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Crohn's Disease Forum » Books, Multimedia, Research & News » Team identifies fungus in humans for first time as key factor in Crohn's disease


 
09-28-2016, 11:04 PM   #31
D Bergy
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Reminds me of Malariotherapy for AIDS & Syphylus.

Dan
09-29-2016, 02:11 AM   #32
IWishICouldHide
 
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This validates much of my recent studies. Though there are many organisms causing effects. The real problem is that many different pathogens are working together in symbiosis, while many Crohn's patients have a lowered amount of beneficial symbiotes of their own. We culled our worms (helminths) which can effect our immune response to antigens in these biofilms, and lost our beneficial bacteria and yeasts all of which can compete with and kill other microbes. This is most likely caused by environment and genetics. Constant exposure to negative microbes coupled with poor exposure to healthy microbes allowed them to out-compete and thrive in susceptible individuals with specifically compromised innate immune systems. It makes me think certain enzymes such as Dispersin B (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dispersin_B) in addition to digestive enzymes, antibiotic, prebiotic, probiotic, and immune treatment all taken together for a long period* could "cure" Crohn's by replacing the pathogenic biofilm with a symbiotic one. Or rather, cause long term remission coupled with a long term custom diet.

*dropping the antibiotics after an appropriate time

Last edited by IWishICouldHide; 09-29-2016 at 04:04 AM.
09-29-2016, 12:04 PM   #33
mf15
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Just did a semi controlled experiment.
Bathtub hot water, but could have stood hotter, did not measure temp, my bad.
Tub too short so knees and of course head was exposed.
Measured oral temp with good old mercury thermometer, yes still have one.

Started 98.6 F - End 101.8 F after 20 minutes.
First 5 min temp did not move much, then felt head start to sweat, then temp started to move.
Still sweating as I write this. This was continuous monitoring of temp.

So it takes 20 or so minutes to get to 101.8 F lets see what happens with poo,and blood.
I expect not much but you never know. In that AS hyperthermia paper they did multiple
heat soaks. I have no sauna or hot tub so bath tub was the best approach to do this. Water temp somewhere between 110-115 F went back and
checked.
EDIT:Today 9/30/16 still have blood, stools seem hard as a rock, tuff getting past anal stenosis.
But they came out, normal for me is soft.
Did another bath, set temp in tub to 110 F,20 minutes.

Old Mike
__________________
UC-1980 Still smoke-No Meds. Still have UC.

Last edited by mf15; 09-30-2016 at 10:59 AM.
09-29-2016, 12:21 PM   #34
D Bergy
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Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

I would try it. Actually I do anyway. I have a traditional Finnish sauna.

Can't say if it helps or not. If it does, it is not obvious. But it is hard to stay in a 170 degree room until you get dizzy. That's probably what it takes to move up your body temp much. Pretty decent heart stress doing that also. I wouldn't recommend it for those that have heart related problems.

Dan
09-29-2016, 02:09 PM   #35
mf15
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Dan: Sounds too hot check your temp with an oral thermometer probably
don't want to go over 102 or so. Cant you get the sauna temp lower.
You may need to do more than once a day, so hydrate first.
My experiment just showed that you can get to 102 F in 20 minutes with
say 115 F water.
102 F probably safe, when you get to 104 then you start to cook your brain.

The key perhaps for crohns is fixing NOD2 which can be fixed by
up regulating HSP70, all of the above methods including heat might
be necessary.
This article put me onto this path.
http://www.emaxhealth.com/1020/prote...-gene-mutation



Mike

Last edited by mf15; 09-29-2016 at 02:39 PM.
09-29-2016, 03:39 PM   #36
xeridea
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This validates much of my recent studies. Though there are many organisms causing effects. The real problem is that many different pathogens are working together in symbiosis, while many Crohn's patients have a lowered amount of beneficial symbiotes of their own....
And the inflammatory state changes the nitrate levels in the intestines which promotes the growth of detrimental Enterobacteriaceae (the family that includes E. Coli) and those beat out the beneficial bacterial populations.

https://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/publis.../newsroom/7462
09-30-2016, 12:26 AM   #37
Lady Organic
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I wonder if IBD patients have more vaginal candida infections than the regular population...
Ive always had recurrent candida vaginal infections when I am sexually active. Its almost every month or every two months when Im lucky!!! This is highly annoying. I feel I am part of a minority of women who have to struggle with that.
I have been wondering for a little while now if I should take again, the oral systemic pill that fights candida, Diflucan : https://diflucan.ca/?&cid=semfnJMOrI...FYcmhgodg6kFzA...

This new research highly motivates me to take Difflucan next time I have an infection... or even before now that my colitis is still mildly active and not under control... may be worth a try

Thanks Old Mike for posting about the cinnamon oil. I am going to try it too.
__________________
''UC-like Crohn's'' since 2001:
on: 25mg 6-MP (purinethol)+ B12 shots
minor hands/wrists chronic arthritis since 01/2013

Diet: ''IBD-AID'' : http://www.nutritionj.com/content/13/1/5+ organic food only
suppl Curcuminoid extract, Inulin,psyllium, apple pectin, Vitamin D

past meds:
pred 50mg, 5-ASA, cortifoam, Imuran (failed) Purinethol (success) methotrexate (failed CD and arthritis).
09-30-2016, 05:17 AM   #38
mf15
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Join Date: Jun 2012
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Lady: Cinnamon oil is kind of strong, try eating cinnamon first.
Ceylon is supposed to be safer in large amounts since in contains little to no
coumarin, as compared to Cassia the regular store brands.

Coumarin may cause liver damage.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/260430.php

But then again coumarin is also a neutrophil elastase inhibitor.

Here is something whether true of not.
Of course you cant believe everything you read on the internet.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/opinions/7552

From reading this mouse study you would think it was a cure all.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21451725

from this one less is better
https://www.degruyter.com/downloadpd...013-0231-1.xml

I have tried quite a bit of cinnamon, 2-3 teaspoons/day no help for me.

IBD by occupation-Bakers are high, outside workers or laborers in general are low. Is it bowel motility in people that exercise a lot, or perhaps they get hot and sweat a lot. I guess bakers also sweat a lot, but they are quite exposed
to yeast.
As you know many with crohns have antibodies to bakers yeast.
Of course being a landscaper did not save my son, who has a pouch, then
again pesticide exposure, of which I am sure he was exposed much more
than the average person.
http://www.europeanreview.org/wp/wp-.../2838-2851.pdf
Old Mike

Last edited by mf15; 09-30-2016 at 11:24 AM.
09-30-2016, 04:14 PM   #39
Crohn2357
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Wow, lots of speculation going on in here. Thanks for sharing it.
10-05-2016, 06:23 AM   #40
mf15
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This may tie many things together, quite interesting and exciting.

Immune Recognition of Heat Shock Proteins Provides a Molecular Basis for the “Hygiene Hypothesis” Linking High Prevalence of Immune Disorders to Lack of Cell Stress Eliciting Events

hsp70 is not just about the rescue of NOD2, but the generation
of T regs

not sure what is going on with the two that wont link properly

Old Mike


https://www.hindawi.com/journals/isrn/2012/826863/

moving on
http://ajpgi.physiology.org/content/296/5/G1003

hsp70 downregulated inflammation and tnf
http://www.gastrojournal.org/article/S0016-5085(07)01693-9/abstract?referrer=http%3A%2F<strong></strong>%2F<strong></strong>www.mdpi.com%2F<strong></strong>2076-0817%2F<strong></strong>3%2F<strong></strong>1%2F<strong></strong>187%2F<strong></strong>htm

the two references above came from here
http://www.mdpi.com/2076-0817/3/1/187/htm

can also tie this in with fecal transplants
http://www.gastrojournal.org/article/S0016-5085(03)00215-4/abstract?referrer=http%3A%2F<strong></strong>%2F<strong></strong>www.mdpi.com%2F<strong></strong>2076-0817%2F<strong></strong>3%2F<strong></strong>1%2F<strong></strong>187%2F<strong></strong>htm
10-10-2016, 09:39 AM   #41
D Bergy
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An interesting article on Dr. Mercola's site on how Manuka Honey breaks up biofilm.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/ar...rid=1703640895

Never have tried it although I know it is used to inhibit growth of H-Pylori. One of the four or five things I suspect cause my symptoms.

Pretty low risk thing to test. Just have to make sure it is real Manuka Honey. Lots of fake products out there. If I remember right it's pretty expensive.

Dan
10-10-2016, 04:04 PM   #42
Crohn2357
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I use propolis tincture to treat my Crohn's (along with meds of course). It is very effective for me. It is worth a try.

The product I've been using is very similar to this one:
https://www.amazon.com/Propolis-Tinc...00028NCV4?th=1

I take 20 drops X 3 times a day.
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