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Crohn's Disease Forum » Diet, Fitness, and Supplements » Terminal ileum pain triggered by exercising?


12-17-2015, 04:25 AM   #1
Charlotte.
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Terminal ileum pain triggered by exercising?

Hi guys,

I did some exercising yesterday, not long (my arthritis is active as well), but with weights and many squat variations. Yesterday evening I had increased pain in the terminal ileum area (where my inflammation is). Could that worsening be triggered by exercising?
Normally I only do some yoga movements and road biking.

Any ideas?
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Crohn's Disease: diagnosed 2014 (at 24), symptoms for 10 years now
Enteropathic Arthritis, Sacroliitis, Osteopenia

Stelara; Uceris; Lansoprazole; Domperidone.

Previously: Remicade, Humira, Simponi, Azathioprine, Methotrexate, Sulfasalazine, Entocort, Uceris, Prednisolone, TPN, EEN, different alternative treatments.
12-17-2015, 01:50 PM   #2
wildbill_52280
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Join Date: Sep 2009
It's possible the heavy exercise created a temporary state of intestinal permeability where contents of the intestine like undigested food, bacteria etc, came through the small opening of the intestinal cells and created some inflammation or something. so its possible the exercise is related to the pain. http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/...nalCode=jprobs
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12-17-2015, 03:27 PM   #3
Charlotte.
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Thank you so much, wildbill! I didn't expect there was a study performed with soldiers doing training! A massive thank you for the link! I'm impressed, there are much more short term changes in the gut, than I had imagined. Such a shame that only the abstract is available free of charge or without VPN client.
I was thinking more of the exercising itself in a physical way, as it puts pressure on the intestines, especially the lower right and lower left quadrants while squatting, okay, the molecular changes in addition, I don't have any questions left.
It improved over night and did not come back today, now it's as if nothing has happened, regarding the terminal ileum pain.
12-17-2015, 06:48 PM   #4
wildbill_52280
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Join Date: Sep 2009
Thank you so much, wildbill! I didn't expect there was a study performed with soldiers doing training! A massive thank you for the link! I'm impressed, there are much more short term changes in the gut, than I had imagined. Such a shame that only the abstract is available free of charge or without VPN client.
I was thinking more of the exercising itself in a physical way, as it puts pressure on the intestines, especially the lower right and lower left quadrants while squatting, okay, the molecular changes in addition, I don't have any questions left.
It improved over night and did not come back today, now it's as if nothing has happened, regarding the terminal ileum pain.
its completely within the biochemistry, possibly from a state of oxidative stress or the healing that takes place as a result of muscle damage, something like that. but it has nothing to do with the muscle movements itself, its not "mechanical" on that large of a scale at least, but i believe that is possible perhaps to puncture and intestine if your in a bad disease state and maybe someone jabs in the gut hard enough.
12-26-2015, 08:07 PM   #5
SauceySciencey
 
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I would be skeptical that this was the case. Unless Charlotte is telling us that she undertook 6 weeks of heavy combat training (< 5 hours sleep a day (broken by the ocassional 3 am drill), continuous repetitive physical labor in a chem warfare suit in a tropical environment). Furthermore, in this study testing occured after baseline only at week 4) - the results whilst significant statistically are not overtly high, at least to suggest one session of exercise could induce pain and this idea being causative.

Start with the simple explanations first. On occasion the crunching effort of a rowing machine where I lean forward can induce post-exercise pain in my TI (where I was diagnosed). However, it varies. One day, I can pump 30 minutes and have slight twinges in my gut - another day I rowed 1.5 hours (15 kilometers) and felt fantastic. If it was painful everytime, I wouldn't row, and would stick to the exercise bike.

One could hypothesise that the mechanical action might have induced this. It may not necessarily come up painful immediately. Furthermore, the exercise itself, especially squats, could have resulted in increased blood flow to your abdomen (muscles swell after exercise) which could have induced the pain by pressure. The fact the pain went away the next day as if nothing was wrong suggests this as a possible reason.

Furthermore, it has been shown that post-exercise, inflammatory mediators are raised, especially muscle building exercises - this also could be a reason. However, countering this are studies that long term exercise lowers overall inflammatory mediators. So don't take that as reason not to do these kinds of exercises .

Try the exercise again, but go lighter, build it up and stop if you get pain post-workout, and go back down to the lighter level/load/number of reps etc. Best of all, don't give up on finding the right exercises for you. I just need progress, not perfection, is what I always tell myself. Little steps
01-01-2016, 11:23 AM   #6
Charlotte.
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Thank you so much, SauceySciencey!
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