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Crohn's Disease Forum » Ulcerative Colitis Forum » Diet information from nutritionist


01-31-2014, 04:19 PM   #1
katielj
 
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Diet information from nutritionist

Like most people, I am trying to educate myself on this awful disease; yesterday I met with a nutritionist (a lot of the information I had already researched), but wanted to share it with you.

So during a flare you want to reduce the stress and amount of work your GI track has to do, so I was told it's best to stick to these points:

- Eat six small-ish meals a day (breakfast, mid-morning snack, lunch, mid-afternoon snack, dinner, snack 2 hours before bed).
- Milk should be 1%/2% lactose free
- Cheese/dairy should also be low fat
- Avoid fatty/greasy foods
- Avoid whole grains, and only eat white breads (white, sour dough, potato, buttermilk etc), white rice's, white pasta
- Avoid berries and anything seeded
- Peel your fruits (pears, apples etc)
- Cook/steam your vegetables, avoid raw vegetables
- Avoid high fiber foods - fiber content should be less than 2g
- Avoid caffeine and fizzy drinks as much as possible
- Drink plenty of water

...I believe that was it! Once you have your flare-up under control it is okay to reintroduce certain foods - but only introduce one new food every couple of days (so you can keep track of what may cause a reaction/flare-up).

Hope this helps!


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01-31-2014, 06:02 PM   #2
FrancisK7
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That is pretty much the extent of how food can affect UC or Crohn's. People sometimes think adopting a new diet will suddenly mutate their genes and make the illness disappear. That's not how it works. As your nutritionist correctly explained, the point is to reduce stress in your GI tract.

Different food groups or nutrients require different levels of effort from the bowel when it comes to breaking them down. In my case, raw vegetables or fruits are obvious triggers. I really love eating big fresh salads for lunch, but it's just impossible when I'm flaring. Either I abstain or I eat it anyway knowing full well I will pay the price later. Steamed veggies are fine though, which is fantastic

Caffeine has no effect on me, neither does alcohol, but my friend who has Crohn's has no issues with uncooked veggies but cannot touch coffee at all when he's flaring.

It's best to work on a case by case basis, keep note of what you eat in some kind of excel sheet, and you will find what affects you and what doesn't.
01-31-2014, 08:11 PM   #3
katielj
 
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Thanks again FrancisK7! It sounds like you've also done your research.

Exactly, the nutritionist said it's definitely case by case; and I will definitely keep a sheet of what effects me.

Thanks again!

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04-07-2014, 10:20 PM   #4
FrozenGirl
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I have been considering seeing a dietician lately as I feel so restricted with food. The low fat cheese is new to me, cheese hasn't really been an issue but maybe I just happen to like low fat cheeses.... great post.
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08-03-2014, 05:50 PM   #5
Ann Morgan
Senior Member
Have you ever heard of the BRAT diet ? That is Bananas, Rice, Applesauce and Toast. This seems to work for me if my colon is feeling really, really bad. As far as foods that I cannot eat, the list is endless ! I cannot eat seafood. As far as fruits and vegetables, my choices are very limited. I cannot drink alcohol because of my Acid Reflux disease. I absolutely MUST stay away from greasy foods, this is a huge trigger for me. Food cooked at home is the best choice because I know what the ingredients are in my meal. Meat must be lean meat. I just saw a Nutritionist three months ago. She was expensive and was not covered by my health insurance, but I wanted to know what she had to say. She had some very good recommendations and goals for me. She also introduced me to healthy smoothies, so I bought a NutriBullet blender and I have a healthy smoothie almost every morning. One of my smoothies contains banana, apple, carrot juice, soy milk, plain Greek yogurt, honey and vanilla ( and some mini-ice cubes to keep it chilled ). I USED to just drink a cup of coffee in the morning and then I wouldn't eat all day long. So at least NOW I am getting some nutrition in the morning and not starving myself all day long. I also gave up candy three months ago. So no caffeine or candy for me any more.
02-19-2015, 03:37 PM   #6
SmellyMelly
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So during a flare you want to reduce the stress and amount of work your GI track has to do, so I was told it's best to stick to these points: Eat six small-ish meals a day (breakfast, mid-morning snack, lunch, mid-afternoon snack, dinner, snack 2 hours before bed). Milk should be 1%/2% lactose free. Cheese/dairy should also be low fat. Only eat white breads (white, sour dough, potato, buttermilk etc), white rice's, white pasta.
Thank you for posting this. Shows that one mans healing foods are another mans poison.

If I ate any of those things - I would flare. So no way on earth I would do them during a flare.

I have found that dairy and (more so) gluten are particularly bad for my UC - so that cuts out milk, cheese, white bread and pasta.

And six small meals a day would be far too much - I would never get off the loo

For me personally, the best thing to do during a flare (to reduce the stress on my GI track) is to stop eating solid food entirely.

I basically fast on liquids. I drink things like filtered water, Thai drinking coconut water, herbal teas, freshly prepared vegetable juices, chia seed gel and chicken bone broth.

Recently went for three weeks like this and my flare cleared up.

I got much of this information from my own research, but also from a nutritionist & naturopath too.
02-19-2015, 05:03 PM   #7
Ann Morgan
Senior Member
Thank you for posting this. Shows that one mans healing foods are another mans poison.

If I ate any of those things - I would flare. So no way on earth I would do them during a flare.

I have found that dairy and (more so) gluten are particularly bad for my UC - so that cuts out milk, cheese, white bread and pasta.

And six small meals a day would be far too much - I would never get off the loo

For me personally, the best thing to do during a flare (to reduce the stress on my GI track) is to stop eating solid food entirely.

I basically fast on liquids. I drink things like filtered water, Thai drinking coconut water, herbal teas, freshly prepared vegetable juices, chia seed gel and chicken bone broth.

Recently went for three weeks like this and my flare cleared up.

I got much of this information from my own research, but also from a nutritionist & naturopath too.
I find that a liquid diet for me is best sometimes too. I have a smoothie once a day, but still eat things like mac n cheese and cereal/milk. I eat such a small variety of food at home, it gets boring. I rarely eat out, only when relatives are in town. Having small meals works for me too. I have Acid reflux, so eating less at one time is good for this too. Recently went to eat Mexican food with my sister. She ate her entire combo plate very fast. I ate only 1/2 of my food and took the rest to go. I am a VERY slow eater. Thanks for listening.
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