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Crohn's Disease Forum » Books, Multimedia, Research & News » Stressing out your body could help control chronic inflammation


05-10-2014, 09:15 PM   #1
nogutsnoglory
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Stressing out your body could help control chronic inflammation

"Could a bizarre regimen of breathing tamp down inflammation?

Deliberately stressing the body can suppress the immune system, and may help autoimmune disorders. The video of young Dutch adults lying barefoot and bare chested in the snow, swimming in frozen ponds, and purposely hyperventilating looks more like "Jackass" than legitimate biomedical research. But the findings emerging from their efforts may suggest new treatments for millions of Americans suffering from autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and multiple sclerosis.

If you place the human body under enough stress, this new study finds, the immune system will stand down. And that, in turn, may calm the systemic inflammation and relieve the pain and disability that comes with a chronically overactive immune response.

If the odd training that Dutch subjects undertook can be translated into a safe behavioral regimen for patients with autoimmune disorders, the result could be an alternative to the costly medicines now used to treat those diseases.

The new research challenges two long-held beliefs about human health: that the autonomic nervous system -- often called the "involuntary nervous system" -- is not subject to training in ways that would override its control of functions such as as heart rate, blood pressure, breathing, perspiration and digestion; and that no behavioral intervention (short of, say, going to the doctor's office and getting a vaccination) can influence the immune system to spin up or stand.

In this experiment, reported Monday in the journal PNAS, a small group of healthy Dutch subjects was taught to follow a bizarre regimen of cold exposure, meditation and breathing patterns that alternated between hyperventilation and breath-holding. They continued to practice the routine of extreme physical stressors in the days and hours before exposure to a toxin that reliably causes flu-like symptoms.

Compared with a control group, the subjects that followed the bizarre practices saw their epinephrine levels rise higher than those reported by bungee jumpers in a separate study. Their production of the anti-inflammatory substance IL-10 shot up with exposure to an infused toxin, and the innate immune response, which would have sent forth a host of inflammatory signals to fight the invader, was suppressed.

The Dutch researchers who conducted the study called their experiment a "proof of principle," and acknowledged that "it remains to be determined" whether patients with chronic autoimmune diseases could safely practice any version of the bizarre body-stressing routine that tamped down immune response in healthy volunteers. But if some behavioral interventions could bring temporary relief from symptoms -- or if the physiological reactions induced here could be brought about by more easily tolerated means -- those suffering the effects of chronic inflammation could have some new, non-pharmaceutical ways to ease their suffering."

http://www.latimes.com/science/scien...505-story.html
05-10-2014, 10:47 PM   #2
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That's crazy. I swear there are studies to make a case for absolutely everything.
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05-11-2014, 07:10 AM   #3
nogutsnoglory
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Well it's not all that different than the hygiene hypothesis. It's another attempt at tricking a faulty immune system.
05-11-2014, 07:35 AM   #4
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How bizarre. I'm sure for many it's stress that cause the flare ups. However, I won't dismiss anything lol. Now, what bizarre act to choose. >.<
05-11-2014, 08:10 AM   #5
nogutsnoglory
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I think it's mental stress that aggravates flares but this is physical exertion on the body which is different. Please don't try this at home its a very preliminary look at this theory and definitely not safe or suitable as is.
05-11-2014, 10:52 AM   #6
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I would have to agree with the mental stress being a primary factor for many people's flares. Wondering if adrenaline rushes would do the same? As in help not hinder
05-12-2014, 05:03 PM   #7
Cat-a-Tonic
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I wonder if this would translate into exercise? I'm definitely stressing my body and breathing heavily when I work out. This is probably just coincidence, but over the past year I've both been in a mild flare and I've continued working out as often as I can - I wonder if stressing out my body with exercise somehow kept my flare on the mild end of things?
05-12-2014, 05:44 PM   #8
Axelfl3333
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The physical stress from a work out is good for everyone it's the endorphin effect it seems the help a lot of chronic illness.but bizarrely there's an enzyme in your blood that goes high after a hard workout which is good but is also present after a heart attack,obviously bad very strange.
05-12-2014, 06:25 PM   #9
D Bergy
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I used to be half owner of a moving business. We worked our butts off and physical stress was 90% of the job. After I sold out to my partner, things quickly unravelled for me. Coincidentally, I also had one of the most mentally stressful times with one of my children.

I have always suspected a good physical workout helps a person stay healthy, but I did not know it was quite that important.

Interesting findings, but I'm not going to get back into the moving business. A little to old for that now.

Dan
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05-14-2014, 10:51 AM   #10
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They say,

"the innate immune response, which would have sent forth a host of inflammatory signals to fight the invader, was suppressed"

Crohn's is supposed to caused by a reduction in innate immunity, so I'm not sure these kinds of activities would be beneficial for Crohns.
05-14-2014, 11:50 AM   #11
nogutsnoglory
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I have always been under the impression that it's the opposite and our immune system hyperactive and fighting when it shouldn't be which leads to unnecessary inflammation.
05-14-2014, 01:06 PM   #12
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there's the adaptive immune system which is thought to be over reactive and then there's the innate immune system which is thought the be under reactive/ ineffective.

The wikipedia or Crohn briefly touches on the subject.
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