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06-03-2015, 08:51 AM   #1
crohnsinct
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Mustard Greens

•The cholesterol-lowering ability of steamed mustard greens is second only to steamed collard greens and steamed kale in a recent study of cruciferous vegetables and their ability to bind bile acids in the digestive tract. When bile acid binding takes place, it is easier for the bile acids to be excreted from the body. Since bile acids are made from cholesterol, the net impact of this bile acid binding is a lowering of the body's cholesterol level. It's worth noting that steamed mustard greens (and all steamed forms of the cruciferous vegetables) show much greater bile acid binding ability than raw mustard greens.
•For total glucosinolate content, mustard greens rank high on the list of commonly eaten cruciferous vegetables, and in one study, were second only to Brussels sprouts in terms of total glucosinolate content. Glucosinolates are phytonutrients that provide us with unique health benefits because they can be converted into isothiocyanates (ITCs) that have cancer-preventive properties. All cruciferous vegetables have long been known to contain glucosinolates, but it's recent research that's made us realize how valuable mustard greens are in this regard.
•The cancer protection we get from mustard greens may be largely related to two special glucosinolates found in this cruciferous vegetable: sinigrin and gluconasturtiian. Sinigrin can be converted into allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC) and gluconasturtiian can be converted into phenethyl-isothiocyanate (PEITC). Both AITC and PEITC have well-documented cancer-preventive and anti-inflammatory properties.

Mustard Greens, cooked
1.00 cup
(140.00 grams)

Calories: 36
GI: very low


NutrientDRI/DV


vitamin K922%

vitamin A96%

vitamin C47%

copper22%

manganese19%

calcium17%

vitamin E17%

fiber11%

vitamin B68%

phosphorus8%

iron7%

vitamin B27%

protein7%

potassium6%

magnesium5%

vitamin B15%

vitamin B34%

pantothenic acid3%

folate3%

Health Benefits

The connection between mustard greens and cancer prevention should not be surprising since mustard greens provide special nutrient support for three body systems that are closely connected with cancer development as well as cancer prevention. These three systems are (1) the body's detox system, (2) its antioxidant system, and (3) its inflammatory/anti-inflammatory system. Chronic imbalances in any of these three systems can increase risk of cancer, and when imbalances in all three systems occur simultaneously, the risk of cancer increases significantly. Among all types of cancer, prevention of the following cancer types is most closely associated with intake of mustard greens: bladder cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and ovarian cancer.

Detox Support Provided by Mustard Greens

The detox support provided by mustard greens includes antioxidant nutrients to boost Phase 1 detoxification activities and sulfur-containing nutrients to boost Phase 2 activities. Mustard greens also contain phytonutrients called glucosinolates that can help activate detoxification enzymes and regulate their activity. At least three key glucosinolates have been clearly identified in mustard greens in significant amounts: sinigrin, gluconasturtiian, and glucotropaeolin.

If we fail to give our body's detox system adequate nutritional support, yet continue to expose ourselves to unwanted toxins through our lifestyle and our dietary choices, we can place our bodies at increased risk of toxin-related damage that can eventually increase our cells' risk of becoming cancerous. That's one of the reasons it's so important to bring mustard greens and other cruciferous vegetables into our diet on a regular basis.

The Antioxidant Benefits of Mustard Greens

As an excellent source of vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin A (in the form of carotenoids), and manganese, mustard greens give us high level support for four conventional antioxidant nutrients. But the antioxidant support provided by mustard greens extends far beyond these conventional nutrients and into the realm of phytonutrients. Hydroxycinnamic acid, quercetin, isorhamnetin, and kaempferol are among the key antioxidant phytonutrients provided by mustard greens. This broad spectrum antioxidant support helps lower the risk of oxidative stress in our cells. Chronic oxidative stress—meaning chronic presence of overly reactive oxygen-containing molecules and cumulative damage to our cells by these molecules—is a risk factor for development of most cancer types. By providing us with a diverse array of antioxidant nutrients, mustard greens help lower our cancer risk by helping us avoid chronic and unwanted oxidative stress.

Mustard Greens' Anti-inflammatory Benefits

As an excellent source of vitamin K, mustard greens provide us with great amounts of a hallmark anti-inflammatory nutrient. Vitamin K acts as a direct regulator of our inflammatory response. While glucobrassicin (a glucosinolate found in many cruciferous vegetables, and the precursor for the anti-inflammatory molecule indole-3-carbinol) does not appear to be present in mustard greens in significant amounts, other glucosinolates present in mustard greens may provide important anti-inflammatory benefits and are the subject of current research.

Like chronic oxidative stress and chronic weakened detox ability, chronic unwanted inflammation can significantly increase our risk of cancers and other chronic diseases (especially cardiovascular diseases).
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Last edited by crohnsinct; 06-03-2015 at 12:46 PM. Reason: typo
06-03-2015, 02:20 PM   #2
Mr chicken
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Sounds good as long as I don't have to eat them
06-03-2015, 02:37 PM   #3
Clash
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I'll eat them after the nutrients have been completely cooked away and replaced with all the fatty happiness of the hambone I cooked w/ it.
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06-03-2015, 03:10 PM   #4
Farmwife
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Never had them! Can you eat it raw like in a salad or does it taste better steamed?????
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06-03-2015, 05:06 PM   #5
crohnsinct
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You guys!!!

Most people steam or braise them. You could chop them up and add them to a potato salad raw. Adds a nice mustardy taste.

But clash is right. Cook 'em with some bacon and some broth and yeeeuuum y'all. Add some cannelloni beans to give it some redeeming value!
06-03-2015, 05:51 PM   #6
Clash
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I don't think I've ever met a Southerner that has steamed a mustard green!!!! But your post excited me enough to call my Mom and ask her to pick up some mustards at the open market and as I type I'm eating collards seasoned with pork! haha! It would've been mustards but Mom said they all looked puny! LMAO!
06-03-2015, 08:37 PM   #7
crohnsinct
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LOL! Clash! Tonight I made them the southern way and I don't think I will ever get my family to eat them steamed again! OMGosh! They were beyond delish! I only got two bunches from our CSA and the girls are salivating asking for more...I didn't have the heart to tell them more would be cooked the "northern" way.
06-03-2015, 08:49 PM   #8
Clash
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I love my greens- turnips, collards mustards! I guess I will have to give the steamed ones a shot. I don't know why I haven't ever thought of steamed greens I mean I loved steamed cabbage but then again it has bacon drippings as well!!!
06-03-2015, 08:57 PM   #9
crohnsinct
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Lordy! Do you people eat anything without grease?!

Seriously though...try chopping some mustards up raw and throwing them in a potato salad...OMGosh! Divine! Of course you can use some mayo...but for the love of God please no bacon! I know, I know...what's the point?
06-03-2015, 09:02 PM   #10
Clash
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yeah there is absolutely bacon in my Mom's potato salad but not mine so I might be redeemable!
06-04-2015, 06:24 AM   #11
DanceMom
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I may be the only southerner that will not eat mustard greens. My husband thinks I'm ridiculous. His uncle grows them every year so they are the main attraction at Christmas, lol. And I don't need bacon in my potato salad, but I do need it in deviled eggs! Yum!
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06-04-2015, 07:13 AM   #12
Farmwife
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Yummy, bacon in potato salad............must try!
I might be a pure northern but I'm southern when it comes to food!
06-11-2015, 04:15 PM   #13
WingedVictory
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I quite like my greens, especially the Trader Joe's southern blend which consists of mustard, turnip, collard and spinach. I only steam them these days. It's been awhile since I drowned them in bacon grease.

I will have to add bacon sometime, sounds like a winning combo.
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