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01-22-2015, 02:10 AM   #1
Nym
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Nutrients 2015

Inclusion of Fermented Foods in Food Guides around the World -

Received: 14 October 2014 / Accepted: 4 January 2015 / Published: 8 January 2015

Abstract
: Fermented foods have been a well-established part of the human diet for thousands of years, without much of an appreciation for, or an understanding of, their underlying microbial functionality, until recently. The use of many organisms derived from these foods, and their applications in probiotics, have further illustrated their impact on gastrointestinal wellbeing and diseases affecting other sites in the body. However, despite the many benefits of fermented foods, their recommended consumption has not been widely translated to global inclusion in food guides. Here, we present the case for such inclusion, and challenge health authorities around the world to consider advocating for the many benefits of these foods.

Keywords:

food guides; world; fermented foods; fermentation; benefits; probiotics

1. Introduction

Recommendations for the consumption of certain nutritious foods date back to the Hippocratic Corpus of Ancient Greece. More recently, the United States Department of Agriculture first created nutrition guidelines in 1894 which advocated variety, proportionality and moderation, calorie measuring, nutrient-rich foods and consumption of less fat, sugar and starch [1]. Canada’s first Food Guide was introduced in July 1942, to provide guidance to Canadians on proper nutrition during a period when wartime rationing was common [2].

While such guidelines result from consultation with knowledge providers, they need not reflect traditions practiced by populations nor do they appreciate the benefits of foods consumed by generations of ethnic groups. Foods that are prepared by fermentation (the slow decomposition process of organic substances induced by microorganisms, or by complex proteinaceous substances (enzymes) of plant or animal origin [3]), occurs due to biochemical changes brought about by the anaerobic or partially anaerobic oxidation of carbohydrates. This process has long been shown to help retain shelf-life and prevent food spoilage. The absence of fermented foods from some food guides, as will be discussed later, should not be interpreted as suggesting these foods are not beneficial. Rather, they may not have had a history of use in a particular country, and may be made at home instead of being purchased from a commercial enterprise. The aim of the present article is to examine the history of fermented foods, their health benefits and the basis for why they are, or should be, included in the food guides of different countries across the continents. Such a review with evidence of the effectiveness of fermented foods, is one of the means that regulatory agencies, such as Health Canada, use to evaluate whether or not certain foods are worthy of inclusion in a revised food guide. -


http://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/7/1/390/htm

20 Amazing Benefits of Bone Broth


http://sweetbeetandgreenbean.net/201...of-bone-broth/
01-28-2015, 01:23 AM   #2
Nym
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More nutritional goodness!

DID YOU KNOW… WRINKLES and CELLULITE form, as we age, due to a loss of collagen? You can fill in fine lines and lose the dimples without spending a fortune on creams or injections, by drinking REAL BONE BROTH. It is rich in collagen and when we drink it, that collagen is directed to the parts of our body that need it the most, namely our skin! You won’t find real bone broth at the store, that is just spiced up water. Instead, use my healthy and easy recipe to make your own.

How To Make Beef Bone Broth: http://healthylivinghowto.com/1/post...-cure-all.html

Fish broth will cure anything. ~ South American Proverb

Indeed, stock is everything in cooking. . . without it nothing can be done. ~ Auguste Escoffier

Good broth resurrects the dead. ~ South American Proverb

On the GAPS dietary protocol, one that is meant for individuals to ‘heal & seal’ the gut lining, bone broth is at the center of the plan. It plays a critical role in soothing the gut and allowing the body to absorb critical nutrition in the most assimilable way. Loaded with minerals, one of our nation’s epidemic health issues, bone broth is a great way to replenish the bodies likely depleted mineral reserves. Let’s look at more ways that bone can truly nourish and benefit the body.

Bone broth contains gelatin a colloidal substance that attracts digestive juices to itself and prevents gastrointestinal bugs from attaching themselves to the gut wall and wreaking havoc. The gelatin in bone broth assists digestion.

Bone broth contains minerals such as calcium, silicon, sulphur, magnesium, phosphorous & trace minerals in an easily assimilable form. These minerals are pulled out of the bones in part due to using a vinegar solution prior to cooking. The vinegar helps to draw the mineral salts out of the bone. All of the minerals present in bones used for bone broth, except fluoride, are macro-minerals, which are essential for proper nutrition and are required in greater amounts than 100mg/day. The only macro-mineral not present in bone is chlorine. Minerals have numerous functions in the body beyond the composition of bone, which is why the body will rob the bones and tissues to maintain steady levels of minerals in the blood and other fluids. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in bone, it is also the most abundant mineral in the body. The calcium present in bone broth can be considered for use in the following deficiency signs, symptoms and conditions: pain and inflammation, cramps, muscle spasms, delusions, depression, insomnia, irritability, hyperactivity, anxiety, palpitations, hypertension, high cholesterol, allergies, brittle nails, periodontal and dental disease, pica, rickets, osteomalacia, osteoporosis and any situation that creates bone loss such as aging, immobilization, postmenopause, and caffeine,

http://divinehealthfromtheinsideout....acts-benefits/
01-30-2015, 08:31 PM   #3
David
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Thanks for sharing
01-31-2015, 01:16 PM   #4
Robrich
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Fermented foods and bone broths!
Both are essential healing foods esp for crohnies.
I have a PA fistula and the bone broths definitely help. When I stop using it the fistula activity increases and when I make a new batch it decreases. Probiotics are very complimentary and help improve BM, more solid more regular less bloating.
All of course once you've gone through the "die off" and established some sort of healthy environment in your gut.
If there are any 2things one should try diet wise these are it. Over time your gut will heal better with or without drugs.
Thanks NYM.
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Turmeric,paleo, bone broths
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01-31-2015, 06:01 PM   #5
InkyStinky
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Bone broth is soooo good! We have made budget cuts in other areas so that we can afford good quality "soup bones"!

And we've just started making sauerkraut. Not my favorite but I'll get used to it!
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01-31-2015, 11:28 PM   #6
David
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How do you make your bone broth Inky?
02-01-2015, 05:19 PM   #7
InkyStinky
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I've been using a crockpot. We've had kinda a time finding a source for "soup bones" - I used to get local pastured beef at our farmer's market in our old town... then we moved half way across the country. So I ordered a value pack of "Beef Shanks" from Tropical Traditions because they were on a huge sale at the end of last year. Anyway, the Shanks have quite a bit of meat on them so this is what I've been doing recently:

-- throw whatever meaty bones I have in the crockpot, add some salt, and cook them till the meat is done. (The broth tastes much better if the meaty bones are thawed totally before cooking, but this doesn't always happen! It also tastes better if I brown the meaty bones before slowcooking... but then I'd have to get more dishes dirty so I usually skip that part.)

-- when the meat is cooked through, I take it all out of the crockpot and cut the meat away from the bones/fat/connective tissue. The meat I keep for meals and the bones/etc go back into the crockpot.

-- fill the crockpot with water and a splash of raw apple cider vinegar; leave on low. It tastes best if I leave it for at least 72 hrs.

(I use more water than is recommended if you want the broth to "gel". Typically, I have bones/etc to cover the bottom of my large crock pot and then fill the whole thing with water.)

I haven't had great luck with adding veggies during the cooking phase... always tastes "off" to me...?

We just found a local source for pasture beef - I have to crunch some numbers but I think it will be more affordable than mail ordering. So I now have beef short ribs and an oxtail in the freezer. Am researching recipes for oxtail broth as I've never cooked oxtail before!

Edit: Haha! Think I mentally blocked out the whole straining process. I use thin cotton towels (actually, old school single ply baby diapers - new of course!), and line a colander over a bowl with a towel and scoop everything out of the crockpot into the colander. The I strain again with a clean part of the towel over a small mesh strainer into a big pyrex measuring cup. Then I pour the strained broth into jars and repeat the whole process until all the broth is strained. It's kinda a messy business! The towels I wash with a few loads of dishes (...no dishwasher...!) until they don't feel greasy, then I wash them with a load of kitchen towels.

It takes awhile, but by double straining through towels I typically avoid any sediment in the broth.

Last edited by InkyStinky; 02-01-2015 at 05:34 PM.
02-02-2015, 09:20 AM   #8
DEmberton
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I tried making sauerkraut a couple of times last year, but it didn't really work out. Just ended up with mouldy salty cabbage.

I made Kefir for a while; a bit of an acquired taste - sort of cheesy yoghurty milk. I don't know if it did me any good, but it's meant to be a good alternative for anyone that can't handle lactose.
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02-02-2015, 02:44 PM   #9
David
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Thank you so much. Sounds delicious! My wife is a vegetarian so I don't get to eat bone broth near as much as I'd like. But such is life.
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