Crohn's Disease Forum » Forum Wiki » Celiac Disease

Celiac Disease

Contents


About Celiac Disease (also Coeliac Disease)

Celiac Disease, or Coeliac Disease in the United Kingdom, is an Inherited condition and is caused by an AutoImmune Reaction to eating Gluten. Celiac Disease is extremely common, affecting approximately 1 in 133 people. Most people with Celiac Disease (97%) do not know they have it.[1][2][3][4]

Gluten is found in:
Barley
Bulgur
Couscous
Dinkle
Durum
Einkorn
Emmer
Farina
Gliadin
Graham Flour
Kamut
Matza / Matzo / Matzah
Oats
Rye
Seitan
Semolina
Spelt
Triticale
Wheat
Wheat Grass

When Gluten is eaten, an Immune Response is triggered and causes damage in the Small Intestine.

Damage to the Small Intestine can reduce its ability to absorb Nutrients and Vitamins and lead to further illness.[2]

Symptoms of Celiac Disease

Symptoms of Celiac Disease can include any or all of the following recurrent symptoms (although some persons may be Asymptomatic:[1][2][3]
Symptoms
Ataxia
Constipation
Depression
Diarrhea (Diarrhoea)
Fatigue / Tiredness
Gas
Hair Loss (Alopecia)
Headaches
Infertility and/or Miscarriages
Joint Pain / Bone Pain
Nausea
Neuropathy
Osteoperosis
Rash (Dermatitis Herpetiformis)
Stools that are Bloody, Fatty, Float, and/or Foul Smelling
Stomach Bloating, Cramping, and/or Pain
Tooth Enamel Loss
Ulcers in the Mouth
Vitamin Deficiencies (especially Folic Acid, Iron, Vitamin B12)
Vomiting
Weight Loss

Celiac Disease is Linked to Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

Persons with Celiac Disease have an increased likelihood of a certain type of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) called Lymphocytic Colitis.

Persons who still have symptoms while adhering to the Gluten Free diet should be screened for a possible Lymphocytic Colitis diagnosis.

Celiac Disease and Other Conditions

Celiac Disease can correlate with and increased likelihood of other conditions, some may be caused by Malabsorption and Vitamin and Mineral Deficiencies secondary to Celiac Disease.
Alopecia Areata
Alopecia Areata, a type of nonscarring hair loss, may correlate with Celiac Disease. Although the number of studies are few, persons suffering from Alopecia Areata often see complete regrowth of hair when put on a Gluten Free diet.
Chronic Liver Disease, Elevated Liver Enzymes
Abnormal liver function and Liver Disease may correlate with Celiac Disease in some patients. Even in Asymptomatic Celiac Disease, the addition of a Gluten Free diet normalized Liver Function Tests in some patients.[7]
Gastrointestinal Cancers
Lactose Intolerance
The enzyme that breaks down the milk sugar called Lactose is made in a part of the intestine damaged by Gluten intake in persons with Celiac Disease. As a result, Celiac Disease (especially in those not on a strict Gluten-free diet) can also cause Lactose intolerance.
non Hodgkin Lymphoma
Psoriasis
Persons with Celiac Disease have an increased likelihood of Psoriasis. Some patients see improvement of Psoriasis symptoms with a Gluten Free Diet, although it may take 3 - 6 months before improvement is seen in the absence of concurrent pharmacological therapies.[5]

References

[pos]1a[/pos][1]. http://www.coeliac.org.uk
[pos]2a[/pos][2]. http://www.csaceliacs.info/celiac_disease_defined.jsp
[pos]3a[/pos][3]. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001280
[pos]4a[/pos][4]. http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/med...uide/diagnosis
[pos]5a[/pos][5]. Marzia Caproni, Veronica Bonciolini, Antonietta D'Errico, Emiliano Antiga, and Paolo Fabbri, “Celiac Disease and Dermatologic Manifestations: Many Skin Clue to Unfold Gluten-Sensitive Enteropathy,” Gastroenterology Research and Practice, vol. 2012, Article ID 952753, 12 pages, 2012. doi:10.1155/2012/952753 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/grp/2012/952753
[pos]6a[/pos][6]. Alessio Fasano, “Novel Therapeutic/Integrative Approaches for Celiac Disease and Dermatitis Herpetiformis,” Clinical and Developmental Immunology, vol. 2012, Article ID 959061, 7 pages, 2012. doi:10.1155/2012/959061. http://downloads.hindawi.com/journal...012/959061.pdf
[pos]7a[/pos][7]. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3309630

Popular Threads Discussing Celiac Disease



Page Tools
No one has commented on this article.

Reply
Page Tools
Search this Page

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:27 AM.
Copyright 2006-2012 Crohnsforum.com