Crohn's Disease Forum » Parents of Kids with IBD » Diet/Cooking for Kids with IBD » What is a Low Residue Diet. Article.


06-20-2013, 04:19 PM   #1
DustyKat
Super Moderator
 
DustyKat's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: New South Wales, Australia
What is a Low Residue Diet. Article.

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) like Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis or diverticulitis, your doctor may suggest you follow a low-residue diet. A low-residue diet involves eating more easily digestible foods. A low-residue diet may reduce symptoms of IBD, such as diarrhea and stomach cramping; however, it will not cure IBD.

What Is a Low-Residue Diet?

A low-residue diet is a diet in which fiber and other foods that are harder for your body to digest are restricted. Fiber is made up of plant material that cannot be completely digested by the body. High-fiber foods include whole-grain breads and cereals, nuts, seeds, and raw or dried fruits.

Residue refers to undigested foods, including fiber, that make up stool. If intestinal walls are inflamed or damaged, digestion and absorption of nutrients and water may be impaired, depending on the location of disease activity.

In some people with Crohn's disease, the small intestine may also become very narrowed. The idea behind a low-residue diet is to reduce the number and size of bowel movements you have each day, thereby lessening painful IBD symptoms such as cramping, diarrhea, bloating, and gas. However, it does not affect inflammation or the disease itself.

A low-residue/low-fiber diet may be recommended for short-term use during disease flare-ups or following surgery to help with recovery. However, it is not a general eating plan for all people with IBD. Your health care provider or nutritionist can help make sure your diet plan is appropriate. In addition to dietary changes, your health care provider or nutritionist may recommend vitamin supplements.
Read the full article for recommended foods and foods to avoid plus menu plans....

http://www.webmd.com/ibd-crohns-dise...due-diet-foods

Dusty.
__________________
Mum of 2 kids with Crohn's.
06-01-2014, 10:25 AM   #2
malorymug
Senior Member
 
malorymug's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: DFW, Texas

My Support Groups:
Instead of creating a new thread about low residue, I thought I would just piggyback. This was a good article but not much different than our GI doc gave us. I'm looking for more specifics, maybe some tips and tricks.

My 13 year old boy is a seed, nut, and fruit eater. The first few weeks we've tried to stay low residue were fine, sorta a fun change from the normal, but now we are in the mundane. And it is fresh fruit season and he feels like he is missing out and I hate that for him.

How do you all do handle fresh fruit? Juicing? or cooking?

Fresh raspberries are the point of contention this morning.
__________________
Mom to: 15 year old boy
Crohn's in stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and perianal disease
Diagnosed April 2014, at age 13

Currently taking:
Remicade 10mg/kg every 6 wks
Methotrexate 7.5 mg/wk
Cipro
Augmentin
Miralax

previous meds:
6mp 50mg
Flagyl
Cipro
Prednisone 30 mg
06-01-2014, 01:58 PM   #3
my little penguin
Forum Monitor
 
Join Date: Apr 2012

My Support Groups:
You have to realize low residue is not for life - only until the inflammation gets under control.
My kiddo had life threatening food allergies to nuts for over five years .
If you feel focus on what he can't have or feel sorry for him then he will be believe he is missing out .
Focus on what he can have
Research recipe websites to find new foods
Especially baked goods
Have him help you pick /cook the new items so he is more invested.

DS went 9 weeks without any food only formula through thanksgiving /Christmas
So it can be done - your approach can make a big difference even if he is 13.


Our Gi ok'd nuts as long as they are in the form of nut butters or pulverized and put into baked goods ( ie. brownies).

Realistically missing out on a few foods is not the end of the world but fistula/abscesses that have formed from irratated intestines probably would make him feel worse.- which was how DS Gi explained it to him.

Fruit DS eats watermelon , cantaloupe, honey dew, oranges , peeled apples , peeled pears.
The skin is the issue in the fruits not the fruit itself.
__________________
DS - -Crohn's -Stelara -mtx
06-01-2014, 02:28 PM   #4
malorymug
Senior Member
 
malorymug's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: DFW, Texas

My Support Groups:
Thank you. I needed that pep talk. I think I've been fairly positive with the food changes but when we came in with fresh picked raspberries my son was unhappy. I guess I was hoping I could juice them, but perhaps I should just give them away this season and not even bring them in the house.

We will concentrate on what he can eat.
06-01-2014, 06:37 PM   #5
DustyKat
Super Moderator
 
DustyKat's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: New South Wales, Australia
mlp is spot on malorymug.

Think of Low Residue Diet as a treatment, it is not for the long haul and is designed to alleviate symptoms. Focus on that aspect of things and the positives it will bring knowing all the while that your lad will be able to go back to what he enjoys most.

It is a bland diet for sure, mind you Matt likes that sort of food!, but I think the main thing I did with him was to keep temptation well out of the house. That is not to say everyone else was restricted too but rather the things he had a particular love for were avoided.

Dusty. xxx
06-01-2014, 07:38 PM   #6
Susan2
Senior Member
 
Susan2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Geelong, Victoria, Australia

My Support Groups:
I find that I can eat raspberries if I puree them and pass through a very fine sieve to take out the seeds. Of the summer fruits, I have no problem with stewed plums; once stewed, I blitz them with a stick blender.

Skinned walnuts are probably the easiest of the nuts to digest.
__________________
Crohn's Disease - symptoms since c1955, diagnosed early 1970s. On Prednisolone until...
Total Proctocolectomy in 2000.
Ileostomy that behaves most of the time
Currently on no medications, but under constant gaze of very caring GP, with annual blood and other tests.
Reply

Crohn's Disease Forum » Parents of Kids with IBD » Diet/Cooking for Kids with IBD » What is a Low Residue Diet. Article.
Thread Tools


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:26 AM.
Copyright 2006-2017 Crohnsforum.com