain chips or meat and fruit though!
Questions are not a problem
Oh and is quinoa allowed? I've been meaning to try it!! I've seen some good looking recipes that use it.
01-24-2014, 09:37 PM   #9
fruitlover61
 
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For smoothies we use NOW egg white powder - order from Amazon for great price. My dtr is at college with IBD- is very strict with her diet and is feeling ok.
She avoids dairy, carrageenan(found in Almond and soy milk, coconut milk), artificial ingredients, corn, soy. She does use rice flour and spelt flour for homemade baked items. Local honey in small amt for sweetening.
Hope this helps
01-25-2014, 07:16 PM   #10
hugh
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Paleo is a brandname for a particular version of an ancestral diet.
It's pretty good but many people have problems by going too low-carb.
(Our ancestors would have relied heavily on roots and tubers and would have valued carbs but would never have access to the (high) quantity and (low) quality available now.)

Oh, and am I supposed to cut out wheat/bread/pasta, etc. Should I buy gluten free versions or is this cut out altogether?
Cut out altogeather


There are so many paleo sites that it can get a bit confusing as to what is and what isn't 'legal'.
The number of paleo cakes and treats is truly staggering as all the sweeteners are 99% the same (sucrose, frucose and glucose).
You should avoid those for the first few months, along with any commercial milk substitutes.

I think it is best to look at it as a framework for determining what food is right for me (you).
Firstly eliminate anything that isn't food, this means ALL 'food-like products' so everything manufactured is out (with a slim possibility of reintroducing small amounts of some of these foods later if they are tolerated)

Eliminate all processed foods, sweeteners, grains and seed oils is an absolute must too begin with.
I would recommend looking at the the GAPS introduction diet[1] (and full GAPS if it suits you), the "perfect health diet"[2] and reading up on the 'autoimmune protocol'[3]

What works for you will (probably) be somewhere in that triangle.

[1] Gut and Psychology Syndrome Introduction Diet
http://gapsdiet.com/INTRODUCTION_DIET.html
This is a great diet to bring symptoms under control (i've read more positive anecdotes than negative for what that's worth).
Many may find the GAPS diet too low carb and too restrictive long term, but as an intro to bring gut bacteria under control and restore digestive function it is well worth a try.
There are many who find low-carb diets to be fine but some people have health problems that may take a while to manifest.
I would say it is ok to go gaps to get things under control and then introduce tubers and maybe white rice after that.
GAPS is very similar to low carb paleo with more emphasise in probiotics and restoring healthy gut function

[2] Bowel Disorders, Part I: About Gut Disease (part 1 of 4)
http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2010/07...g-gut-disease/
These diseases probably develop through a hierarchy of causes:

-Food toxins damage the intestine and make it leaky to gut bacteria and bacterial proteins.
-Malnutrition impairs the immune response to toxins and slows the healing of intestinal injuries. This makes the intestine even more leaky and damaged.
-Damaged immunity allows bacteria to penetrate the gut mucosa and infect intestinal cells, and to enter the body and create systemic infections including intracellular infections of immune cells. The immune response to these infections creates an inflammatory environment which makes the gut even leakier. The infections also weaken the ability of the immune system to heal the gut.
-Entry of toxins and bacteria into the body leads to autoimmunity. Food toxins conjugate with human proteins and provoke antibodies against the human protein; bacterial proteins that are ‘molecular mimics’ of human proteins engender antibodies that strike both the bacterial and human proteins.
-Autoimmunity leads to further damage to the gut and to other tissues, like the thyroid, which are important for immune function and wound healing. Hypothyroidism, for instance, promotes disease progression.
-In its early stages, development of the disease may be accelerated by a long course of antibiotics or an infection that causes severe diarrhea. These kill healthful gut bacteria and facilitate their replacement by pathogens.


[3] The Autoimmune Protocol
http://www.thepaleomom.com/autoimmun...mmune-protocol
I think this is still very relevant even though crohn's (probably?) isn't an autoimmune disease. It is still a damaged immune system that does not preform it's functions well enough to maintain health.
Genetic predisposition to autoimmunity makes up about one third of your risk of developing an autoimmune disease. The other two thirds of your risk come from environmental factors, which include: diet, lifestyle, infections (both prior and persistent) exposure to toxins, hormones, weight, etc. While you cannot control your genetics or whether or not you had mono as a kid, you do have an immense amount of control over your diet and lifestyle (and the extent that these affect hormones and weight and even toxin exposure). By removing the foods that contribute to a leaky gut, gut dysbiosis (the wrong numbers, relative quantities, or types of microorganisms typically growing in the wrong locations in your gut), hormone imbalance, and that stimulate inflammation and the immune system, you can create the opportunity for your body to heal. By addressing important lifestyle factors and changing your focus to eating nutrient-dense foods that support optimal gut health (and optimal health of your gut microorganisms), that restore levels of important nutrients and provide all of the building blocks that your body needs to heal and properly regulate the immune system, that help resolve inflammation and support organ function, you create an environment in your body conducive to healing.
__________________
'Liberation can only be gained by practice, never by discussion'
SN Goenka

Last edited by hugh; 01-25-2014 at 07:32 PM.
01-25-2014, 07:38 PM   #11
strawberrys78
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Join Date: May 2013
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Paleo is a brandname for a particular version of an ancestral diet.
It's pretty good but many people have problems by going too low-carb.
(Our ancestors would have relied heavily on roots and tubers and would have valued carbs but would never have access to the (high) quantity and (low) quality available now.)

There are so many paleo sites that it can get a bit confusing as to what is and what isn't 'legal'.
The number of paleo cakes and treats is truly staggering as all the sweeteners are 99% the same (sucrose, frucose and glucose).
You should avoid those for the first few months, along with any commercial milk substitutes.

I think it is best to look at it as a framework for determining what food is right for me (you).
Firstly eliminate anything that isn't food, this means ALL 'food-like products' so everything manufactured is out (with a slim possibility of reintroducing small amounts of some of these foods later if they are tolerated)

Eliminate all processed foods, sweeteners, grains and seed oils is an absolute must too begin with.
I would recommend looking at the the GAPS introduction diet[1] (and full GAPS if it suits you), the "perfect health diet"[2] and reading up on the 'autoimmune protocol'[3]

What works for you will (probably) be somewhere in that triangle.

[1] Gut and Psychology Syndrome Introduction Diet
http://gapsdiet.com/INTRODUCTION_DIET.html
This is a great diet to bring symptoms under control (i've read more positive anecdotes than negative for what that's worth).
Many may find the GAPS diet too low carb and too restrictive long term, but as an intro to bring gut bacteria under control and restore digestive function it is well worth a try.
There are many who find low-carb diets to be fine but some people have health problems that may take a while to manifest.
I would say it is ok to go gaps to get things under control and then introduce tubers and maybe white rice after that.
GAPS is very similar to low carb paleo with more emphasise in probiotics and restoring healthy gut function

[2] Bowel Disorders, Part I: About Gut Disease (part 1 of 4)
http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2010/07...g-gut-disease/
These diseases probably develop through a hierarchy of causes:

-Food toxins damage the intestine and make it leaky to gut bacteria and bacterial proteins.
-Malnutrition impairs the immune response to toxins and slows the healing of intestinal injuries. This makes the intestine even more leaky and damaged.
-Damaged immunity allows bacteria to penetrate the gut mucosa and infect intestinal cells, and to enter the body and create systemic infections including intracellular infections of immune cells. The immune response to these infections creates an inflammatory environment which makes the gut even leakier. The infections also weaken the ability of the immune system to heal the gut.
-Entry of toxins and bacteria into the body leads to autoimmunity. Food toxins conjugate with human proteins and provoke antibodies against the human protein; bacterial proteins that are ‘molecular mimics’ of human proteins engender antibodies that strike both the bacterial and human proteins.
-Autoimmunity leads to further damage to the gut and to other tissues, like the thyroid, which are important for immune function and wound healing. Hypothyroidism, for instance, promotes disease progression.
-In its early stages, development of the disease may be accelerated by a long course of antibiotics or an infection that causes severe diarrhea. These kill healthful gut bacteria and facilitate their replacement by pathogens.


[3] The Autoimmune Protocol
http://www.thepaleomom.com/autoimmun...mmune-protocol
I think this is still very relevant even though crohn's (probably?) isn't an autoimmune disease. It is still a damaged immune system that does not preform it's functions well enough to maintain health.
Genetic predisposition to autoimmunity makes up about one third of your risk of developing an autoimmune disease. The other two thirds of your risk come from environmental factors, which include: diet, lifestyle, infections (both prior and persistent) exposure to toxins, hormones, weight, etc. While you cannot control your genetics or whether or not you had mono as a kid, you do have an immense amount of control over your diet and lifestyle (and the extent that these affect hormones and weight and even toxin exposure). By removing the foods that contribute to a leaky gut, gut dysbiosis (the wrong numbers, relative quantities, or types of microorganisms typically growing in the wrong locations in your gut), hormone imbalance, and that stimulate inflammation and the immune system, you can create the opportunity for your body to heal. By addressing important lifestyle factors and changing your focus to eating nutrient-dense foods that support optimal gut health (and optimal health of your gut microorganisms), that restore levels of important nutrients and provide all of the building blocks that your body needs to heal and properly regulate the immune system, that help resolve inflammation and support organ function, you create an environment in your body conducive to healing.
Thanks so much for all of the info! The whole diet thing is super overwhelming. I have decided that I am going to eat as clean as I can, all fruits and veggies and meat (might try introducing red meat later as I suspect it hurts me), I am going to try my best to eliminate dairy and wheat but I'm not going to say I'm giving it up 100% because that isn't realistic for me, someday I may want a sandwich with whole wheat bread, so everything in moderation I guess. Even once a week would be good for me, I'm a big wheat and dairy eater! I am also keeping a journal of everything I eat and pain and bm's do I'm hoping that will help me too!! Hopefully I'm on the right track lol.. Just gonna eat as healthy as I can!
01-25-2014, 07:41 PM   #12
hugh
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Best of luck, but don't expect too much without giving up wheat
01-25-2014, 07:50 PM   #13
strawberrys78
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Best of luck, but don't expect too much without giving up wheat
It will have to be an indulgence lol! Is wheat really that bad? I have certain things (for example, gravy) that I know 100% I can't eat it or I'm asking to get sick. But, if I ate a couple of slices of whole wheat toast it never affected me. Breads or pasta or anything like that was never something that would give Me a reaction. Is that one of those things that would be hurting me without me knowing it?
01-25-2014, 08:33 PM   #14
Poppysocks
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What do you guys think? Should I go Paleo? Before, I would only get sick if I ate something I know would hurt me.. ex: greasy pizza, mcdonald's, chinese, red meat, gravy, poutine, etc. I began eating healthier but ended up in the hospital with a partial obstruction (that seemed to came out of nowhere, pain/vomiting commenced 9PM 2 Saturdays ago). I see my GI on Jan 28, can't wait!

Right now I use the app GI Moniter and I keep track of every single thing I'm hurting and how I feel afterwards. I'm thinking of going 100% paleo.. I've found tons of great recipes on pinterest, and I might just go paleo and then record how I feel, and if there are paleo foods (ie: dairy or something) that irritate me then I will just cut it out.

What's everyone's thoughts?
Give it a shot!! I've decided this is going to be the way I eat from now on. No grains at all. I will only use butter when I'm cooking, and salt.
01-25-2014, 08:52 PM   #15
hugh
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It will have to be an indulgence lol! Is wheat really that bad? I have certain things (for example, gravy) that I know 100% I can't eat it or I'm asking to get sick. But, if I ate a couple of slices of whole wheat toast it never affected me. Breads or pasta or anything like that was never something that would give Me a reaction. Is that one of those things that would be hurting me without me knowing it?
Look through those articles, particularly the Perfect Health Diet set.
It is important that you gain an understanding of what is going on as you are unlikely to find a doctor that does. (edit) understand or utilise any type of dietary regime(edit)

Bowel Disease, Part II: Healing the Gut By Eliminating Food Toxins
http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2010/07...g-food-toxins/
"
"Cereal Grain Toxicity

Grasses became the staple foods of agriculture because of their rich yields: a single plant may generate tens of thousands of seeds annually.

Yet this prolific seed production has always made grasses attractive to herbivores, and caused seeds to evolve high levels of toxins designed to poison mammalian digestive tracts, thus enabling their seeds to pass through herbivore guts undigested. It is these toxins that make the cereal grains so dangerous to human health.

The effectiveness of grain toxins at sabotaging human digestion is illustrated by the increase in fecal mass they produce:

For every gram of wheat bran eaten, fecal weight increases by 5.7 grams. [5]

By inhibiting human digestion, wheat toxins dramatically increase the amount of undigested starch reaching the colon. This increased food supply substantially increases the bacterial population – and the presence of starch, which is ordinarily unavailable in the colon, favors the growth of pathogenic species.

Unfortunately wheat toxins do much more than inhibit digestion of food. They also damage the gut itself.

Wheat contains an ingenious cocktail of toxins:

Gluten, a complex of proteins, inspires on immune response which inflames the intestine in at least 83% of people [6], and makes the intestine permeable, allowing gut bacteria and their toxins to enter the body. [7] Gluten triggers anti-wheat antibodies in at least 30% of the population, and auto-antibodies – that is, antibodies that attack human cells – in at least 0.4% of the population. [8] These unlucky folks suffer celiac disease, which devastates the intestine, as well as autoimmune thyroiditis. [9]
Opioid peptides produce effects similar to morphine and heroin. Wheat opioids have been implicated as causes of schizophrenia. [10]
Wheat germ agglutinin is a lectin, or protein that binds sugars. At extremely low doses, a few parts per billion, WGA causes gut inflammation and leakiness. At typical dietary doses, WGA causes shedding of the intestinal brush border and shrinkage in the surface area of the intestine. [11] WGA alone can induce celiac disease in rats. [12]

By unknown mechanisms, grains can induce vitamin deficiency diseases. Wheat and oats induce rickets [13] while corn induces pellagra. [14]

Since as little as 1 milligram of gluten per day can prevent recovery from bowel disease [15], it is essential that grains be eliminated entirely from the diet."

Last edited by hugh; 01-26-2014 at 03:06 AM.
01-26-2014, 03:08 AM   #16
hugh
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if you are thinking paleo then watch this.....

Great series of talks on paleo and IBD by Dr. Joseph Brasco of the Huntsville Center for Colon and Digestive Disease and a few of his patients.
part 1


and parts up to 4......
01-26-2014, 06:29 AM   #17
strawberrys78
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if you are thinking paleo then watch this.....

Great series of talks on paleo and IBD by Dr. Joseph Brasco of the Huntsville Center for Colon and Digestive Disease and a few of his patients.
part 1


and parts up to 4......
Thanks! I'm really gonna try my hardest to stick to it, I just know it is going to be ridiculously hard for me and I'm going to "cheat" every now and then.. Wish I wasn't such a comfort eater lol food is addicting and seriously no one in my family eats even close to healthy.. Guess I will have to break the cycle!!
01-26-2014, 07:16 AM   #18
strawberrys78
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Oh and sorry for all of the questions guys, but paleo eaters still eat like whole chickens and stuff with bone in and skin on, but I find skin on chicken to be bad for me sometimes, same thing with red meat, so should I be tweaking the paleo diet to fit my crohns? Same thing with tomatoes, and raw veggies, I don't know if they hurt me specifically but I've read they're bad for crohns so should I eliminate them or keep them?
01-26-2014, 03:34 PM   #19
hugh
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Definitely tweak to suit yourself.

If something is not paleo don't eat it
-but if it is paleo it doesn't mean you have to eat it.

After a while retry the paleo foods that you have had problems with as the problems may resolve themselves after a while on the diet

"As long as the gut wall is damaged and stays damaged, you can be juggling your diet forever removing different foods and never get anywhere. From my clinical experience it is best to concentrate on healing the gut wall with the Introduction Diet. Once the gut wall is healed, the foods will be digested properly before being absorbed, which will remove most food intolerances and allergies."
http://gapsdiet.com/INTRODUCTION_DIET.html
01-26-2014, 06:44 PM   #20
carrollco
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I don't eat any sweets, sweetners, breads, dairy, or nuts. Almond flour makes great biscotti and banana bread, but it is expensive. I have learned to cook, an amazing concept for the Queen of processed foods. No meat is off limits for me as long as I stick to just salt and pepper. It's the spices that get me. I think each person has to find what works for them best.

01-26-2014, 06:55 PM   #21
strawberrys78
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I don't eat any sweets, sweetners, breads, dairy, or nuts. Almond flour makes great biscotti and banana bread, but it is expensive. I have learned to cook, an amazing concept for the Queen of processed foods. No meat is off limits for me as long as I stick to just salt and pepper. It's the spices that get me. I think each person has to find what works for them best.
Awesome!! I am going to try and eat as clean as I can!! I haven't had breads/wheat/dairy in two days now.. (this is a huge accomplishment for me lol). Where I am from, it is really hard to gain access to good/pure/organic/grass fed food, but I am trying my best to stick to the guidelines. I make my own almond flour, I buy slivered almonds by the bag and just ground them to flour in my blender. I use almond flour mixed with paprika/onion & garlic powder/salt & pepper/chipotle seasoning as a breading for healthier chicken fingers. Today I also bought some coconut flour, oil, and flakes to try and incorporate into my cooking.

I said I was going to try paleo, but after thinking about it, it is kind of restrictive for me. I enjoy eating natural peanut butter ever now and then, and also I still eat shaved turkey breast (I buy a natural brand but even those have naturally occurring nitrites in them), and I'm minimizing dairy and wheat but I know I'll never be able to 100% cut them out.. I am going to ask my GI what she thinks. Those are things that I didn't ever notice made me sick before, so I think if I have it every now and then (maybe a couple of times a month), then that will be a great accomplishment for me.

I'm going from basically eating like any other teenage (even though I'm almost 21, same thing lol) where I'm from, aka frozen pizzas/garlic fingers, deep fried foods, battered foods, and overwhelming amount of wheat, lots of dairy, pre packaged foods such as granola bars, etc etc... to eating like I am now (as clean and natural as I can while also minimizing wheat and dairy) so I think I am doing pretty good haha! I find it really hard, food is extremely comforting to me, but just getting this far I think will be a long hard road!
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