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04-17-2014, 07:09 PM   #1
wellhello
 
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Urinary Trac/ Bladder pressure

You won't believe this. I found that bladder pressure/uti can worsen bowel pressure. I tried mixing this "natural remedy." It's potassium betartrate with water. Here's what's funny potassium bitartrate is Cream of tartar- yes the spice aisle in the grocery store!! It worked for bladder/urinary tract pressure. tastes like crap, but a tsp in a glass of water, stir, drank. worked!
04-19-2014, 11:00 PM   #2
Ozboz
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what symptoms were you having i'm having bladder issues due to my crohn's and all I got from urologist was it's the nerves around or near bladder due to crohn's
04-22-2014, 10:56 AM   #3
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what symptoms were you having i'm having bladder issues due to my crohn's and all I got from urologist was it's the nerves around or near bladder due to crohn's
I had great pressure, urgency, and burning. It subsided after the cream of tartar in about 40 minutes.
04-22-2014, 08:42 PM   #4
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sounds similar to what I'm having
But I got told by a urologist that it's the nerves around the blader that are inflamed or something like that due to the crohn's but I might try your solution
04-22-2014, 09:12 PM   #5
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What made you try this? Is it from some research or have you just been downing anything and seeing what happens? If the former, please link to some research studies, if the latter you should know that this isn't the best way to go, and doesn't actually prove anything as there are many different outside influences.
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Last edited by CrohnsChicago; 04-22-2014 at 11:28 PM. Reason: edited post
04-22-2014, 09:21 PM   #6
nogutsnoglory
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Either way if you do not have any evidence that this may help then can you please stop creating these threads as they will be deleted and you may find yourself banned.
I concur with rygon. Several moderators have asked you to provide sources for your claims.

Last edited by CrohnsChicago; 04-22-2014 at 11:07 PM. Reason: edited post
04-22-2014, 11:27 PM   #7
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wellhello, I also agree with rygon...

where did you hear about this "natural remedy" and it's relation to IBD? Please provide a source to share with users. Thank you.


You won't believe this. I found that bladder pressure/uti can worsen bowel pressure. I tried mixing this "natural remedy." It's potassium betartrate with water. Here's what's funny potassium bitartrate is Cream of tartar- yes the spice aisle in the grocery store!! It worked for bladder/urinary tract pressure. tastes like crap, but a tsp in a glass of water, stir, drank. worked!
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04-23-2014, 05:27 AM   #8
Ozboz
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Well I for one am going to try it medical science doesn't hold all the answers as I have found out
04-23-2014, 06:31 AM   #9
afidz
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It is strongly recommended to do your own research as well as speak to your doctor about your plans. There is no reference or credibility to the claim that mixing cream of tartar with water is a helpful, useful pr safe remedy.
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04-23-2014, 05:04 PM   #10
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"Cream of tartar has long been used as a remedy for a number of ailments. In medical studies, it has been shown to be an effective stool softener and, when combined with sodium bicarbonate in a polyethylene glycol-based suppository, as a treatment for chronic constipation [1, 2]. In addition, many websites recommend cream of tartar as “natural” remedy for a variety of conditions including cystitis, smoking cessation, and as a laxative [3–5]. Despite its myriad uses, there are no cases in the literature describing toxicity from ingesting cream of tartar. We report two cases in which ingestion of cream of tartar, as a purgative, resulted in life-threatening hyperkalemia.

In spite of its high potassium content and its widely reported beneficial effects, a search of an academic internet database using the terms cream of tartar or potassium bitartrate revealed no cases of poisoning. However, using a generic internet search engine, we were able to find one case in the medical literature. In 1837, the London Medical Gazette included a case report of the death of an employee of a company manufacturing ‘Morrison’s Pills’. These pills were said to be a “cure for all curable diseases,” and were peddled with the philosophy that the more you take the sooner you would get better. The report describes the worker having ingested four to five tablespoons of cream of tartar over the period of a day to “cool his stomach.” The patient developed vomiting and diarrhea (“…had been severely purged”) and developed symptoms of dehydration and muscle weakness (“The thighs and legs appeared paralysed”). Despite “treatment” with an opiate, he died approximately 36 h after ingestion [9]. The ingredients of these pills were later analyzed and found to include aloe, colocynth, gamboge, ginger, and the main ingredient cream of tartar.

Although our report and this one are separated by 175 years, they are very similar. Both cases describe persons ingesting cream of tartar for supposed health reasons and suffering GI symptoms and muscle weakness. While the cause of death in the 1837 report could not be determined, we can infer that the death was secondary to hyperkalemia.

Based on its formula (C4H5KO6), cream of tartar is 20 % potassium. A consumer bottle of cream of tartar usually contains about 28 g/oz; therefore, six tablespoons would be 3 oz or 84 g, of which 16.8 g (430 mmol) is potassium. To put this number in perspective, the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine recommend adults have at least 4.7 g (120 mmol) of potassium a day [11]. Therefore, our patients ingested 3.5 times than this daily recommendation.

Patients who have mild to moderate renal insufficiency and patients taking drugs which can increase serum potassium, like potassium-sparing diuretics or angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors, are routinely told to avoid ingesting potassium supplements and dietary salt substitutes to prevent hyperkalemia [12]. Cream of tartar should be added to the list of agents these patients should avoid. Although it is rare, persons without renal insufficiency or on drugs that increase potassium can also develop hyperkalemia by ingesting potassium. These cases, similar to ours, typically involve the acute ingestion of massive amounts of potassium [13–18]."


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3570668/

Cream of tartar is well known but keep in mind that you do risk your health and even life if you use too much. There are far better treatments out there for UTIs and cream of tartar is only listed as a possible treatment on biased health sites.

Our organs are extremely close together so when one area inflames is may put pressure on organs nearby. If you have active Crohn's or another form of IBD then it is possible to feel the need to urinate more often as pressure is being applied to the bladder. Treating the Crohn's/IBD is your only option. Constipation and even bowel obstructions will apply pressure as well. Always see your doctor and be tested for a UTI before any sort of treatment. No point in treating something you don't have.

Please don't aggravate your Crohn's Ozboz by inducing diarrhea and irritating your intestinal lining further. Once the Crohn's is treated properly then the pressure on your bladder will be relieved.
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04-23-2014, 09:07 PM   #11
wellhello
 
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What made you try this? Is it from some research or have you just been downing anything and seeing what happens? If the former, please link to some research studies, if the latter you should know that this isn't the best way to go, and doesn't actually prove anything as there are many different outside influences.
Gosh, no, not just "downing anything and seeing what happens." I didn't know that everything I posted would have to have so much backup evidence. I thought this was a more casual setting, and that people in the group simply exchanged what helped them and what didn't. Have I so misunderstood? I am an avid reader, have been interested and studied health issues for over 29 years, but am making no claims of being a doctor. Help me to be clear, as I am not wishing to "break rules." Is the casualness I referenced frowned upon, and no one shares newer ideas of what has helped them? I am no way angry in this question, so please do not read any "attitude" in it. I am honestly asking.
04-23-2014, 09:11 PM   #12
wellhello
 
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wellhello, I also agree with rygon...

where did you hear about this "natural remedy" and it's relation to IBD? Please provide a source to share with users. Thank you.
I read so much, from many a source. I read a great deal about natural remedies, but I'm speaking throughout years of varied reading. Is this a per-requisite to comment on this site? This question is meant in truth, no sarcasm. And the reason for linking to ibd, is that bladder pressure can cause pressure on the bowel. Hence, I put the two together, and thought others would benefit.
04-23-2014, 09:14 PM   #13
theOcean
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Gosh, no, not just "downing anything and seeing what happens." I didn't know that everything I posted would have to have so much backup evidence. I thought this was a more casual setting, and that people in the group simply exchanged what helped them and what didn't. Have I so misunderstood? I am an avid reader, have been interested and studied health issues for over 29 years, but am making no claims of being a doctor. Help me to be clear, as I am not wishing to "break rules." Is the casualness I referenced frowned upon, and no one shares newer ideas of what has helped them? I am no way angry in this question, so please do not read any "attitude" in it. I am honestly asking.
Usually, we're talking about FDA-approved medications. One of the things we try to be careful about is not to spread misinformation, and as a result when it comes to natural remedies or alternative medicines, it's a bit more important to show that there's information to back up what someone is saying. We don't want anyone to get sick, or have their health negatively-impacted, after all!

Some of us have also been wondering about what your diagnosis is, since that's relevant to whether or not it might work for other people on the forum, too. So it's not that being casual is frowned upon -- it's just that we want to make sure the information we're sharing is helping others rather than hurting them.
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04-23-2014, 09:18 PM   #14
wellhello
 
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"Cream of tartar has long been used as a remedy for a number of ailments. In medical studies, it has been shown to be an effective stool softener and, when combined with sodium bicarbonate in a polyethylene glycol-based suppository, as a treatment for chronic constipation [1, 2]. In addition, many websites recommend cream of tartar as “natural” remedy for a variety of conditions including cystitis, smoking cessation, and as a laxative [3–5]. Despite its myriad uses, there are no cases in the literature describing toxicity from ingesting cream of tartar. We report two cases in which ingestion of cream of tartar, as a purgative, resulted in life-threatening hyperkalemia.

In spite of its high potassium content and its widely reported beneficial effects, a search of an academic internet database using the terms cream of tartar or potassium bitartrate revealed no cases of poisoning. However, using a generic internet search engine, we were able to find one case in the medical literature. In 1837, the London Medical Gazette included a case report of the death of an employee of a company manufacturing ‘Morrison’s Pills’. These pills were said to be a “cure for all curable diseases,” and were peddled with the philosophy that the more you take the sooner you would get better. The report describes the worker having ingested four to five tablespoons of cream of tartar over the period of a day to “cool his stomach.” The patient developed vomiting and diarrhea (“…had been severely purged”) and developed symptoms of dehydration and muscle weakness (“The thighs and legs appeared paralysed”). Despite “treatment” with an opiate, he died approximately 36 h after ingestion [9]. The ingredients of these pills were later analyzed and found to include aloe, colocynth, gamboge, ginger, and the main ingredient cream of tartar.

Although our report and this one are separated by 175 years, they are very similar. Both cases describe persons ingesting cream of tartar for supposed health reasons and suffering GI symptoms and muscle weakness. While the cause of death in the 1837 report could not be determined, we can infer that the death was secondary to hyperkalemia.

Based on its formula (C4H5KO6), cream of tartar is 20 % potassium. A consumer bottle of cream of tartar usually contains about 28 g/oz; therefore, six tablespoons would be 3 oz or 84 g, of which 16.8 g (430 mmol) is potassium. To put this number in perspective, the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine recommend adults have at least 4.7 g (120 mmol) of potassium a day [11]. Therefore, our patients ingested 3.5 times than this daily recommendation.

Patients who have mild to moderate renal insufficiency and patients taking drugs which can increase serum potassium, like potassium-sparing diuretics or angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors, are routinely told to avoid ingesting potassium supplements and dietary salt substitutes to prevent hyperkalemia [12]. Cream of tartar should be added to the list of agents these patients should avoid. Although it is rare, persons without renal insufficiency or on drugs that increase potassium can also develop hyperkalemia by ingesting potassium. These cases, similar to ours, typically involve the acute ingestion of massive amounts of potassium [13–18]."


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3570668/

Cream of tartar is well known but keep in mind that you do risk your health and even life if you use too much. There are far better treatments out there for UTIs and cream of tartar is only listed as a possible treatment on biased health sites.

Our organs are extremely close together so when one area inflames is may put pressure on organs nearby. If you have active Crohn's or another form of IBD then it is possible to feel the need to urinate more often as pressure is being applied to the bladder. Treating the Crohn's/IBD is your only option. Constipation and even bowel obstructions will apply pressure as well. Always see your doctor and be tested for a UTI before any sort of treatment. No point in treating something you don't have.

Please don't aggravate your Crohn's Ozboz by inducing diarrhea and irritating your intestinal lining further. Once the Crohn's is treated properly then the pressure on your bladder will be relieved.
Jennifer- this is kind of a case in point for me; I'm getting some very critical feedback about several posts, such as this, demanding that I state my sources for all my comments. Please give direction- is it suitable to state to others some remedies that one finds helpful, and not have rock hard evidence and claims as to WHY it worked? I'm not sure why the demand is on MY comments, when others casually share what they are finding. No ill intent on my part- I just don't want to be singled out that I have PROVE everything I say, while others state some opinions, with no pressure to show where they got their information from. Thank you in advance, and no offense intended.
04-23-2014, 09:41 PM   #15
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I'll let Jennifer speak for herself but I can tell you that as patients we are desperate for solutions, sadly many businesses are also eager to capitalize on our desperation and sell all kinds of treatments and "cures" some being bogus and others downright dangerous. I think this leads many of us to be skeptical of some of the claims. I'm not suggesting you are selling anything but people do come here for advice and while not all advice will help everyone, we do try to show validity of why it may be helpful. Many of us, myself included are open to alternative treatments.
04-23-2014, 10:10 PM   #16
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this is kind of a case in point for me; I'm getting some very critical feedback about several posts, such as this, demanding that I state my sources for all my comments. Please give direction- is it suitable to state to others some remedies that one finds helpful, and not have rock hard evidence and claims as to WHY it worked? I'm not sure why the demand is on MY comments, when others casually share what they are finding. No ill intent on my part- I just don't want to be singled out that I have PROVE everything I say, while others state some opinions, with no pressure to show where they got their information from. Thank you in advance, and no offense intended.

The internet, and the world in general, is full of misinformation and half-truths. In an age of complete information saturation it's very easy for people to fall for the song of guttersharks, they'll tell you about cures and purification in an almost religious tone. While a doctor nervously stammers that this drug might make you feel better in three months but you need to do bloodtests every two weeks to make sure it's not killing you right now. It's not hard to see how desperate people sick people and those with the impossible task to care for them can fall for a nice face on an infomercial.

So it's important we, one of the largest IBD forums on the internet which gets thousands of visitors a day, set an example. We need to stand against quackery and pseudoscience because we are among the first places on the internet those who are sick find. We need to make sure we do what we can to make sure someone doesn't get attracted to the dangers of colloidal sliver or aloe vera or whatever new poison the quacks are peddling this week.

It might come off as harsh to demand proof of every bit of alternative medicine but to be silent, to let it stand, is to let it pass unchallenged and give it tact approval. To leave the scared and misinformed to fall victim and hurt themselves, or worse, die. The only person who benefits from complete informational freedom is the scam artist. We have to stand up for those who cannot or will not because neutrality in a time of crisis is a grievous sin.

Last edited by afidz; 04-23-2014 at 10:47 PM.
04-24-2014, 12:30 AM   #17
Jennifer
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Jennifer- this is kind of a case in point for me; I'm getting some very critical feedback about several posts, such as this, demanding that I state my sources for all my comments. Please give direction- is it suitable to state to others some remedies that one finds helpful, and not have rock hard evidence and claims as to WHY it worked? I'm not sure why the demand is on MY comments, when others casually share what they are finding. No ill intent on my part- I just don't want to be singled out that I have PROVE everything I say, while others state some opinions, with no pressure to show where they got their information from. Thank you in advance, and no offense intended.
There's nothing wrong with asking for sources. Most of us didn't think up the possible remedy etc ourselves or find it by accident. Most find this information from somewhere be it a website, friend/family member/random person in a doctor's office, book, news article, doctor etc. So it's important to share where we got the information so others can make a more informed decision for themselves .

For instance, I found a source from a credible website which shares scientific studies etc. Maybe your source isn't as credible and that's ok. Based off of the information shared members can make informed decisions rather than going by your word or even my word alone.

So if people are asking for sources from you from multiple posts you made then just share them so we can all benefit more.

Also we have many members who are trying alternative treatments and what's really nice is that they continue seeing their doctor and have tests done on a regular basis to make sure that it's working. Sometimes they continue to do well and sometimes they relapse but sharing this information is extremely beneficial to current and future members.

Keep in mind that you are not being singled out, we ask everyone for sources whenever they share a possible treatment that we haven't heard of before. Sure we could all look it up for ourselves but it's important that the person making the claim shares the source/s themselves.
04-24-2014, 03:40 PM   #18
wellhello
 
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I'll let Jennifer speak for herself but I can tell you that as patients we are desperate for solutions, sadly many businesses are also eager to capitalize on our desperation and sell all kinds of treatments and "cures" some being bogus and others downright dangerous. I think this leads many of us to be skeptical of some of the claims. I'm not suggesting you are selling anything but people do come here for advice and while not all advice will help everyone, we do try to show validity of why it may be helpful. Many of us, myself included are open to alternative treatments.
I hear you; I'm not out to give bad advice. I'm eager to share some great things that have helped, some recently, some, older experiences. Thanks for the kind manner in phrasing.
04-24-2014, 04:11 PM   #19
wellhello
 
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Usually, we're talking about FDA-approved medications. One of the things we try to be careful about is not to spread misinformation, and as a result when it comes to natural remedies or alternative medicines, it's a bit more important to show that there's information to back up what someone is saying. We don't want anyone to get sick, or have their health negatively-impacted, after all!

Some of us have also been wondering about what your diagnosis is, since that's relevant to whether or not it might work for other people on the forum, too. So it's not that being casual is frowned upon -- it's just that we want to make sure the information we're sharing is helping others rather than hurting them.

That's an honorable request, but I had sited a source regarding the blackberry concentrate- the Book put out by "Bottom Line." I additionally remember reading more from a book by a doctor on nutrition, but I can't remember his name, or the specific name of the book (I have to go through my bookshelves- not a speedy task, but I think I could find it to quote it soon.0

That's a very reputable book, and though I certainly don't agree with all things in it, I quoted from it. However, in every instance, I don't necessarily remember where exactly I'd read from, it's accumulative knowledge sometimes, and I don't "log" everything. I like to casually share some experiences I've had. It's a given that readers must do their own evaluating in anyone's comments. That's just intelligent.
Well, I didn't mean to stir up a hornet's nest, but I can see the general concern, and it's a fair. Thank you for allowing my input. I will do better to attempt to quote sources, or clearly say that I just can't remember where I read it. Acceptable? Thanks.
04-24-2014, 04:28 PM   #20
wellhello
 
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wellhello, I also agree with rygon...

where did you hear about this "natural remedy" and it's relation to IBD? Please provide a source to share with users. Thank you.
I don't think I responded to this where I heard this from. Some natural remedies books. but Jennifer's response just about covers it. Truly, it helped fast.
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