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Crohn's Disease Forum » Diet, Fitness, and Supplements » Regarding green smoothies and slippery elm bark tea


05-29-2014, 10:04 PM   #1
antbobsgrashoper
 
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Regarding green smoothies and slippery elm bark tea

1) when it comes to the green smoothies: i would love to drink these. my topmost concern is the fiber content. i know: there are two types of fiber (soluble (partially dissolves in water: beans, peas, lentils, oatmeal, oat bran, nuts, seeds, psyllium, apples, pears, strawberries, and blueberries) and insoluble (passes through the digestive tract, absorbing and ridding the body of unwanted chemicals and particles: whole grains, barley, couscous, brown rice, bulgur, wheat bran, nuts, seeds, carrots, cucumbers, zucchini, celery, green beans, dark leafy veggies, raisins, nuts, grapes, and tomatoes); 2g fiber is considered low fiber (what i stay at/below during survival mode cuz fiber can irritate a flare), 5g and up is considered high fiber; men need 38g and women need 24g each day; high fiber sources are: beans, peas, lima beans, soybeans, chickpeas, black-eyed peas, artichokes, whole wheat flour, barley, bulgur, cornmeal, bran, raspberries, blackberries, and prunes; medium fiber sources are: lettuce, dark leafy greens, broccoli, okra, cauliflower, sweet potatoes, carrots, pumpkin, potatoes, corn, snap beans, asparagus, cabbage, whole wheat pasta, popcorn, nuts, raisins, pears, strawberries, oranges, bananas, blueberries, mangoes, and apples; low fiber sources are: refined wheats, refined pastas, and white rice. so my question is this: i had a banana smoothie (1 banana, 1c coconut milk, ice) after three days of just liquids (survival mode: 100% cranberry juice, unsweetened coconut milk, hemp milk, enriched rice milk, rice/quinoa milk, coffee, water), and ended the day with gut-wrenching pain. i'm trying to get to a point where i can handle solids-turned-smoothie. does anyone have any suggestions on the fiber ranking of the most nutritionally beneficial fruits/veggies so i can gradually add the more fibrous elements? also: does food 'lose' fiber if prepared properly - ie: the difference between raw kale, baked kale, boiled kale, kale-smoothie, etc?
2) i was just recommended trying slippery elm bark powder. i love teas. i love teas that help love me (anti-inflammatory, stress-relief, anti-depressant, anti-oxidants). after some additional research, i ordered some slippery elm off amazon and am anxious to experiment with its effects. does anyone have any knowledge or experience with slippery elm bark?

Last edited by antbobsgrashoper; 05-29-2014 at 11:37 PM.
05-29-2014, 10:52 PM   #2
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If you're worried about the smoking, you could always try vaporizing the medicinal marijuana instead. That would also be much better for your lungs and then there's no carcinogens that way. We have a Medical Marijuana section on the forum if you want to check that out! People are happy to give recommendations and advice there. I wish I could help more, but I've only been using it for sleep/neurological issues and not my Crohn's. I'm told that you need to have a high CBD strain (with low-to-mid THC I believe?) and that over time it helps function as an immunomodulator and reduces and prevents inflammation.
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05-29-2014, 11:15 PM   #3
antbobsgrashoper
 
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thanks for the response. i'll move that last inquiry to the appropriate section and see what help i can find. i'm so grateful i found this forum.
05-30-2014, 02:19 AM   #4
SarahD
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Hi antbobsgrashoper, I tried slippery elm capsules for a while. They seemed to have a small positive effect on my Crohn's at first, though after I stopped them and started them again I didn't notice any difference. I also tried opening the capsules and making a tea with the powder, but wasn't overly keen on the taste. I'm not a big tea drinker in the first place though and if you're a tea lover then you may well find it ok. It wasn't a bad taste by any means, just bland really.

I hope you seem some positive results anyway. Please do report back and let us know!
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05-30-2014, 03:19 AM   #5
Susan2
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Hi and

I tried using slippery elm powder in liquid for quite a long time but saw negligible effect, I'm afraid.
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05-30-2014, 12:24 PM   #6
antbobsgrashoper
 
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thanks for the replies, susan and sarah. i'm sorry to hear my first two testimonies regarding slippery elm to be so mild. i know teas can only do so much - which is partly why i like them: mild enough to potentially make small positive effects on a daily basis (like chamomile and lavender to help calm stress and soothe my insomnia) without the stress and worry of them dominating over other drugs. i'll keep an eye on what slippery elm does for me so i can endorse/condemn it for anyone else who might be interested.
08-27-2014, 07:23 AM   #7
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Hello,

I am curious if the elm bark tea has worked for you? I've read that green smoothies are good for Crohn's, but I am nervous since most of the things added to the smoothies are on the NO-NO list for Crohn's patients out of remission....Any thoughts about this subject anyone?
09-01-2014, 07:32 PM   #8
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I tried using slippery elm powder.

I have masses of information on Slippery Elm, as it was my “study herb” last term.

I will re-post all my findings here for you shortly

Briefly:

Tablet or capsules are no good – you need the powder to coat the entire GIT (mouth to anus) and capsules will not do that.

You must not drink it dry; as this can cause acute pain for IBD sufferers.

You must stir one teaspoon of powder into 100 mls of water or juice, mix together thoroughly, and then wait ten minutes for the water to absorb the powder and it forms sticky gluggy mucilage. Then you can consume it mixed with more water or juice.

It is very important to drink a lot of fluids, because it can dry the bowel and cause blockages otherwise. But as long as you drink adequate water throughout the day you will be fine.

Not all Slippery Elms are created equal. I think from memory that the best bark is red and it is also the most expensive. The white bark is often used in supplements but this does not have as many medicinal properties.

Buy the best quality one you can find. When I went to buy my supply they had white bark for $12.00 and the red bark one I brought for $39.00. You have to really read the packaging well or contact the manufactures, as the ingredients listing tends to be very vague about the exact species.

The botanical name Ulmus rubra should mean inner bark of the red elm tree.

If Slippery Elm is too intense for you, then Althaea officinalis (Marshmallow root powder) is gentler alternative that does the same thing.

Both of these herbs will help move things along if you are constipated; but also they have a reflex effect and will stop diarrhoea. Sounds odd I know to do both but most things with mucilage work this way (Chia Seed Gel is another one) - I can type up a full explanation of how this works if anyone is interested?

I only use it in emergency situations if I have diarrhoea - as it stops it straight away.
09-01-2014, 07:51 PM   #9
DJW
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I'm hoping someone can help me out.

What is slippery elm supposed to do?
What is the medicinal ingredient?
What is the physiological action that is taking place?

I've heard this bark mentioned several times but never understood specifically what it did.

Thanks in advance for the help.
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09-01-2014, 07:52 PM   #10
SmellyMelly
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but I am nervous since most of the things added to the smoothies are on the NO-NO list for Crohn's patients out of remission....Any thoughts about this subject anyone?
What are things added to smoothies that are on the NO-NO list for Crohn's patients out of remission? My doctor never gave me any list. Can you list them here?

With smoothies you must start off very slowly……..as all that extra fiber can get you running for the loo if you are not use to it.

But this normally settles down very quickly as your body adjusts.

I have been drinking Green Smoothies several times a week for seven years now and they have done wonders for my digestion and energy levels associated with IBD.

A very simple smoothie for beginners could be:

A small handful of English spinach or baby spinach
A ripe banana (otherwise ripe papaya or paw paw is absolutely excellent for IBD sufferers)
Two cups of filtered water
Blend thoroughly until all spinach is completely pulverized and broken down
And then drink immediately before the spinach oxidizes.

Start off with more fruit, and then as you get used to it, reduce the fruit and increase the spinach.

I like the following, but it took me quite a while to reach this level:

Spinach
Blueberries
Hemp oil
Maca powder
Freshly extracted coconut flesh
Freshly extracted coconut water – one coconut normally covers one person

Buzz in a Vitamix blender (or Nutribullet) and within seconds you have a smooth easy digestible and nutritious drink or meal replacement.

Or if you add extra coconut flesh and less water, you can make a pudding and eat it with a spoon instead if drinking it.

I have millions of juice and smoothie recipes if you want some more?
09-02-2014, 01:15 PM   #11
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Hello! THANK YOU so much for all of your information about the tea and recipe for the "green smoothie". I have tried the marshmallow root in the past with no success, so hopefully the red root tea will be good!

Your information is very much appreciated...I would gladly take a copy of your full findings (if easily available), my e-mail is: [email protected]

The "no-no's" are different for everyone, but personally, my body has never been able to break-down just about every vegetable/fruit (whether in/out of remission), known to mankind (just like red meats, fat, and so forth) so I never even bothered to THINK about green smoothies. It was like a sick joke, since greens and fruits have been on my favorites list - forever.

I only recently started to make one green smoothie, daily and I have fun mixing it up with different vegies/fruits - they always have a different taste - so no boredom. I'll have to research the maca powder, but I definitely understand the benefits of hemp oil. What amounts do you use for a 2-serving smoothie?

I follow this gal on Megan Morris on pinterest (I'm new to the site) and I am sure there are many other people, but she changes things up and some great recipes. I need variety in order to stay interested and not get bored. I also learned about the different types of weeds - wild weeds - not the other kind - ;-) and the different benefits for the body...but I am not quite there. Just a food for thought for someone more experienced like yourself...

Again, I really appreciate all of the information/support here. I only recently started to have issues again - Catastrophic stress brought it on again - so bad for crohn's - so bad! Recently started meditating/yoga again...what difference and now that I KNOW I am getting my nutrients digested - I am slowly feeling stronger everyday.

Of course, the pain in unbearable at times, but I know it could be worse - and the daily improvements keep me positive!

Stay Happy and Healthy!!!
09-03-2014, 10:08 PM   #12
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Your information is very much appreciated...I would gladly take a copy of your full findings (if easily available)
Botanical Name:
Ulmus rubra

Common Name:
Slippery Elm

Main Constituents:
Mucilage

Active Constituents:
Mucilage, Starch and Tannins.
Minerals: Iron, Sodium, Calcium, Selenium, Iodine, Copper, Zinc and Potassium.

Parts Used:
Inner Bark (Powdered).
Use sparingly and with respect because tree is killed when inner bark removed
Red elm is the best quality

Mains Actions:
Anti-inflammatory
Demulcent
Emollient
Antitussive
Antistringent
Nutritive – “food as medicine”. You can make a mucilage beverage or make a bland gruel that is used as a nutritive food for babies, the elderly, the ill, those with lack of appetite or convalescents. American Native Indians used it to wean babies from breast milk to solid food.

There are many many more actions than this; but these are the most relevant to the topic on hand.

Uses Internally:
Inflammations or ulceration of the GIT (i.e.) IBD, IBS and Ulcers
Convalescence as an easy to digestive food
Anorexia
Constipation – can dry out bowel so use cautiously
Beneficial for the oesophagus and stomach.

Uses Externally:
Skin conditions, boils, abscesses, ulcers, minor wounds and burns.

Preparations:
Powder, Tea, Tonic, Suppositories and Tinctures.
Powder and tea you can purchase at supermarket. See a herbalist for the Tonic, Suppositories and Tinctures.

Cautions:
Make sure plenty of fluids (water) is taken when using Ulmus rubra in any form.
Must make a mucilage mix for IBS and IBD - do not take dry via mouth

Note:
Not a complete list by any means - but will help those who are confused about the subject.
09-04-2014, 06:48 AM   #13
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Thank you for the detailed info! I found an awesome natural food store where my new holistic doctor is thhe sells the red elm...yes it's pricy, but appears to be worth it. Ill buy it next week when I get my check....ill posr my results. Have a beautiful day! Stay Healthy!
09-07-2014, 10:00 PM   #14
SmellyMelly
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Antitussive
Opps

That has nothing to do with IBS/IBD

It has to do with coughing

Anyway everything else on the list has a IBS/IBD connection
09-07-2014, 10:01 PM   #15
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I cannot recommend this step highly enough:

Make sure you mix it with water and wait for the gel to form.

These instructions are not on the packet – or at least I have never seen them.

Ten years ago I made the mistake of putting one teaspoon of Slippery Elm powder in a glass of water and drinking it straight down.

My God! The pain! I was rolling around on the floor crying clutching myself.

If you don’t have IBS and IBD you could probably drink it straight?

But I say don’t risk it.

Add to water, stir and wait at least ten minutes for the water to absorb the water and produce a gel. Then add more water and OK to drink. Then follow up with more water.
09-16-2014, 10:02 PM   #16
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Additions for Smoothies

Organic:

Barley grass powder
Alfalfa grass powder
Wheat grass powder or freshly juiced
Spirulina powder
Chlorella powder
Maca powder
Mesquite powder
Cold pressed hemp oil
Raw cacao powder
Lucuma powder
Baobab powder

Start off with ½ - 1 teaspoon per person, blended up in the smoothie.

And if you don’t react; then increase to a tablespoon slowly over several weeks.

It is a good way to easily get additional nutrition from superfoods - that would otherwise maybe be difficult to incorporate into your diet.
09-29-2014, 12:39 AM   #17
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sun: my personal experimenting update: after a month of drinking 32oz hot water / gradual increase of 1ts to 1tb slippery elm bark powder (red) / 1 green tea packet / a splash of coconut milk once a day, the only difference i noted was increased amounts of facial oil production resulting in acne like i was back in high school; since stopping with the slippery elm bark, i haven't noticed any directly correlating improvement/harm in my gut pains. however, this experimenting also ran alongside starting my first Remicade infusions, which have kept me mostly pain-free since the second infusion. my experience with slippery elm: if you enjoy the taste, it won't hurt you (unless you're prone to pimples, maybe), but i can't guarantee it'll help you either. i still add it to my teas when i get the first signs of gut trouble; that, and dropping all solid food for two days for my liquid diet until the inflammation goes down, has kept me out of the ER for three months. woot.

smellymelly: thanks so much for your info. i'm grateful to know everything i can about the things that can hurt/help me and your research is really appreciated.

to answer my own questions: i have since learned: fiber is only found in plant foods - so anything that grows out of the ground (the flip side indicating that any meat - fish, shellfish, fowl, eggs, pork, beef (or its diary derivatives) - does not contain fiber (unless you ingest the gristle or bones)), and the only way to ingest a plant food without ingesting its fiber is to make a tea of it. it doesn't matter how you physically alter the food - chop / dice / mince / blend / grind / bake / steam / boil / broil - it still contains the same quality/quantity of fiber. however, if you were to boil a food, drain it, and drink the water or 'tea', then you have successfully 'eaten' a no-fiber plant food. tah-dah.

Last edited by antbobsgrashoper; 09-29-2014 at 12:52 AM. Reason: additional info
10-08-2014, 08:53 PM   #18
SmellyMelly
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the only difference i noted was increased amounts of facial oil production resulting in acne like i was back in high school; since stopping with the slippery elm bark, i haven't noticed any directly correlating improvement/harm in my gut pains. however, this experimenting also ran alongside starting my first Remicade infusions
The slippery elm does not stop gut pain. It stops diarrhea.

If I need to go out and I am flaring, then the slippery elm will stop the flare as it dries up the bowel. Enabling me to successfully leave the house without incident.

Also the acne is a side effect of Remicade.

Cheers

Mel
10-08-2014, 09:12 PM   #19
SmellyMelly
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to answer my own questions: i have since learned: fiber is only found in plant foods - so anything that grows out of the ground (the flip side indicating that any meat - fish, shellfish, fowl, eggs, pork, beef (or its diary derivatives) - does not contain fiber (unless you ingest the gristle or bones)), and the only way to ingest a plant food without ingesting its fiber is to make a tea of it. it doesn't matter how you physically alter the food - chop / dice / mince / blend / grind / bake / steam / boil / broil - it still contains the same quality/quantity of fiber. however, if you were to boil a food, drain it, and drink the water or 'tea', then you have successfully 'eaten' a no-fiber plant food. tah-dah.
Yes, you are correct.

The best sources of fiber are :

Raw and cooked fruit
Raw and cooked vegetables
Cooked brown rice / pulses / beans / lentils

There is no fiber in gluten, meat and dairy. And since gluten, meat and dairy, are also very hard to digest, they are not a good choice for people with C & UC, and other illnesses where the digestion and elimination system is compromised - the elderly, the frail, after surgery, etc...

Yes, if you were to boil a food, drain it, and drink the water or 'tea', then you have successfully 'eaten' a no-fiber plant food. It is officially called a broth.

These sorts of healing broths are great for C & UC or fasting or when you have flu and don't feel like eating but need nourishment. Another way of getting nourishment without consuming the fiber is by juicing.

You can survive for weeks and months on just healing broths, water, herbal teas and homemade juices, if need be. Many healthy people do it every year as part of a planned New Year detox. I do it to rest my bowel if flaring.

Sounds like you are doing well anyway.
10-29-2014, 04:59 PM   #20
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I love slippery elm - it soothes my system and as a daily additive it works great in concert with other things.

I like it in tincture form. Easy to absorb, easy to store, doesn't bother my tummy if I take it in the morning with my greens and l-glutamine.
10-29-2014, 07:22 PM   #21
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I also like slippery elm. I have collagenous colitis and it helps control the D. I use it in tea together with mint and chamomile because it is bland by itself. I stir the tea after it steeps and wait until it absorbs the liquid. One thing I have not seen addressed here is that some sources advise not to take the slippery elm together with pills. This is what I read and it makes sense:
"Slippery elm contains a type of soft fiber called mucilage. Mucilage can decrease how much medicine the body absorbs. Taking slippery elm at the same time you take medications by mouth can decrease the effectiveness of your medication. To prevent this interaction take slippery elm at least one hour after medications you take by mouth."
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