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02-21-2010, 03:38 PM   #1
iminflamed
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cooked vegetables

I've decided these ARE THE BEST thing to eat for people with any form of IBD or IBS, better than fruit, whole grains, whatever. Just thought I'd share.
02-21-2010, 03:42 PM   #2
Jennjenn
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What are the best things??!! Cooked veggies....personally if its not soft carrots I get even more sick.
02-21-2010, 04:42 PM   #3
kenny
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Once you have had the pleasure of trying to use a syringe full of saline to aspirate undigested chunks of carrot through a foot of 1/4" tube sticking out of your gut you develop a healthy respect for the terms; Well Chewed and Well Cooked

As for cooked corn . . . . . just say no.
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02-21-2010, 08:05 PM   #4
Astra
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well I've got the squits today cos I ate Sunday Roast with all the veg thinking, it won't do any harm will it?
WRONG!
hello bog, staying here all day to keep you company!
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02-21-2010, 08:20 PM   #5
Rob
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I've tried all different types of cooked veg an well sorry not so good for me
glad here they work for you, I do miss my vegies

what I hav found that I can eat is tinned beetroot, tinned baby carrots, and mash potato (more specific the packet stuff dehydrated)
yea exciting stuff lol

so my meals - lunch and dinner is steamed chicken baby carrots (tinned) and mash potato
sometimes a bit if gravy if I feeling good
that's it for now until I can get over my current flare
luckily there are multi vitamins lol
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02-21-2010, 09:06 PM   #6
ChefShazzy
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yeah i can't really eat veggies either... even when cooked. i miss mushrooms.
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02-21-2010, 09:10 PM   #7
iminflamed
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I'm talking nonstarchy vegetables, no baked potatoes or any of that crap.

People complain about veggies some times but if you go awhile without eating them, then eat a bunch in a short amount of time, the fiber CAN BE hard to digest. And unfortunately these people will then quit eating veggies because they think they are bad for them. For these people they should gradually begin to consume the vegetables before just going all out right away, then you can increase your intake after you can comfortably eat them.

I'm going to graduate with 2 degrees in Food and Nutrition Science and Dietetics in the fall. And while I was on SCD I noticed that my gut was at its best, and my bowel movements were the most formed while I was eating lots of cooked veggies. I'm not boasting at all just explaining what I know, what I've learned, and my own anecdotal experiences.

The indigestible fiber in the veggies IS good for the gut because veggies do a good job of regulating peristalsis, do a good job soaking up liquid in the intestines in order to form bowel movements, plus they are extremely nutrient dense and provide tons of different phytochemicals.
02-21-2010, 09:17 PM   #8
iminflamed
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kenny said:
Once you have had the pleasure of trying to use a syringe full of saline to aspirate undigested chunks of carrot through a foot of 1/4" tube sticking out of your gut you develop a healthy respect for the terms; Well Chewed and Well Cooked

As for cooked corn . . . . . just say no.
corn is a grain fyi. One of the worst things you can eat if you have IBS or IBS in my opinion.
02-21-2010, 11:57 PM   #9
my.december
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Yeah, as a vegetarian who LOVES her veggies, I wish I could claim this was true for me. However, my dear veggies seems to cause more pain a lot of times.
02-22-2010, 03:41 PM   #10
CrohnsHobo
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I handle most veggies OK. All but corn really. I eat a ton of potatoes too. When I was vegi for seven years I did really well with my Crohn's.
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02-22-2010, 07:02 PM   #11
kenny
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iminflamed said:
corn is a grain fyi. One of the worst things you can eat if you have IBS or IBS in my opinion.
I was wondering about that when I wrote it. Because it is obviously used much like a flour when dry. plus it is a monocot like rye, wheat and such. But people seem to use it as a vegetable at the table for some reason.

I have expanded my diet to include canned wax and green beans as they are very soft and I think they are pre-stringed. Also canned carrots with caution. I'm still shy of them after they got all stuck in my tube when I was on low residue diet for 4 months with fistula/stricture issues. Hopefully this summer I will be healed up and brave enough to pick up fresh beans again.

Is the insoluble fiber mostly in the string and ends of field beans or the whole case or what??

Do field beans have the same digestibility issues as Navy/kidney type beans? As in starches breaking down in the colon rather than the small intestine?

I have made some refried beans to sub for hamburger in an attempt to up the veggie and down the meat protein. I read that the frying helps convert some of that problem complex starch associated with beans.
02-23-2010, 03:39 AM   #12
iminflamed
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kenny said:
I was wondering about that when I wrote it. Because it is obviously used much like a flour when dry. plus it is a monocot like rye, wheat and such. But people seem to use it as a vegetable at the table for some reason.

I have expanded my diet to include canned wax and green beans as they are very soft and I think they are pre-stringed. Also canned carrots with caution. I'm still shy of them after they got all stuck in my tube when I was on low residue diet for 4 months with fistula/stricture issues. Hopefully this summer I will be healed up and brave enough to pick up fresh beans again.

Is the insoluble fiber mostly in the string and ends of field beans or the whole case or what??

Do field beans have the same digestibility issues as Navy/kidney type beans? As in starches breaking down in the colon rather than the small intestine?

I have made some refried beans to sub for hamburger in an attempt to up the veggie and down the meat protein. I read that the frying helps convert some of that problem complex starch associated with beans.
Good questions, if you ask me again in a year I'll probably be able to give you a more definitive answer. I'm going through all the major nutrition courses right now for both majors.

For your first question, I'm not exactly sure what field beans are. If you are referring to beans such as green beans, then the insoluble fiber is mostly going to be found in all the areas around the actual bean inside the plant. Green beans are technically legumes, like most other beans. And the beans are typically composed of oligosacharides (8-10 chained sugar molecules composed of monosacharides). This is basically the starch inside the bean, and is where the "soluble" fiber inside the green bean is going to be found. Everything else around the bean is going to be insoluble fiber. This is why green beans are an excellent source of insoluble fiber because the actually beans only compose a small part of the plant.

I'm not sure about your second question, I assume most beans are digested in the small intestine since that is where most of your starches are broken down and absorbed. I actually have an appointment with my MNT professor on Thursday I may just ask her these questions to get you a more definitive answer.

And keep your protein intake up, mainly your intake of chicken and fish. If you have trouble with red meat then that is understandable. Adequate protein intake from animal foods is also important for a healthy digestive system.
02-24-2010, 02:12 AM   #13
iminflamed
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Just to further reiterate my point on the gradual introduction of fiber in the diet, here is a direct quote from my Medical Nutrition Therapy book. I have a test next week on the upper and lower GI tract.

"Appropriate cautions are also warranted for persons with GI strictures or dysmotility syndromes. In these situations the fiber content of the diet should be increased slowly, taking almost a month to reach desired intakes of 25 to 38 g of fiber per day. Gradual initiation of a high-fiber diet may help reduce unpleasant side effects such as increased flatulence, borborygmus (intestinal rumbling), cramps, or diarrhea. A gradual increase in fiber intake helps alleviate these symptoms."

further down...

"GI disturbances associated with initial fiber ingestion usually decrease within 4 to 5 days, but some increase in flatulence is normal with a high-fiber intake. The high-fiber diet is most effective when consumed continuously for several months."
02-27-2010, 05:34 PM   #14
rygon
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I enjoy roasted veg best, but try to steam the rest to keep the good stuff in
03-19-2010, 07:34 PM   #15
Lydia
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I seem to handle cooked veggies just fine. Even the no-no veggies like broccoli and caulitflower as long as they are cooked well. I do take time to chew my food well. I cant do corn. Cornmeal/flakes are ok but not whole corn. So much pain.

My favorite go-to snack when I dont know what to eat is a banana. Not exactly a veg, but the most tolerated thing for me.
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